The Grey's Anatomy Premium vs. CSI

Categories: TV Advertising

Written By

October 1st, 2007

Grey’s Anatomy

Your momma is so old she watches CSI instead of Grey's Anatomy? I'm trying to learn what advertisers value. Earlier I questioned the difference in pricing for a 30 second spot on Grey's Anatomy vs. CSI: $419K vs. $248K according to the Fall season Advertising Age survey. I speculated that the price differential probably wasn't completely based on the 18-49 category because there was only about a 9% difference there, and the premium is significantly higher than 9%.

I went digging around and found this ABC press release issued last Friday which played up that Grey's had a 43% ratings advantage among adults aged 18-34, where Grey's had 9.0 rating w/23 share. Among women 18-34 Grey's pulled a stellar 13.4 rating and a 30 share (of women 18-34 with their TV's turned on, 30% of them were tuned into Grey's).

I'm guessing that it's these metrics that are justifying the premium. As a % of the Grey's pricing the difference of 171K between the cost for the two shows is about 40%. I can see where advertisers would value the 18-34 segment on a "they're still young and can hopefully be influenced by us" basis. If that's the case, from that perspective the premium doesn't seem that outrageous. Although CSI had 20% more viewers, they were older.

Nielsen's estimates for this season include a total of about 67m people in the 18-34 category and around 131m in the 18-49 group Each segment is fairly evenly split between males and females. While the 18-49 demo is surely important, it would appear that the 18-34 demo is more important. Sadly, we do not receive weekly information from Nielsen breaking out that demo, but we'll look for the press releases.

 
  • Al Dugan

    Guys,

    Stories like these make it seem like you only have a passing knowledge of how television advertising is bought and sold. NO ONE buys Grey's or CSI alone. No Network will sell Grey's or CSI alone, unless you are a movie company at the last minute trying to get into a sold out show. Those prices are PR numbers and have no relation to the actual prices that advertisers pay for these shows. Stop trying to compare who pays what for individual shows and concentrate on who's getting the most money for all of their shows. In this marketplace it's CBS with ABC a close second. Study up, boys , and then you will seem a bit more knowledgable.

  • Al Dugan

    Guys,

    Stories like these make it seem like you only have a passing knowledge of how television advertising is bought and sold. NO ONE buys Grey’s or CSI alone. No Network will sell Grey’s or CSI alone, unless you are a movie company at the last minute trying to get into a sold out show. Those prices are PR numbers and have no relation to the actual prices that advertisers pay for these shows. Stop trying to compare who pays what for individual shows and concentrate on who’s getting the most money for all of their shows. In this marketplace it’s CBS with ABC a close second. Study up, boys , and then you will seem a bit more knowledgable.

  • Robert Seidman

    Al, indeed we do have only a passing knowledge about the way advertising is bought and sold and I won't speak for Bill, but I have no problem learning in real-time.

    One of the things I've learned is that certain shows actually really do receive premium pricing for the 30 seconds spots, and I still think it's worth understanding those premiums.

    Still, I fully agree that the thing that matters most at the end of the day is how much money the networks make. It's not clear that CBS is actually winning by any real margin with its primetime lineup. ABC and CBS both claimed the same round numbers from the upfronts. If you have some stats besides the upfront data that you would like to share, please do post or e-mail them! The upfront #'s reported in the press seem at least as much “PR” as any of the spot ad cost estimates in Advertising Age or Media Week.

    Yeah, CBS and ABC both claimed about the same money from the upfronts but that only represents somewhere in the neighborhood of 75% of the ad buys for the season, right? I'd grant 75% is a healthy chunk, but won't spot ad cost come into play for the other ~25%, and actually play a part in determining the…winner?

  • Robert Seidman

    Al, indeed we do have only a passing knowledge about the way advertising is bought and sold and I won’t speak for Bill, but I have no problem learning in real-time.

    One of the things I’ve learned is that certain shows actually really do receive premium pricing for the 30 seconds spots, and I still think it’s worth understanding those premiums.

    Still, I fully agree that the thing that matters most at the end of the day is how much money the networks make. It’s not clear that CBS is actually winning by any real margin with its primetime lineup. ABC and CBS both claimed the same round numbers from the upfronts. If you have some stats besides the upfront data that you would like to share, please do post or e-mail them! The upfront #’s reported in the press seem at least as much “PR” as any of the spot ad cost estimates in Advertising Age or Media Week.

    Yeah, CBS and ABC both claimed about the same money from the upfronts but that only represents somewhere in the neighborhood of 75% of the ad buys for the season, right? I’d grant 75% is a healthy chunk, but won’t spot ad cost come into play for the other ~25%, and actually play a part in determining the…winner?

  • http://map33.blogspot.com/ angela

    I could be wrong but I think the fact that there are multiple CSI shows on prime time network television every week — effects the price.

  • http://map33.blogspot.com/ angela

    I could be wrong but I think the fact that there are multiple CSI shows on prime time network television every week — effects the price.

© 2014 Tribune Digital Ventures