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Top Timeshifted Broadcast Shows, Nov 19-25

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December 10th, 2007

Grey's Anatomy Has a Timeshifted Audience of 3.8 Million

Grey’s AnatomyWith 3.76 million timeshifted (DVR) viewers, Grey's Anatomy had the largest absolute timeshifted audience in the week of Nov 19-25. However, not only didn't the huge DVR usage expected by James Hibberd occur, DVR viewing was a bit less than the usual Grey's timeshifting pattern. UPDATE: We may have misunderstood the original James Hibberd column on the strategy for the Thankgiving shows. Regardless, any hopes for an increase in DVR viewing of that Thanksgiving Grey's episode went for naught.

CBS had the most shows (10) out of the top 20 in absolute timeshifted audience size.

Top 20 Largest Timeshifted Audience Broadcast TV Shows:

Rank Programs Network Persons Live+7 (million) Persons Live (million) Timeshifed Audience (000s) % Increase Over Live
1 GREYS ANATOMY SP-11/22 ABC 16.63 12.87 3,755 29.2%
2 HOUSE FOX 18.80 15.22 3,573 23.5%
3 HEROES NBC 12.20 9.31 2,886 31.0%
4 Desperate Housewives ABC 19.86 17.14 2,718 15.9%
5 CSI - THANKSGIVING SP CBS 16.54 13.95 2,597 18.6%
6 Criminal Minds CBS 17.26 14.95 2,311 15.5%
7 Private Practice ABC 9.79 7.75 2,035 26.3%
8 BONES FOX 9.71 7.83 1,879 24.0%
9 CSI: MIAMI CBS 16.98 15.18 1,802 11.9%
10 NCIS CBS 18.40 16.63 1,767 10.6%
11 UGLY BETTY SP-11/22 ABC 8.55 6.80 1,745 25.7%
12 BROTHERS & SISTERS ABC 13.24 11.61 1,629 14.0%
13 THE UNIT CBS 11.81 10.23 1,576 15.4%
14 Two and a Half Men CBS 14.61 13.04 1,572 12.1%
15 CSI: NY CBS 15.63 14.08 1,549 11.0%
16 SURVIVOR: CHINA-THANKS SP CBS 12.36 10.83 1,528 14.1%
17 DANCING W/THE STARS-MON ABC 23.34 21.82 1,523 7.0%
18 Amazing Race 12 CBS 12.32 10.81 1,507 13.9%
19 NUMB3RS CBS 11.18 9.71 1,470 15.1%
20 DANCING W/STARS RESULT-TU ABC 21.45 20.09 1,362 6.8%

The Largest Timeshifting Audience table ranks which of the Top 150 broadcast shows [by Live+7 viewers] had the largest absolute number of timeshifted viewers on their digital video recorders (DVRs).

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NBC's Heroes Has A 31% Increase Via DVR Viewing

For the week of Nov 19-25, NBC's Heroes audience increased by 31.0% over the 9.31 million that watched it Live giving it a Live+7 audience of 12.20 million, again making it the leading broadcast show for % increase in viewing via DVR.

Grey's Anatomy had its audience increase by 29.2% over its Live airing placing it second for the week. Beauty and the Geek, America's Top Model and Private Practice round out the largest % increase Top 5. ABC had the most timeshifted shows on a % basis with 7 of the 20.

Top 20 Most % Timeshifted Broadcast TV Shows:

Rank Programs Network Persons Live+7 (million) Persons Live (million) Timeshifed Audience (000s) % Increase Over Live
1 HEROES NBC 12.20 9.31 2,886 31.0%
2 GREYS ANATOMY SP-11/22 ABC 16.63 12.87 3,755 29.2%
3 BEAUTY AND THE GEEK-2 CW 2.77 2.17 593 27.3%
4 AMERICAS Top Model-3 CW 4.10 3.24 864 26.7%
5 Private Practice ABC 9.79 7.75 2,035 26.3%
6 UGLY BETTY SP-11/22 ABC 8.55 6.80 1,745 25.7%
7 BONES FOX 9.71 7.83 1,879 24.0%
8 HOUSE FOX 18.80 15.22 3,573 23.5%
9 JOURNEYMAN NBC 6.38 5.30 1,080 20.4%
10 DIRTY SEXY MONEY ABC 7.24 6.04 1,201 19.9%
11 MEN IN TREES SP-11/23 ABC 6.10 5.12 983 19.2%
12 KID NATION CBS 7.56 6.34 1,216 19.2%
13 CHUCK NBC 8.40 7.08 1,327 18.8%
14 CSI - THANKSGIVING SP CBS 16.54 13.95 2,597 18.6%
15 PUSHING DAISIES ABC 8.19 7.00 1,188 17.0%
16 Desperate Housewives ABC 19.86 17.14 2,718 15.9%
17 How I Met Your Mother CBS 8.53 7.38 1,149 15.6%
18 Criminal Minds CBS 17.26 14.95 2,311 15.5%
19 THE UNIT CBS 11.81 10.23 1,576 15.4%
20 NUMB3RS CBS 11.18 9.71 1,470 15.1%

The % Timeshifting table ranks which of the Top 150 broadcast shows [by Live+7 viewers] had the largest % increase in viewing between Live audience and Live+7 audience numbers from viewers watching shows later on their digital video recorders (DVRs).

 

Nielsen TV Ratings Data: ©2007 Nielsen Media Research, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 
  • Rena Moretti

    I think a complete (or at least Top 20) of ratings including the +7 Data would be more informative than who got the most DVR audience, which is pretty much academic.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    Rena, we're limited to a list of 20 (versus complete), but you're not the only one who has asked for a “true” top 20 list taking all the DVR (LIVE+7) viewers into account.

    Mostly the reason we didn't publish it is because by the time it comes out it is so dated, but, next time I talk to Bill we'll discuss it.

  • Rena Moretti

    I like when I can find complete lists because there's always interesting surprises. Like when I found that “hit” The Shield in the 300s with a lilliputian audience.

    But Top 20 is better than nothing.

    Thanks for the info and the response.

  • Rena Moretti

    I think a complete (or at least Top 20) of ratings including the +7 Data would be more informative than who got the most DVR audience, which is pretty much academic.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    Rena, we’re limited to a list of 20 (versus complete), but you’re not the only one who has asked for a “true” top 20 list taking all the DVR (LIVE+7) viewers into account.

    Mostly the reason we didn’t publish it is because by the time it comes out it is so dated, but, next time I talk to Bill we’ll discuss it.

  • Rena Moretti

    I like when I can find complete lists because there’s always interesting surprises. Like when I found that “hit” The Shield in the 300s with a lilliputian audience.

    But Top 20 is better than nothing.

    Thanks for the info and the response.

  • Ike

    I almost never watch “The Shield” but it wouldn't have lasted this long if it weren't profitable in some way. It probably draws huge numbers of men 18-34 and men 18-49 which is a very lucrative demo because that audience is otherwise so difficult to capture. So many men 18-49 and especially men 18-34 have abandoned TV for video games, the Internet, DVDs, etc. and rarely watch anything but sports, so advertisers will pay out the wazoo to reach them. I'm not saying it's right, but it's true.

  • Ike

    I almost never watch “The Shield” but it wouldn’t have lasted this long if it weren’t profitable in some way. It probably draws huge numbers of men 18-34 and men 18-49 which is a very lucrative demo because that audience is otherwise so difficult to capture. So many men 18-49 and especially men 18-34 have abandoned TV for video games, the Internet, DVDs, etc. and rarely watch anything but sports, so advertisers will pay out the wazoo to reach them. I’m not saying it’s right, but it’s true.

  • Rena Moretti

    Once again Ike, you make an interesting point.

    I happen to disagree with it (sorry :) )

    Most people think the networks and studios are only motivated by profits, but that's not the case at all.

    We could all wish it were true. It would lead to better programming.

    Hollywood executives are motivated first and foremost by the drive to keep their jobs and cover their behinds. That's the reason for instance that they keep up the charade of testing new shows with test audiences even though experience shows that it's a futile and needless exercise.

    The reason they do it? Once the show fails, it gives them cover. They can say “but it tested through the roof”.

    For the same reason, Flavors of the Month get hired for movies so when they fail executives can point to the cover of a magazine and say “who could have thought the public would have changed overnight?”

    Renewing failing shows is part of that trend (so is greenlighting sequels to failed movies). The Shield is the perfect example, but many others can be found. Friday Night Lights is a ratings disaster, but NBC bought it a couple of awards so they could renew it and claim their season wasn't so bad.

    Les Moonves recently boasted that because he was going to renew two of his new shows, the season was a resounding success (apparently losing 10% of your audience in great part because your new shows all tanked is the new definition of “success”)

    It's also very potent PR, because most people haven't caught on to that trick yet. They've caught on to most of the other tricks Hollywood uses to try and disguise its failings into successes.

    Of course, one wishes all that energy was directed at making better films and TV shows, but that is a trick Hollywood still has to learn.

  • Rena Moretti

    Once again Ike, you make an interesting point.

    I happen to disagree with it (sorry :) )

    Most people think the networks and studios are only motivated by profits, but that’s not the case at all.

    We could all wish it were true. It would lead to better programming.

    Hollywood executives are motivated first and foremost by the drive to keep their jobs and cover their behinds. That’s the reason for instance that they keep up the charade of testing new shows with test audiences even though experience shows that it’s a futile and needless exercise.

    The reason they do it? Once the show fails, it gives them cover. They can say “but it tested through the roof”.

    For the same reason, Flavors of the Month get hired for movies so when they fail executives can point to the cover of a magazine and say “who could have thought the public would have changed overnight?”

    Renewing failing shows is part of that trend (so is greenlighting sequels to failed movies). The Shield is the perfect example, but many others can be found. Friday Night Lights is a ratings disaster, but NBC bought it a couple of awards so they could renew it and claim their season wasn’t so bad.

    Les Moonves recently boasted that because he was going to renew two of his new shows, the season was a resounding success (apparently losing 10% of your audience in great part because your new shows all tanked is the new definition of “success”)

    It’s also very potent PR, because most people haven’t caught on to that trick yet. They’ve caught on to most of the other tricks Hollywood uses to try and disguise its failings into successes.

    Of course, one wishes all that energy was directed at making better films and TV shows, but that is a trick Hollywood still has to learn.

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