Online Video Increase Driven by Writer's Strike?

Categories: Internet TV

Written By

February 10th, 2008

comScore reported Friday that December, 2007 was a record month for online video viewing. Makes sense, for pretty much everything online each new time period brings "records".

What doesn't make any sense is their subsequent conclusion “With the writer’s strike keeping new TV episodes from reaching the airwaves, viewers have been seeking alternatives for fresh content. It appears that online video is stepping in to help fill that void.”

That's a linking of cause and effect that just doesn't hold up.

First of all, the strike caused very few changes in the network schedules during December. Second, we know that for most of the broadcast networks, their December viewing was at or above their November viewing compared with last year.

I'll chalk it up to lazy PR by comScore, wanting to get extra notice for their press release by saying "look, here, it's the writer's strike again!".

 
  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    lazy PR is when you don’t actually make stuff up to get attention. I don’t consider this lazy. Dissemation of bad info in order to get attention is why PR flacks GET PAID!

    I don’t know that that release merits anyone getting a bonus, but…hardly lazy. BTW, for online video #s junkies, Chris Albrecht of NewTeevee.com did some nice analysis of “web shows” viewing numbers.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    lazy PR is when you don’t actually make stuff up to get attention. I don’t consider this lazy. Dissemation of bad info in order to get attention is why PR flacks GET PAID!

    I don’t know that that release merits anyone getting a bonus, but…hardly lazy. BTW, for online video #s junkies, Chris Albrecht of NewTeevee.com did some nice analysis of “web shows” viewing numbers.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com/ Bill Gorman

    So, instead of “lazy” PR, perhaps I should have written “standard operating procedure” PR!

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com/ Bill Gorman

    So, instead of “lazy” PR, perhaps I should have written “standard operating procedure” PR!

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Bill Gorman

    So, instead of “lazy” PR, perhaps I should have written “standard operating procedure” PR!

  • http://www.tv.com/users/vendbien/profile.php# Jon V

    I’m not sure of what ‘fresh content’ you speak. My understanding is that writers (and now I assume, actors) want a piece of the advertising money associated with TV shows that are then shown on network-owned websites. That makes sense.

    If we’re talking about ‘other’ forms of ‘webertainment’ like YouTube or MyTube or His/Her/ItsTube, I guess those will increasingly draw people away from their TVs, but only to the point of saturation. And of course, networks can always advertise their replays on those sites and drag viewers back to their (the networks) website, at which point the new WGA/SAG contracts internet revenue stipulations kick in anyway.

    Is comScore including reruns of TV shows on network websites as fresh? Do they monitor the Nielsen internet ratings? Does Nielsen monitor comScore ratings?

    Is anyone else out there as dizzy as I just got???

  • http://www.tv.com/users/vendbien/profile.php# Jon V

    I’m not sure of what ‘fresh content’ you speak. My understanding is that writers (and now I assume, actors) want a piece of the advertising money associated with TV shows that are then shown on network-owned websites. That makes sense.

    If we’re talking about ‘other’ forms of ‘webertainment’ like YouTube or MyTube or His/Her/ItsTube, I guess those will increasingly draw people away from their TVs, but only to the point of saturation. And of course, networks can always advertise their replays on those sites and drag viewers back to their (the networks) website, at which point the new WGA/SAG contracts internet revenue stipulations kick in anyway.

    Is comScore including reruns of TV shows on network websites as fresh? Do they monitor the Nielsen internet ratings? Does Nielsen monitor comScore ratings?

    Is anyone else out there as dizzy as I just got???

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    Comscore is basically just counting all the video watching and benchmarking growth. “Reruns” don’t yet have any meaning on the Internet.

    Essentially, online video consumption is up — a trend we expect to continue for a long while to come. Bill correctly derided comScore for attributing the growth to the writer’s strike — for the December period they were measuring, there was not yet much “strike impact” in terms of new episodes.

    There will be continued growth in online video consumption well after the strike is resolved. We expect some kind of headline from comScore that goes “Online growth continues as viewers spurn traditional tv after the strike”. We don’t expect any such spurning, but we do expect the press release nonetheless!

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    Comscore is basically just counting all the video watching and benchmarking growth. “Reruns” don’t yet have any meaning on the Internet.

    Essentially, online video consumption is up — a trend we expect to continue for a long while to come. Bill correctly derided comScore for attributing the growth to the writer’s strike — for the December period they were measuring, there was not yet much “strike impact” in terms of new episodes.

    There will be continued growth in online video consumption well after the strike is resolved. We expect some kind of headline from comScore that goes “Online growth continues as viewers spurn traditional tv after the strike”. We don’t expect any such spurning, but we do expect the press release nonetheless!

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    Comscore is basically just counting all the video watching and benchmarking growth. “Reruns” don’t yet have any meaning on the Internet.

    Essentially, online video consumption is up — a trend we expect to continue for a long while to come. Bill correctly derided comScore for attributing the growth to the writer’s strike — for the December period they were measuring, there was not yet much “strike impact” in terms of new episodes.

    There will be continued growth in online video consumption well after the strike is resolved. We expect some kind of headline from comScore that goes “Online growth continues as viewers spurn traditional tv after the strike”. We don’t expect any such spurning, but we do expect the press release nonetheless!

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com/ Bill Gorman

    It makes sense that they tag the press releases with something catchy, but I figure it should at least make sense.

    “Online video viewing up, yet again, same sites in the list as last time, in about the same order” isn’t going to grab anyone.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com/ Bill Gorman

    It makes sense that they tag the press releases with something catchy, but I figure it should at least make sense.

    “Online video viewing up, yet again, same sites in the list as last time, in about the same order” isn’t going to grab anyone.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com/ Bill Gorman

    It makes sense that they tag the press releases with something catchy, but I figure it should at least make sense.

    “Online video viewing up, yet again, same sites in the list as last time, in about the same order” isn’t going to grab anyone.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Bill Gorman

    It makes sense that they tag the press releases with something catchy, but I figure it should at least make sense.

    “Online video viewing up, yet again, same sites in the list as last time, in about the same order” isn’t going to grab anyone.

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