'

TV Ratings Sunday: NASCAR Wins Night, 'Harry's Law' Series Finale Down

Categories: '

Written By

May 28th, 2012

Scoreboard FOX NBC ABC CBS x
Adults 18-49: Rating/Share 2.1/8 0.8/3 0.7/2 0.6/2 x
Adults 18-34: Rating/Share x x x x x
Total Viewers (million) 6.93 4.22 2.97 4.61 x

-

Due to the nature of live sports programming the ratings for FOX (NASCAR) are approximate and subject to more than the typical adjustments in the final numbers. See below for more information on these Fast Affiliate Ratings.

FOX won the night in adults 18-49 and total viewers, against a line-up of mostly repeats on a slow Memorial Day weekend Sunday.

Sorry, only half hourly ratings to report today, due to the Memorial Day holiday. In the meantime, averaging these half hours into ratings for each show will often lead to errors.

Even with the final ratings adjustments likely for a live broadcast, FOX's  coverage of NASCAR is certain to top the night with both Adults 18-49 and total viewers.

On NBC, the series finale of Harry's Law is almost certain to finish down from a 1.0 for its last original episode on May 13 when the final ratings come in, for what will likely be a series low.

 

Broadcast primetime ratings for Sunday, May 27, 2012:

Time Net Show 18-49 Rating/Share Viewers (Millions)
7:00 FOX NASCAR Coca Cola 600 (Live) 1.9/8 6.92
ABC America's Funniest Home Videos - R 0.7/3 3.45
CBS 60 Minutes 0.6/3 5.98
NBC Dateline - R 0.5/2 3.31
7:30 FOX NASCAR Coca Cola 600 (Live) 1.9/8 6.74
ABC America's Funniest Home Videos - R 0.9/4 3.94
CBS 60 Minutes 0.7/3 6.09
NBC Dateline - R 0.6/3 3.72
8:00 FOX NASCAR Coca Cola 600  (Live) 2.1/8 6.76
NBC Harry's  Law (Series Finale) 0.7/3 5.70
ABC Duets - R 0.7/3 2.76
CBS Blue Bloods - R 0.4/1 3.65
8:30 FOX NASCAR Coca Cola 600 (Live) 2.1/8 6.75
NBC Harry's  Law (Series Finale) 0.6/2 5.92
ABC Duets - R 0.6/2 2.52
CBS Blue Bloods - R 0.4/1 3.70
9:00 FOX NASCAR Coca Cola 600 (Live) 2.1/7 6.99
NBC America's Got Talent - R 0.7/2 3.10
ABC Duets - R 0.7/2 2.79
CBS The Good Wife - R 0.5/2 4.25
9:30 FOX NASCAR Coca Cola 600 (Live) 2.3/7 7.43
ABC Duets - R 0.8/3 2.92
NBC America's Got Talent - R 0.7/2 3.42
CBS The Good Wife - R 0.5/2 4.46
10:00 NBC America's Got Talent - R 1.0/3 4.05
CBS CSI: Miami - R 0.7/2 4.27
ABC Rookie Blue - R 0.6/2 2.55
10:30 NBC America's Got Talent - R 1.2/4 4.55
CBS CSI: Miami - R 0.7/2 4.45
ABC Rookie Blue - R 0.7/2 2.86

-

Sunday's Ratings Via TV Media Insights
Nielsen TV Ratings: ©2012 The Nielsen Company. All Rights Reserved.

Definitions:

Fast Affiliate Ratings: These first national ratings, including demographics, are available at approximately 11 AM (ET) the day after telecast, and are released to subscribing customers daily. These data, from the National People Meter sample, are strictly time-period information, based on the normal broadcast network feed, and include all programming on the affiliated stations, sometimes including network programming, sometimes not. The figures may include stations that did not air the entire network feed, as well as local news breaks or cutaways for local coverage or other programming. Fast Affiliate ratings are not as useful for live programs and are likely to differ significantly from the final results, because the data reflect normal broadcast feed patterns. For example, with a World Series game, Fast Affiliate Ratings would include whatever aired from 8-11PM on affiliates in the Pacific Time Zone, following the live baseball game, but not game coverage that begins at 5PM PT. The same would be true of Presidential debates as well as live award shows and breaking news reports.

Rating: Estimated percentage of the universe of TV households (or other specified group) tuned to a program in the average minute. Ratings are expressed as a percent.

Share (of Audience): The percent of households (or persons) using television who are tuned to a specific program, station or network in a specific area at a specific time. (See also, Rating, which represents tuning or viewing as a percent of the entire population being measured.)

Time Shifted Viewing – Program ratings for national sources are produced in three streams of data – Live, Live+Same Day (Live+SD) and Live+7 Day. Time shifted figures account for incremental viewing that takes place with DVRs. Live+Same Day (Live+SD) include viewing during the same broadcast day as the original telecast, with a cut-off of 3:00AM local time when meters transmit daily viewing to Nielsen for processing. Live+7 Day ratings include incremental viewing that takes place during the 7 days following a telecast.

For more information see Numbers 101 and Numbers 102.

 
  • Anthony Parello (AP076)

    @Carm
    “I hope NBC renews Harry’s Law! It is the best show on TV right now!!!
    Drama, Comedy and intrigue all in one show.
    PLEASE NBC renew this show!!”

    There is absolutely no chance, none, zero of Harry’s Law returning to NBC. It had its chance and then some. NBC has a full production slate of new scripted shows next season.

    Sorry about your favorite show.

  • Anthony Parello (AP076)

    AO’s Sock Puppet Account

    Truer words cannot have been said about this HL “issue”. Sadly few of its fans will grasp what you are writing They way they talk I almost expect a million person (walker) march on NBC any day now.

  • Josh

    Harry’s Law was ruined from season 1 to to season 2. They took away the fun quirkiness and tried to introduce to much seriousness. Then I also didn’t like how they treated the young lawyer being complete asshats to him all the time and that character getting dumped on all the time. The show went from giving me a smile to making me bitter and angry. That is why I turned it off. Have not watched it since the fall.

  • SarahL

    @Anthony Parello (AP076)

    NBC gave the show 3 different time slot shots in an effort to find success for the show which they badly wanted (and do for all their shows) but it just didn’t happen. The shows was very nurtured. Fox, CBS, and ABC would have all cancelled this show long before NBC did. In fact they probably would not have brought it back for the second season it got.

    Exactly. The Harry’s Law fans should be grateful that NBC give the show a second season with its low demos. Instead all they do is whinge.

  • Richard

    What NBC did with giving Harry’s Law is no better or worse than what they did giving Chuck season after season after season when it’s ratings weren’t any good either.

    But all that I don’t care about. I come to the ratings threads still but I gave up understanding why people watch what they do. I have just learned one thing over the last few years esp. is that it is just not worth trying out new shows on the networks anymore. This season I tried out more than I have in a long time. Only one of them survived and that was Smash and it is a boring mess that I gave up on after 5 eppys. Everything else I gave a try didn’t get through this season or picked up for next.

    I won’t make that mistake again. Next year I am not even going to try new network shows at all — no matter how good they sound. I will stick with cable where evidently the rating part is not as risky or something as I have seen many quality scripted shows on cable get more of a chance than they ever would on the networks.

    Harry’s Law never had great ratings but it was a show I enjoyed. I loved all the characters both in the 1st and 2nd seasons. I will miss it.

    The networks, cable channels etc. can give the Khardasians, the Jersey Shore types, the Housewives, and all that type as many shows as they want but I will never watch any of them. I sampled them and they are utterly boring and non-entertaining. Give me a good scripted show or at least a good reality show and I will watch it.

    And don’t go judging as being a TV snob. Many of the quality top rated shows I find utterly unentertaining too. The Good Wife is one of the most boring shows ever put on TV. And Modern Family no matter how many episodes I watch I never laugh. But Community I love but NBC lost me with it was taken off the schedule I forgot about it and never started back watching.

    I am down to 2 shows left on the networks after all the cancellations and renewals this year. I will most likely finish them out next year as I am sure one of them will end next year. But as for The CW, Fox, NBC, CBS, and ABC I am done giving them chance after chance. I know you can’t afford to give shows time to build an audience anymore, but how in the world do they ever build an audience if you don’t give them a chance.

    Anyway goodbye Harry’s Law just another show I will miss in a long line of them from the last few years of network television. I don’t remember a time in my life (and yes I am older but still in the desired demo) that I have ever said goodbye to so many shows in just a few years.

  • Richard

    Oh and SarahL and Anthony Parello,

    How can you count the 3 different timeslots as a benefit and something that fans should be thankful for.

    How in the world can a show build an audience when the network moves it that many times in a short time. Why do you think that some shows succeed? They stay in the timeslots that allow people to get accustomed to watching them.

    The timeslot changes hurt as some viewers of the show may already have something they watch in the new timeslot. So they are forced to choose. If you lose some of them you take a big risk of picking up enough new viewers to replace them. For instance I never missed an episode of CSI until this year when CBS moved it. I was forced to choose between SVU and CSI. We don’t own a DVR so my wife and I chose to continue with SVU. The same thing happened when CBS moved my favorite comedy show from Monday to Thursday.

    So I blame the timeslot moves and definitely not thankful for them at all.

  • xwiseguyx

    I still remain amazed at the disdain people have on this forum for any show that skews older. (As if they are never going to be outside the demo themselves.) When one points out that a show skews older, it’s usually written in the same tone as if one had herpes.

    People should continue to question the research used determine ad rates because it makes little sense that a group with a lesser amount of discretionary income is coveted. What 18-34 is going to buy a frickin Mercedes Benz? Ri-di-cu-lous.

    The fact that Harry’s Law didn’t get renewed is no skin off my back because I wasn’t a fan (as much as I loved previous Kelley shows), but the fact that media fawns over crap like 90210 remakes and Gossip Girl, which virtually no one watched here and continuously was renewed year after year is the true travesty regarding network television.

  • Joseph

    Wasn’t “60 Minutes” a rerun??

  • Anthony Parello (AP076)

    @Richard
    “How can you count the 3 different timeslots as a benefit and something that fans should be thankful for.
    How in the world can a show build an audience when the network moves it that many times in a short time. Why do you think that some shows succeed? They stay in the timeslots that allow people to get accustomed to watching them.”

    You logic is so flawed it is incredible. Successful shows stay in their time slots because they are guess what successful. Failures are moved in an effort to grow an audience elsewhere hoping the fans will follow it and that more new fans will discover it.

    You are wrong. NBC moved it in an effort to save it not ruin it.
    It ran its entire first season, from January until April, I believe at 10pm on Mondays.
    After falling ratings and barely eking out a renewal NBC decided to give it an even better at a more viewed TV hour 9pm on Wednesdays from September to January. The ratings continued to fall.

    Rather than canceling it outright like it did some better rated shows on its own network or banishing it to Saturday Night NBC gave it a third chance to build an audience and it failed to do so.

  • Steve

    @ Anthony Parello

    Harry’s Law had 3 different timeslots…..Mondays, Wednesdays and Sundays. When it moved from Wednesdays to Sundays in Season 2 it maintained it’s 7-9 million viewers weekly, which means that the show had a following. Usually when shows get shifted around they usually lose viewership, but Harry’s Law was consistent viewer wise.

    NBC cancelled so many shows and is relying on new shows to be hits. The renewed “Smash”, “Whitney” and “Grimm” were the only new shows NBC renewed so how do they expect to renew more new shows next year?

    NBC should have kept Harry’s Law and moved to to Friday nights after Grimm or even on Saturday nights–at least NBC would have viewers. Better to stick with what you know rather than what you don’t.

    @Richard
    “How can you count the 3 different timeslots as a benefit and something that fans should be thankful for.
    How in the world can a show build an audience when the network moves it that many times in a short time. Why do you think that some shows succeed? They stay in the timeslots that allow people to get accustomed to watching them.”

    You logic is so flawed it is incredible. Successful shows stay in their time slots because they are guess what successful. Failures are moved in an effort to grow an audience elsewhere hoping the fans will follow it and that more new fans will discover it.

    You are wrong. NBC moved it in an effort to save it not ruin it.
    It ran its entire first season, from January until April, I believe at 10pm on Mondays.
    After falling ratings and barely eking out a renewal NBC decided to give it an even better at a more viewed TV hour 9pm on Wednesdays from September to January. The ratings continued to fall.

    Rather than canceling it outright like it did some better rated shows on its own network or banishing it to Saturday Night NBC gave it a third chance to build an audience and it failed to do so.

  • Riff Rafferty

    First off, SarahL is a clown. And probably 13. On that we can all agree.

    Secondly, I had many suggestions for how to improve “Harry’s” demos, how to lower the 63-year-old median age. NBC did none of them.

    Thirdly, the show was bounced all around the schedule for no reason (“The Playboy Club,” “Rock Center” – gimme a break), never really given a good lead-in (“The Cape” and “The Event” were wretched trash for braindead fanboys; “Free Agents” was DOA), all the while always building from whatever lead-in it had, and dumped into time slots this season where NBC has had problems.

    Fourthly, NBC dumped every single scripted show they don’t own at least a piece of. Don’t single this one out, @$$holes.

    Finally, their new scripted shows (and I spent my week on vacation watching every f#ck!n’ one — and boy am I NOT in a good mood after THAT) are ATROCIOUS. Probably the poorest development they’ve EVER slopped together. I am ASTOUNDED at how they could make so much inept, badly-acted crap and subject the public to it and, like, think any of it is going to do ANYTHING in the ratings, be it households or whatever they can “monetize.” These shows are going to BOMB MISERABLY. And I’m going to be there to laugh right in their face when that happens. Because they have absolutely NOTHING on the shelf that can even pass as a utility player now. This is how you run a network, right? Cancel a hundred shows every season and then throw a hundred more at the wall next season just to see if anything sticks? Right?

  • AO’s Sock Puppet Account

    The show was failing, so NBC moved it around to save it (or so that it could do less harm elsewhere). Would you people have preferred it been canceled outright? No? Then stop whining.

    If you think that you can judge “quality” then you’re not thinking.

© 2014 Tribune Digital Ventures