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Nielsen Ratings Tue, Mar 25: Idol Beats Dancing, Au Revoir Jericho

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March 26th, 2008

Scoreboard for Tue. March 25, 2008 FOX ABC NBC CBS CW
Total Viewers (million) 20.99 12.67 8.06 7.11 1.64
Rating/Share: Adults 18-49 8.3/21 3.0/8 2.9/6 2.0/5 0.7/2

American Idol was on for an hour and a half and FOX won the night in a blowout.  Even with an hour of Dancing with the Stars (two hours, if you count the recap), ABC was a very, very distant second.   DWTS is a hit for ABC, but it's no AI.  Especially in the 18-49 where AI drew a 9.6/24 and the DWTS results show a 3.8/9.   Idol's domination is kind of scary.

While the spread between total viewers between American Idol and Dancing with the Stars was smaller than the spread between DWTS and The Biggest Loser,  the gap in the 18-49 ratings was much smaller.  Loser had a 3.1/8 among 18-49 viewers in the overnight ratings. Not too shabby up against AI and DWTS! 

In last place (unless you count the CW) was CBS, with an NCIS repeat, Big Brother, and the series finale of Jericho performed pretty much exactly the way they have for the last few weeks. Which, other than NCIS was not so great. 

I enjoyed the Jericho finale -- even though they didn't nuke Cheyenne, there were still enough explosions (and aciton) to keep me happy.  and I wish there was some way for me to buy the unaired cliffhanger right now.  I'm sure I'd pay $5 for it.

One note for Reaper fans.  A Reaper repeat outdrew a new Beauty and the Geek in total viewers.  That can't be a bad thing for its quest for renewal.

Tuesday Night's full details:

Time Network Show Viewers (Millons) 18-49 Rating/Share HH Rating
8:00 FOX American Idol 8p-9:30p 24.38 9.6/24 14.3
  CBS NCIS (Repeat) 9.4 1.9/5 6.3
  NBC The Biggest Loser (8p-10p) 7.86 3.1/8 5.1
  ABC Dancing with the Stars Recap (8p-9p) 10.43 2.1/6 7.1
  CW Beauty and the Geek 1.62 0.7/2 1.3
           
           
9:00 CBS Big Brother 9 5.95 2.2/5 3.4
  ABC Dancing with the Stars 17.9 3.8/9 11.4
  CW Reaper (Repeat) 1.67 0.6/2 1.2
           
10:00 CBS Jericho 5.99 1.9/5 3.4
  NBC Law & Order: SVU (Repeat) 8.54 2.6/7 6.4
  ABC Primetime: What Would You Do? 10.4 3.2/9 7.2

Nielsen Ratings Source: Nielsen Media Research. Full night's results available via Marc Berman/Mediaweek.

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  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    KIC, if you and I question things on this board, I don't think it's a light. It's something we like to do because we like thinking about it! That's fine, but our opinions as viewers and consumers of television shows are completely ancillary to the primary market of buyers and sellers of advertising.

    If advertisers question things, and say, “nope, we're not going to buy those ads from you unless you get better measurement,” then it's a light.

    It's not that they don't wind up putting pressure on Nielsen to change things. But as far as I can tell neither the broadcasters or advertisers are hung up about the sample and the measurement, they're hung up over “of all the things we can measure, what's the one we should actually PAY based on.”

    Our opinions really don't count because we're not the primary consumer of the Nielsen information, the broadcasters and the advertisers — the buyers and sellers that form the real market are. Only they can force major changes to Nielsen.

    Nielsen does have its competitors — Arbitron for local markets, TNS Media with set top box, etc, but Nielsen is still the leader and that's because the primary market (advertisers and broadcasters) make them the leader. Will this always be the case? I have no idea, but it will be the case for a while and certainly through the 2008-2009 viewing season.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Robert Seidman

    KIC, if you and I question things on this board, I don’t think it’s a light. It’s something we like to do because we like thinking about it! That’s fine, but our opinions as viewers and consumers of television shows are completely ancillary to the primary market of buyers and sellers of advertising.

    If advertisers question things, and say, “nope, we’re not going to buy those ads from you unless you get better measurement,” then it’s a light.

    It’s not that they don’t wind up putting pressure on Nielsen to change things. But as far as I can tell neither the broadcasters or advertisers are hung up about the sample and the measurement, they’re hung up over “of all the things we can measure, what’s the one we should actually PAY based on.”

    Our opinions really don’t count because we’re not the primary consumer of the Nielsen information, the broadcasters and the advertisers — the buyers and sellers that form the real market are. Only they can force major changes to Nielsen.

    Nielsen does have its competitors — Arbitron for local markets, TNS Media with set top box, etc, but Nielsen is still the leader and that’s because the primary market (advertisers and broadcasters) make them the leader. Will this always be the case? I have no idea, but it will be the case for a while and certainly through the 2008-2009 viewing season.

  • http://secondquest.tigersquest.com Lighthope

    >I think it is a stretch to suggest that over 250
    >million people disliked Jericho based off the
    >nielsen numbers. I would be surprised if 100
    >million people watched even one minute of
    >Jericho. Regardless, one cannot logically deduce
    >that virtually every American either liked the
    >show or disliked the show.

    It was slightly tongue-in-cheek. However, unlike cable, 260 million people had access to watch Jericho. 257 million decided not to. You can whittle down that number for some who don't watch TV, don't watch CBS, wasn't exposed to any advertising, etc. But that's still millions and millions and millions and MILLIONS of people who didn't care about Jericho. That's a fact you can't get around.

  • http://secondquest.tigersquest.com Lighthope

    >I think it is a stretch to suggest that over 250
    >million people disliked Jericho based off the
    >nielsen numbers. I would be surprised if 100
    >million people watched even one minute of
    >Jericho. Regardless, one cannot logically deduce
    >that virtually every American either liked the
    >show or disliked the show.

    It was slightly tongue-in-cheek. However, unlike cable, 260 million people had access to watch Jericho. 257 million decided not to. You can whittle down that number for some who don’t watch TV, don’t watch CBS, wasn’t exposed to any advertising, etc. But that’s still millions and millions and millions and MILLIONS of people who didn’t care about Jericho. That’s a fact you can’t get around.

  • whtline

    Everybody thinks that Nielsen boxes, Cable and Satellite are the only way people watch Networks. The truth is that millions of people still have antennas to watch CBS, NBC and ABC, even those with the above services. In many those services charge customers for local channels or have to have an antenna to get them. I should know because I have install hundreds of antennas over the years right in one of the largest markets NY and Long Island area. Now that HD is coming my phone is ringing off the hook. Now tell me how all those people that still have antennas are counted and what they watch? You won't believe this but people still have and use those VCR things. I wonder how many of those invisible people been watching Jericho all a long?

  • whtline

    Everybody thinks that Nielsen boxes, Cable and Satellite are the only way people watch Networks. The truth is that millions of people still have antennas to watch CBS, NBC and ABC, even those with the above services. In many those services charge customers for local channels or have to have an antenna to get them. I should know because I have install hundreds of antennas over the years right in one of the largest markets NY and Long Island area. Now that HD is coming my phone is ringing off the hook. Now tell me how all those people that still have antennas are counted and what they watch? You won’t believe this but people still have and use those VCR things. I wonder how many of those invisible people been watching Jericho all a long?

  • whtline

    Forgive my 4am grammer.

  • whtline

    Forgive my 4am grammer.

  • whtline

    This should make sence now…
    CBS thinks that Nielsen boxes, Cable and Satellite are the only way people watch Networks. The truth is that millions of people still have antennas to watch CBS, NBC and ABC, even those with the above services. In many areas those services charge customers for local channels or you have to have an antenna to get them. I should know because I have install hundreds of antennas over the years right in one of the largest markets NY and Long Island area. Now that HD is coming my phone is ringing off the hook. Now tell me how all those people that still have antennas are counted and what they watch? You won’t believe this but people still have and use those VCR things. I wonder how many of those invisible people been watching Jericho all a long?

  • whtline

    This should make sence now…
    CBS thinks that Nielsen boxes, Cable and Satellite are the only way people watch Networks. The truth is that millions of people still have antennas to watch CBS, NBC and ABC, even those with the above services. In many areas those services charge customers for local channels or you have to have an antenna to get them. I should know because I have install hundreds of antennas over the years right in one of the largest markets NY and Long Island area. Now that HD is coming my phone is ringing off the hook. Now tell me how all those people that still have antennas are counted and what they watch? You won’t believe this but people still have and use those VCR things. I wonder how many of those invisible people been watching Jericho all a long?

  • Danielle

    I think with nielsen, its never about counting EVERY person, but taking a large enough sampling of the population to try and gauge what people are watching for the most part. Its how a lot of scientific studies are done. It doesn't matter if you have an antenna or if you have direct tv or you have standard cable.

  • Danielle

    I think with nielsen, its never about counting EVERY person, but taking a large enough sampling of the population to try and gauge what people are watching for the most part. Its how a lot of scientific studies are done. It doesn’t matter if you have an antenna or if you have direct tv or you have standard cable.

  • DrRJP

    I participated as a Neilsen household about three years ago. Although it does have a way to indicate that a viewed program was time-shifted, aka Tivo-ed, I have to believe that networks DO NOT use this data in programming decisions because VIEWERS FAST-FORWARD THROUGH COMMERCIALS

  • DrRJP

    I participated as a Neilsen household about three years ago. Although it does have a way to indicate that a viewed program was time-shifted, aka Tivo-ed, I have to believe that networks DO NOT use this data in programming decisions because VIEWERS FAST-FORWARD THROUGH COMMERCIALS

  • DrRJP

    I participated as a Neilsen household about three years ago. Although it does have a way to indicate that a viewed program was time-shifted, aka Tivo-ed, I have to believe that networks DO NOT use this data in programming decisions because VIEWERS FAST-FORWARD THROUGH COMMERCIALS, and, as we all know, the almighty advertising dollar is what dictates the success or failure of a show.

    Jericho COULD BE SAVED, despite its low ratings, if enough high-paying OR high-profile advertisers were to throw their finiancial support behind it.

    Of those who wrote to CBS execs pleading with them to save JERICHO, how many also write to the show’s sponsors?

    I did and I SUBMITTED RECEIPTS showing that I had purchased their products and telling them that it was SOLELY because I saw them advertised on JERICHO.

    I’m glad that the JERICHO finale left the door open for more episodes because it still would be a ground-breaking TV show given that the vaunted (and awfully cheesy) “24” series could never cover the same scenario of domestic terrorism emanating from within our government that leads to a hostile takeover by a corporate-military conglomerate.

    Suffice to say that no movie or previous television entry has ever dealt in depth with the American psyche to the way that JERICHO has.

    JERICHO showed just how plausible it would be for an evil, self-serving conglomerate to take total control of our country, given how much partial control they have.

    But, in this series, the PLOT is secondary to the PEOPLE, by illustrating the strength of the human spirit to be free and to be the architect of its own destiny.

    “A country by the people and for the people” is not just some slick line from a politician — it is the fabric of our free society.

    And, by showing the ideological differences between Jericho and New Bern, it forces us to re-evaluate where to draw the line between freedom and anarchy, between living by our own principles, or by conveniently suspending them.

    JERICHO showed us that it is better to die as a PATIROT than to live as a TRAITOR, to be true to our ideals, and not to our selfishness.

    At some point in the future, a point I never hope comes, where each and every American will have to defend the principles and ideals of our country against those who would take them away.

    JERICHO is a show that put its viewers above all else, just as the town by the same name put its citizens above all else.

    Despite its short run, JERICHO is a series like M*A*S*H that could seemingly run without end, but did not only because we know that the real Korean War ended. With JERICHO, we would never know how or when a “New Civil War” might end.

    Until Ken Burns produced his landmark series on the first American Civil War, most of the TV world knew virtually nothing about it.

    Likewise, CBS could learn a lesson from networks like the History channel and Discovery that offer shows with educational value as well as entertainment value.

    I am hopeful that JERICHO will find a home on another network, one that knows a good thing when it sees it.

  • DrRJP

    I participated as a Neilsen household about three years ago. Although it does have a way to indicate that a viewed program was time-shifted, aka Tivo-ed, I have to believe that networks DO NOT use this data in programming decisions because VIEWERS FAST-FORWARD THROUGH COMMERCIALS, and, as we all know, the almighty advertising dollar is what dictates the success or failure of a show.

    Jericho COULD BE SAVED, despite its low ratings, if enough high-paying OR high-profile advertisers were to throw their finiancial support behind it.

    Of those who wrote to CBS execs pleading with them to save JERICHO, how many also write to the show's sponsors?

    I did and I SUBMITTED RECEIPTS showing that I had purchased their products and telling them that it was SOLELY because I saw them advertised on JERICHO.

    I'm glad that the JERICHO finale left the door open for more episodes because it still would be a ground-breaking TV show given that the vaunted (and awfully cheesy) “24” series could never cover the same scenario of domestic terrorism emanating from within our government that leads to a hostile takeover by a corporate-military conglomerate.

    Suffice to say that no movie or previous television entry has ever dealt in depth with the American psyche to the way that JERICHO has.

    JERICHO showed just how plausible it would be for an evil, self-serving conglomerate to take total control of our country, given how much partial control they have.

    But, in this series, the PLOT is secondary to the PEOPLE, by illustrating the strength of the human spirit to be free and to be the architect of its own destiny.

    “A country by the people and for the people” is not just some slick line from a politician — it is the fabric of our free society.

    And, by showing the ideological differences between Jericho and New Bern, it forces us to re-evaluate where to draw the line between freedom and anarchy, between living by our own principles, or by conveniently suspending them.

    JERICHO showed us that it is better to die as a PATIROT than to live as a TRAITOR, to be true to our ideals, and not to our selfishness.

    At some point in the future, a point I never hope comes, where each and every American will have to defend the principles and ideals of our country against those who would take them away.

    JERICHO is a show that put its viewers above all else, just as the town by the same name put its citizens above all else.

    Despite its short run, JERICHO is a series like M*A*S*H that could seemingly run without end, but did not only because we know that the real Korean War ended. With JERICHO, we would never know how or when a “New Civil War” might end.

    Until Ken Burns produced his landmark series on the first American Civil War, most of the TV world knew virtually nothing about it.

    Likewise, CBS could learn a lesson from networks like the History channel and Discovery that offer shows with educational value as well as entertainment value.

    I am hopeful that JERICHO will find a home on another network, one that knows a good thing when it sees it.

  • http://www.theshortbusriders.org Brian

    Here were the problems that doomed Jericho before the season even started:

    1. Lack of advertising for the new season
    2. Horrible time slot
    3. Strange starting time (time of year) for a show.
    3. Stiff competition in that time slot
    4. The first three episodes were leaked so a lot of people got a taste of the show before they could watch it on tv.
    5. Serialized dramas usually don’t pick up massive amounts of viewers in later seasons.

    Yes I love the show, yes I think the rating systems are flawed and that stations and advertisers put too much stock into the rating systems themselves. However they do have some basis in statistical fact, that being said they do have a right to do with the show as they wish. Its sad that shows like this, Firefly, which I still believe is one of the best written shows in the past 20 years of television, and other niche shows such as Drive never get a chance to get their audience. Jericho at least got that chance, so we can at least be happy about that.

  • http://www.theshortbusriders.org Brian

    Here were the problems that doomed Jericho before the season even started:

    1. Lack of advertising for the new season
    2. Horrible time slot
    3. Strange starting time (time of year) for a show.
    3. Stiff competition in that time slot
    4. The first three episodes were leaked so a lot of people got a taste of the show before they could watch it on tv.
    5. Serialized dramas usually don't pick up massive amounts of viewers in later seasons.

    Yes I love the show, yes I think the rating systems are flawed and that stations and advertisers put too much stock into the rating systems themselves. However they do have some basis in statistical fact, that being said they do have a right to do with the show as they wish. Its sad that shows like this, Firefly, which I still believe is one of the best written shows in the past 20 years of television, and other niche shows such as Drive never get a chance to get their audience. Jericho at least got that chance, so we can at least be happy about that.

  • http://www.theshortbusriders.org Brian

    By the way, everyone wants to bash the neislon system, if you really want to see a flawed system take a look at the credit rating industry. That makes the neilson system look like its an encyclopedia.

  • http://www.theshortbusriders.org Brian

    By the way, everyone wants to bash the neislon system, if you really want to see a flawed system take a look at the credit rating industry. That makes the neilson system look like its an encyclopedia.

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