Science’s 'Mars Landing 2012: The New Search for Life' Soars Among Olympic Stars

Categories: Network TV Press Releases

Written By

August 8th, 2012

via press release:

 

SCIENCE’s MARS Landing 2012: The New Search for Life SOARS AMONG OLYMPIC STARS

--Special Presentation Featuring Same-Day Footage from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab Attracts 1.3 Million Viewers for Historic Landing Despite Olympic Competition--

 

(Silver Spring, Md.)—The Olympic stranglehold on U.S. viewing audiences took time out for an even more historic event on the evening of August 6; as a dream team of engineers and astrophysicists secured an impressive audience despite direct competition from the U.S. Men’s Basketball Team. On Monday night, SCIENCE’s airings of MARS LANDING 2012: THE NEW SEARCH FOR LIFE attracted 1.3 million unique viewers across the night. For the 10:00 PM ET premiere, SCIENCE placed among the top three rated non-fiction cable networks in the hour with the key demographic of men 25 to 54. The broadcast was SCIENCE’s third-highest rated of 2012 with that audience and the network also matched its highest-rated Monday prime performance of 2012 with persons 25 to 54.

 

The world followed the landmark event of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft, Curiosity, as it transported the largest-ever landing craft and research payload that could be the key to discovering life on Mars. With MARS LANDING 2012: THE NEW SEARCH FOR LIFE, SCIENCE provided an exclusive same-day look at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) as it executed “the most complex Mars mission to date.”

 

SCIENCE was on the ground with key leaders of the initiative at JPL at the California Institute of Technology, garnering first-hand interviews as the milestone mission touched down. Hosts Dan Riskin and Ziya Tong were embedded as the team attempted to land Curiosity in Mars’ Gale Crater. MARS LANDING 2012: THE NEW SEARCH FOR LIFE is a co-production between SCIENCE and Discovery Canada.

 

“This impressive viewership goes to show that the American audiences are as passionate for Mars exploration as we are at SCIENCE,” said Debbie Adler Myers, General Manager and Executive Vice President of SCIENCE. “It was an honor to be involved in this historic event that kept the world in rapt attention. SCIENCE will be there for the first human steps on the Red Planet and all points in between.”

 

MARS LANDING 2012: THE NEW SEARCH FOR LIFE is executive produced by Kelly McKeown for Exploration Production Inc. Barb Ustina was producer for Exploration Production, Inc. For SCIENCE, Josh Berkley is executive producer, Bernadette McDaid is vice president of production, and Debbie Adler Myers is general manager and executive vice president.

 

About SCIENCE:

SCIENCE, a division of Discovery Communications, Inc. (NASDAQ: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK), is home for the thought provocateur, the individual who is unafraid to ask the killer questions of “how” and “why not.” The network is a playground for those with audacious intellects and features programming willing to go beyond imagination to explore the unknown. Guided by curiosity, SCIENCE looks for innovation in mysterious new worlds as well as in its own backyard. SCIENCE and the SCIENCE HD simulcast reach more than 68 million U.S. households. The network also features high-traffic online and social media destinations, including ScienceChannel.com, facebook.com/Science Channel and twitter.com/Science Channel.

 

About Discovery Communications

Discovery Communications (Nasdaq: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK) is the world’s #1 nonfiction media company reaching more than 1.5 billion cumulative subscribers in 210 countries and territories. Discovery is dedicated to satisfying curiosity through 130-plus worldwide television networks, led by Discovery Channel, TLC, Animal Planet, Science and Investigation Discovery, as well as US joint venture networks OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network, The Hub and 3net, the first 24-hour 3D network. Discovery also is a leading provider of educational products and services to schools and owns and operates a diversified portfolio of digital media services, including HowStuffWorks.com. For more information, please visit www.discoverycommunications.com.

 
  • AppleStinx

    We get pictures from Curiosity faster than we get news of Olympic events on NBC.

  • The End

    @AppleStinx

    They should of sent the Rover to the Velodrome.

  • Wretch Fossil

    Numerous Martian fossil cells have been discovered, such as this one:http://wretchfossil.blogspot.tw/2011/10/mars-meteorite-alh84001-contains.html

    Why didn’t NASA take a close look at the mermaid statue on Mars after NASA found it? NASA just want to do it step-by-step in order to milk as much as possible.

  • Joseph

    Wretch Fossil:

    Maybe Orson Welles put up the Mermaid statue on Mars!

    :)

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