Late Night TV Ratings For The Week Of April 30 - May 4, 2012

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

Written By

May 10th, 2012

To see past week's Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON GENERATE GAINS AS THEY DELIVER #1 RANKINGS FOR THE LATE-NIGHT WEEK OF APRIL 30-MAY 4

JAY HITS A SEVEN-WEEK HIGH IN 18-49 VIEWERS AND JIMMY DELIVERS HIS BIGGEST AUDIENCE IN 11 WEEKS

‘TONIGHT’ AND ‘LATE NIGHT’ TOP ‘Late Show’ AND ‘LATE Late Show’ RESPECTIVELY IN ALL KEY RATINGS CATEGORIES: ADULTS, MEN AND WOMEN 18-34, 18-49 AND 25-54, PLUS TOTAL VIEWERS

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – May 10, 2012 – NBC’s late-night lineup has generated #1 results for the week of April 30-May 4, delivering bigger audiences in adults 18-49 and total viewers than the time-period competition on ABC and CBS. At 11:35 p.m. ET, “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” topped CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" and ABC's combination of "Nightline" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live" for the week, while at 12:35 a.m., “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” bested CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and the second half of ABC’s “Kimmel” head to head. Note that Friday’s “Kimmel” was an encore.

“Tonight” out-delivered “Late Show” in all key categories -- adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers -- and Jimmy Fallon attracted bigger audiences than “Late Late Show” in every key category as well.

Jay generated his biggest 18-49 audience (1.045 million persons) in seven weeks (since the week of March 12-16) and Jimmy Fallon delivered his biggest 18-49 audience (699,000) and biggest overall audience (1.715 million) in 11 weeks (since February 13-17).

Through the first 33 weeks of the season, "Tonight" has increased its total-viewer margin over "Late Show" to 15 percent (3.716 million vs. 3.223 million), up from the year-ago season-to-date advantage of 8 percent. Jimmy Fallon has also established a total-viewer lead over "Late Late Show" this season of 15 percent (1.765 million vs. 1.533 million), up from last year's advantage of 0.3 percent. Jimmy has also increased his season-to-date lead over "Late Late Show" in adults 18-34, to 39 percent (276,000 vs. 198,000) up from last year's 23 percent, and in adults 25-54, to 11 percent (866,000 vs. 781,000) up from 2 percent at this point last season.

"Tonight" delivered a bigger 18-49 audience than "Late Show" for the 17th time in 20 weeks while Jimmy Fallon attracted a bigger 18-49 audience than "Late Late Show" for a 23rd week in a row.

WEEKLY AVERAGES
(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of April 30 – May 4. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share
CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET
ABC “Nightline,” 0.9/3

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET
ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/3*

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3
CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers
CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET
ABC “Nightline,” 3.9 million viewers

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET
ABC “Kimmel,” 1.9 million viewers*

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers
CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers*

* Friday’s “Last Call” and “Kimmel” were encores.

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 3 share
CBS “Late Show,” 0.8/3

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET
ABC “Nightline,” 0.9/3

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET
ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 0.6/3
CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.5/3

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 3.7 million viewers
CBS “Late Show,” 3.2 million viewers

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET
ABC “Nightline,” 3.9 million viewers

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET
ABC “Kimmel,” 1.8 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 1.8 million viewers
CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 1.0 million viewers

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF APRIL 30 – MAY 4

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.7
Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.5

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4 (in encore telecasts)

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9
Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.7

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.28 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.7 million
Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.8 million (in encore telecasts)

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million
Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.5 million

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  • pete

    Monikka,

    Lorne Michaels currently has the third highest rated show on NBC and despite the current network declines, a 3.1 for SNL in the demo is a success.

    Regarding “Late Night”, Michaels picked two ratings winners – Conan and Fallon. Lorne Michaels was not involved with “The Tonight Show with Conan O’Brien”.

    Misogynist? That’s impossible – cause you’re no lady.

  • Diana Santiago

    Andy Richter on Howard Stern was great. Among other things, Andy described how Jay lied to his face (to be exact, to his ear) when he was forced by Zucker to call Leno and apologize for saying Jay was not classy about his statement to B & C in November 2009.

  • Aaron

    Conan was at TBS’s upfronts in New York so I wonder if he shot any remotes there.

  • Chris

    I had forgotten about the B&C episode…not that Jay had said those stupid, insensitive things, but that NBC actually had the audacity to make Andy Richter apologize for his comments. Hindsight has shown Richter was spot on the money.

  • Brad

    Wasn’t that when Leno said he was going to call Conan and Andy obviously checked with Conan to see if he did, and Conan never recieved a phone call? I read it in Bill Carter’s latest late night book.

  • Chris

    Right.

    And more baffling, in the interview with B&C Leno acknowledges that some critics have pounded him, but that in his last six months at 11:30 he was being called a genius. Funny, nobody ever found where anybody called him a genius.

    Leno had every right to be angry at how he was treated by NBC, but he sure did shoot himself in the foot repeatedly to the point where few would probably trust him again.

  • Mike

    Three magic words…pay and play!

    Jay got paid and he played. All there is to it. Had he not had that clause in his contract Leno would be hoofin on Dancing with the Stars.

  • Brad

    That was an amazing clause in his contract. Whoever came up with that was an absolute genius! And sense Leno has no manager, all the credit goes to Leno. Still can’t believe NBC was desperate enough to sign him. I mean, they had to expect their affiliates wouldn’t be pleased having The Jay Leno Show EVERY WEEKDAY @ 10pm! If I was NBC, I would forced all the affiliates to except The Jay Leno Show with a 2 year commitment. Give them a small bonuses for doing so to compensate for the poor lead-in (which was only a little less favorable than today’s NBC). Anyways, to late to go back.

  • Brad

    If I could ask Conan something, I would ask why he didn’t feel like having his Tonight show, having everything stay the same way, budget and all, but having it at midnight was such a terrible thing? How it wasn’t fair. Jay was offered a half-hour late night show starting at 11:30pm. Would Conan have wanted that half-hour instead of a full hour? We never found out what Conan really wanted except that “either everything stays the same or I’m leaving”.

    Personally, I would’ve accepted midnight but extended my contract and enforce Jay gone from NBC after his contract is up. I am pretty sure NBC would have committed to that rather than having to pay $40 million.

  • Brad

    Oh, one more thing! Just like Jimmy Kimmel said he would have done if he was in Conan’s shoes, I have would fired all my lawyers. This is the second time they failed to make a good contract. Remember the first time when they took a NBC producer’s word that they would have long-term job security for the Late Night show back when it began, but then the producer broke his word and signed the show for 13-weeks a contract. Never, EVER, in show business do you take somebody’s word when it comes to these big commitments. George Lopez should have read Bill Carter’s ‘The Late Shift’ and realized this so he would’ve gotten a written statement of Koonin promising him a third season if he would call Conan to convince him to come to TBS.

  • Mike

    You may be right. And you’re right that it was very smart for Jay to have that contract…and an incredible oversight that Conan didn’t have 11:30 guaranteed. If he did Leno would have been at 3AM or on one of the afternoon soaps.

    And Leno did get a two year guarantee, which dwindled to one year…than a matter of weeks.

    One unanswered question is whether his 10PM crapfest still made money for NBC. He mostly hit his modest ratings targets.

    I probably would not have accepted the push back to midnight…and might not have settled like Conan did, taking it to the courts…except his staff needed help right away.

    But soon after Leno’s return his numbers sunk lower than Conan’s and continue to slide. And Leno’s show supposedly costs much more. Who knows what the right answer was.

  • Brad

    The point of having The Jay Leno Show was to not keep investing in 10pm drama that did not work. NBC was tired of wasting their money and time in all these new shows. FOX was number one at the time (I believe), and noticed that they end their shows at 10pm and go straight to the news. Zucker had the idea of having not multiple 10pm new shows, but one late night show. I thought it was a brilliant idea. Jay’s ratings was a bit lower than expected, but all the producers said that he would gain ground and stability once all the networks went into re-runs, something he noted in his NBC speech about the late night debacle back in early 2010. I think his show definitely made money. I think NBC was doing much better then than now. If they had stuck it out another year, they would have added The Voice and that would’ve made NBC a quite profitable network, unlike what it is now which is they were down on their luck and The Voice saved the network.

    I do know this. If both Leno and Conan leave late night in 2014, which they both very might, the right answer would have been compromising. If Leno leaves and Conan stays at TBS, Conan may have made the right move.

  • Brad

    This is my beat on what would have happened if they had been a compromise:
    Leno would have gone up against Letterman just like it has always been (even though Letterman liked beating Conan’s Tonight show), Conan would have gone up against Kimmel (and easily win in my opinion), Fallon would get pushed back to 1am (and possible do alright), Carson Daly would switch networks and gone to ABC and get the same exact ratings (or slightly better), but probably would have lost the chance to host The Voice because of the switch (which would have been a MAJOR lost), and Lopez would get to stay on TBS and do just fine.

  • Chris

    Indeed…NBC saved a lot of money on scripted drama…and a lot of money on comedy because there was none to be found on his 10PM show.

    It was a waste of film and airspace.

  • Diana Santiago

    Brad, Howard asked that same question to Andy today. Basically he said that the push to midnight was a gateway to get them out anyway.

    I think NBC is still paying in terms of ratings the decision of “dismantling” the 10:00 pm block. Even the Spanish Univision is beating NBC.

  • Diana Santiago

    I think Conan won something over Jay on TBS: he owns his show.

  • Brad

    Chris: As main TV analyst said, when NBC cancelled The Jay Leno Show, it was like canceling five TV shows because now five hour-long slots needed to be filled. That was an enormous devastation to NBC. That’s why I wished Zucker and NBC had made a contract with their affiliates, treated them nicely, and paid them some bonus money, so they could of had some time to figure out if the experiment was worth while, and if it wasn’t, they would have to time to plan out some new TV shows. Instead, they threw crazy new shows like Cape, The Playboy Club, The Firm, and all sorts of dramas that never stuck.

    Diana: Conan did get a lot when he went to TBS, but it might all go to waste if he isn’t renewed after this contract. However, if what Andy said was very true, then it was inevitable that Conan was eventually doomed either way (assuming TBS doesn’t work out). I really do hope Conan the best though. I really do.

  • Aaron

    Conan did well in the ratings on Monday and Tuesday. I know that a lot of college students had finals last week, so that may explain the short slump in the ratings.

  • Aaron

    When Jay Leno came back to the Tonight Show, what happened to all the energy in the show? Even though I don’t like his show, it at least had some energy to it, most notably the fast jibcam shots during Jay’s entrance. Did the show get a new director who got rid of all that or what?

  • Gary Middleton

    Aaron, maybe the different and larger studio played into that. I’m a huge believer that bigger is not better in this medium.

    I also believe strongly that the departure of Kevin Eubanks and his entire band was disastrous to the feel of the program. Was confirmed for me this week that the band was let go when Kevin left, they did not leave voluntarily. This was an incredibly unwise decision. They found Kevin within Branford’s band. Johnny found Doc within Skitch Henderson’s band.

    I appreciate to some extent what they were trying to do with the Rickey Minor thing, levering his existing relationships in the pop music world. But it’s been too inorganic.

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