Not many stream internet video to hardware devices

Categories: New TV Technology

Written By

May 29th, 2009

There's nothing really new here, and as much as it may seem otherwise, this is a dead horse I don't like continually beating.  But Dan Rayburn did a guest post for our friends at NewTeeVee and he highlights some specific numbers by streaming device/service and the snail's pace of growth does surprise me some.

Here are the highlights:

  • 8 million Internet-connected Xbox 360s in the U.S.
  • 1 million Xbox Live Gold members have downloaded the Netflix streaming app
  • 445,000 TiVos capable of getting Amazon or Netflix content, more that can receive YouTube
  • About 300,000 Roku units sold
  • Less than 50,000 Vudu units sold
  • Less than 500,000 Apple TVs sold
  • 3 million broadband-enabled TVs to be sold in the next two years
  • Less than 50,000 broadband-enabled Blu-ray players

There STILL are less than 500,000 Apple TV's out there.   When we started this site going on two years ago, I'd often basically say "Shut up about Apple TV,  there are less than five hundred thousand them!"   I know Steve Jobs always said that AppleTV was a hobby, but more people have a That's So Raven hobby  since more than three times as many people probably caught all or part of a That's So Raven rerun in the last 24 hours!

I am one of the few (not so proud, really) people who stream Internet video to a hardware device connected to my TV (other than a personal computer, and I have one of those connected, too!) and I know we have quite a few readers who also utilize the technology.

But if you think just because I stream and you stream, and everyone you know streams that everyone else is streaming, you're living in your own personalized echo chamber.  Hardly anyone is streaming to a hardware device, and for now, relative to overall video consumption, it's as insignificant as a rounding error, perhaps more insignificant.

 
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