Late Night TV Ratings For The Week Of May 7 - May 11, 2012

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

Written By

May 17th, 2012

To see past week's Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON DELIVER #1 FINISHES FOR THE LATE-NIGHT WEEK OF MAY 7-11

 

 

‘TONIGHT’ AND ‘LATE NIGHT’ DELIVER BIGGER 18-49 AND TOTAL-VIEWER AUDIENCES THAN THE ABC AND CBS TIME-PERIOD COMPETITION

 

SEASON TO DATE, JAY HAS STRETCHED HIS TOTAL-VIEWER LEAD OVER ‘Late Show’ TO 15 PERCENT FROM THE YEAR-AGO 9 PERCENT AND JIMMY FALLON HAS INCREASED HIS MARGIN OVER ‘LATE Late Show’ TO 15 PERCENT FROM 0.5 PERCENT

 

Last Call WITH CARSON DALY’ HITS A FIVE-WEEK HIGH IN 18-49 VIEWERS AND A FOUR-WEEK HIGH IN TOTAL VIEWERS

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – May 17, 2012 – NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” has delivered #1 rankings in viewers 18-49 and total viewers for the week of May 7-11, generating bigger audiences in adults 18-49 and total viewers than its time-period competition of CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" and ABC's combination of "Nightline" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live."

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET, NBC’s "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" ranked #1 ahead of CBS's "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson" and head to head versus ABC’s "Kimmel" in viewers 18-49 and total viewers, delivering bigger audiences than “Late Late Show” in every key ratings category: adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

 

At 1:35 a.m. ET, NBC’s “Last Call with Carson Daly” delivered its largest 18-49 audience (422,000) in five weeks, since the week of April 2-6, and its biggest overall audience (964,000) in four weeks, since the week of April 9-13.

 

Through the first 34 weeks of the season, "Tonight" has increased its total-viewer margin over "Late Show" to 15 percent (3.710 million vs. 3.218 million), up from the year-ago season-to-date advantage of 9 percent. Jimmy Fallon has also established a total-viewer lead over "Late Late Show" this season of 15 percent (1.764 million vs. 1.531 million), up from last year's advantage of 0.5 percent. Jimmy has also increased his season-to-date lead over "Late Late Show" in adults 18-34, to 41 percent (276,000 vs. 196,000) up from last year's 23 percent, and in adults 25-54, to 11 percent (864,000 vs. 778,000) up from 2 percent at this point last season.

 

"Tonight" delivered a bigger 18-49 audience than "Late Show" for the 18th time in 21 weeks while Jimmy Fallon attracted a bigger 18-49 audience than "Late Late Show" for a 24th week in a row.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of May 7-11. Ratings reflect "live plus same day" data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of "live plus seven day" data except for the two most recent weeks, which are "live plus same day.")

 

 

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

 

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Tonight," 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

 

CBS "Late Show," 0.7/3

 

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC "Nightline," 0.9/3

 

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC "Kimmel," 0.6/3*

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Late Night," 0.5/3

 

 

CBS "Late Late Show," 0.4/2

 

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Last Call," 0.3/2*

 

 

 

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Tonight," 3.4 million viewers

 

 

CBS "Late Show," 3.0 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC "Nightline," 3.8 million viewers

 

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC "Kimmel," 1.9 million viewers*

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Late Night," 1.6 million viewers

 

 

CBS "Late Late Show," 1.4 million viewers

 

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Last Call," 1.0 million viewers*

 

 

* Friday’s "Last Call" and "Kimmel" were encores.

 

 

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

 

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

 

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Tonight," 0.9 rating, 3 share

 

 

CBS "Late Show," 0.8/3

 

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC "Nightline," 0.9/3

 

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC "Kimmel," 0.5/2

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Late Night," 0.6/3

 

 

CBS "Late Late Show," 0.5/3

 

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Last Call," 0.3/2

 

 

 

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

 

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Tonight," 3.7 million viewers

 

 

CBS "Late Show," 3.2 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC "Nightline," 3.9 million viewers

 

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC "Kimmel," 1.8 million viewers

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Late Night," 1.8 million viewers

 

 

CBS "Late Late Show," 1.5 million viewers

 

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

 

NBC "Last Call," 1.0 million viewers

 

 

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF MAY 7-11

 

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

 

 

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, "The Daily Show," 0.7

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, "The Colbert Report," 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, "Conan," 0.4

 

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.28 million viewers

 

 

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

 

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. "The Daily Show," 1.6 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, "The Colbert Report," 1.2 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, "Conan," 0.8 million

 

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.1 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

###:

 

 
  • Brad

    I went over The Late Shift by Bill Carter and I have to agree with SB, something isn’t right. Mike Ortiz was only hired when Peter Lassally was telling Morton and Letterman that with no relationship with the NBC suits, they are not going to get any promotion to take over the Tonight show.

    I also agree with SB that Littlefield is thinking about their second thought on who should be the host of the Tonight show. People were growing weary of Leno/Kushnick at TTS. Letterman had made it public on TTS w/ Carson that he couldn’t imagine being a host for as long as Carson had. NBC had also found out how much Leno was willing to work to make his show better, that Leno really wouldn’t rest. That would explain why Littlefield made his decision of thinking long term and that Leno would be that guy.

    This could also explain why Ovitz had all these rules set in stone when accepting a contract with NBC, because he had been making them very clear to other networks like ABC, CBS, FBC, syndication, and everyone else. The big ones being that Letterman will be on at 11:30pm (that where ABC pulled out) and that he will be the owner of his show. Littlefield was hesitant by this contract and knowing Letterman was already not thinking longterm, NBC was going to run into this problem in the next few years, and that the show will be out of their control.

  • Gary Middleton

    My guess, jc, is 0.5 in this case is 0.6. Dave did a lot of weekly 0.6s last summer and he’s going into it a lot weaker than he did a year ago.

    0.49 for Conan last week, including a rerun.

  • Gary Middleton

    Brad, I guess Dave was doing what Dean Martin did a few decades earlier. Dean didn’t want to do a show for NBC. So he just asked for everything. The most ridiculous, laughable string of demands. Stuff he never expected NBC to agree to. In that case, NBC stunned him and said yes. So Dean wandered by the studio around showtime each week and winged it, as per his deal.

  • Gary Middleton

    Mary, thanks for bearing with me, I promise it’s coming!

  • Mike

    If you watch the Dean Martin shows on DVD (some complete ones were released this week), Dean’s attitude towards the show, making it almost all improv, makes it sparkle. Frankly, they’re having a hell of a good time.

    There’s little of that today…everything is scripted down to a breath. Letterman’s and Leno’s shows are among the worst. Each second is planned and scripted so much almost all fun is extinguished. (The only exception is Ferguson’s show.)

  • CHRIS

    Hard to believe that nobody has mentioned the significant anniversaries today…

    Twenty years ago today America said goodbye to Johnny Carson after almost thirty years as host of the Tonight Show. Carson would rarely be seen again.

    And twenty years ago this Friday, America noted the death of notable American comedian Jay Leno. When Jay Leno took the stage permanently at NBC, he was recognized as a pale imposter of the man once known as Jay Leno.

  • SD

    I really doubt if Letterman was ever much in consideration for NBC at 11:30. Most of the pinheads who ran the network weren’t interested because he wouldn’t stick his head up the you-know-what like Jay Leno would (and still does.)

    Letterman never did the schmoozing with network executives and with the affiliates. Leno would do everything to make them happy. And don’t forget the almost evil partnership between Leno and his manager. You’ll never convince me that Leno didn’t know the awful and vile things Helen Kushnick was planting in the press. But, like everybody else, Leno used her and threw her under the bus in time.

    Amazingly, Carson wasn’t consulted…if it were Carson’s decision it would have been Letterman by a mile.

    Dave just didn’t play the game right.

  • Mike
  • Gary Middleton

    “I really doubt if Letterman was ever much in consideration for NBC at 11:30. Most of the pinheads who ran the network weren’t interested because he wouldn’t stick his head up the you-know-what like Jay Leno would (and still does.)”

    15 years of late night ratings domination, plus ER, Frasier, Seinfeld, Friends, Law & Order, etc. suggests they were not such pinheads. Dave underestimated them.

  • Brad

    “Dave just didn’t play the game right”

    Exactly! You can’t expect to win the battle when you won’t cozy up with NBC executives. Like it mentions in The Late Shift, all Letterman did was push the NBC suits away so he could do his own thing. Of course Letterman was loyal to NBC and was never a problem, but all this gave Letterman was more of a reason for NBC to let him the show he wanted. This didn’t guarantee him TTS like he had hoped. As Peter Lassally point out to him, even though it was already too late, that isn’t how Hollywood works.

    I do find it fairly strange Leno was the guest host for all this time and wasn’t given Late Night and let Letterman take over the Tonight Show. I wonder if that was ever up for discussion. I do know NBC was interested in getting him a show sometime in the 80′s called The Jay Leno Show but the pilot was quite horrible from what Bill Carter describes in his sequel The War for Late Night.

  • CHRIS

    “I do know NBC was interested in getting him a show sometime in the 80?s called The Jay Leno Show but the pilot was quite horrible from what Bill Carter describes in his sequel The War for Late Night.”

    Indeed…and that should have given them a clue as to the quality of product he would give them for decades.

  • Brad

    That reminds me. When Leno was hosting his primetime show, The Jay Leno Show, what were the ratings of his lead-ins? I am curious what the percentage was his show took in so we could compare to Conan’s ratings and his TBS lead-ins. These shows along with The Daily Show are the only shows don’t/didn’t have the news as their lead-in.

  • Brad

    I found what I was looking for. A bit too complicated than what I was hoping. Basically NBC had The Jay Leno Show at 1.5 to 2.0 while his lead in were about 2.5 to 3.0. Here’s two examples…

    Tuesday Night
    http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2009/12/16/tuesday-broadcast-finals-ted-not-any-better-off-ncis-still-rules-night/36492/

    Thursday Night
    http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2009/12/04/thursday-broadcast-other-broadcast-shows-unchanged/35341/

  • Brad

    Gary, remember you were curious about having a poll on what people were thinking about the whole NBC late night fiasco. Are people upset with Leno, O’Brien, NBC? Well, I found a Marketers Survey on just that. This was really interesting. Here’s my summary:

    “Asked who was most damaged by the dustup, 75% chose NBC chief Jeff Zucker, trailed by Jay Leno at 18%. Conversely, 71% said Conan O’Brien came out of the showdown in the best shape, trailed by David Letterman at 14%.

    Perhaps most damning, 58% of the MediaLife poll respondents agreed on one point: “It was a spectacle like I’ve never seen before, proving just how poorly managed the company is. They should have never allowed O’Brien and Leno to let it play out like that on television.”" – MediaPost

    Who is responsible?

    NBC Management – 94%
    Jay Leno – 5%
    Conan O’Brien – 1%

    What should NBC have done?

    Kept Conan O’Brien – 47%
    Kept Jay Leno – 41%
    Keep both, by backing down after Conan objected to time slot move – 12%

    What did you think about Conan’s response?

    “It was fully Justified in view of NBC’s treatment of him” – 67%
    “It was understandable, but it made Conan look bad” – 18%
    “It was unprofessional” – 15%

    Summary Version
    http://tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com/2010/01/29/47-of-marketers-surveyed-think-nbc-should-have-kept-conan-over-leno/40501/

    Article Version – MediaPost
    http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/121496/

  • anonymous

    Kevin Eubanks made a guest appearance on The Tonight Show last night in a funny sketch. Looks like they are bringing him back in a limited capacity.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I found what I was looking for. A bit too complicated than what I was hoping. Basically NBC had The Jay Leno Show at 1.5 to 2.0 while his lead in were about 2.5 to 3.0.”

    Yes, it’s pretty hard to benchmark that vs. how, say, Conan holds a direct lead-in at 11. Conan is penalized because it’s later at night and audiences drop off. Jay is penalized because 10 p.m. competition is far more intense relative to the pacing of a talk show. No idea which factor is more prevalent.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Gary, remember you were curious about having a poll on what people were thinking about the whole NBC late night fiasco.”

    I’m surprised if it was me who said that, Brad, it’s been a long time since I found the topic interesting. I will suggest this. At the time, if the poll question was worded a certain way, you could get 99% to blame Jay Leno.

  • Brad

    Ah. I understand what your saying about the 9 to 10pm lead in vs the 10 to 11pm lead in. Can’t believe I didn’t take that into consideration.

    As for the poll, I’m pretty sure you were curious at why people had stop watching Leno. If it had to do anything with the Tonight Show fiasco. This is the only poll I just happened to find on the subject. It looks like people aren’t blaming Jay, they are just frustrated with NBC. But I agree with you, depending on what history you tell the public you are question, you can totally get them to blame jay.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Kevin Eubanks made a guest appearance on The Tonight Show last night in a funny sketch.”

    A national holiday is in order!

  • Gary Middleton

    “As for the poll, I’m pretty sure you were curious at why people had stop watching Leno.”

    Good chance it wasn’t me, Brad. The opinion I’ve put forward here has pretty consistently been that Jay’s trajectory was in place long before 2010. A combination of NBC’s steep decline, network TV’s steep decline, and Leno’s age. Dave’s numbers have crashed too.

    Give Jay ER instead of Awake on Thursdays and it’s a different equation.

© 2014 Tribune Digital Ventures