Late Night TV Ratings For September 17-21 & The 2011-2012 Broadcast Year

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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September 27th, 2012

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

 

Via NBC's Press Release

NBC’S ‘Tonight Show’ AND ‘LATE NIGHT’ SCORE #1 FINISHES FOR THE 2011-12 BROADCAST YEAR
JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON DELIVER BIGGER AUDIENCES THAN THE ABC AND CBS TIME-PERIOD COMPETITION IN ALL KEY CATEGORIES: ADULTS, MEN AND WOMEN 18-34, 18-49 AND 25-54, PLUS TOTAL VIEWERS

FOR THE BROADCAST YEAR, JAY INCREASES HIS TOTAL-VIEWER LEAD OVER ‘Late Show’ TO 23 PERCENT FROM THE YEAR-AGO 15 PERCENT; JIMMY FALLON STRETCHES HIS MARGIN OVER ‘LATE Late Show’ TO 22 PERCENT , UP FROM LAST YEAR’S 7 PERCENT

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – September 27, 2012 – NBC’s late-night stars have concluded the 2011-12 broadcast year with #1 finishes ahead of the ABC and CBS time-period competition, with "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno" generating bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” and ABC’s combination of “Nightline” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” head to head for their hour in every key ratings category: adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers. And at 12:35 a.m. ET, “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” also delivered bigger audiences in every key category versus CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and for its head-to-head half-hour versus ABC’s “Kimmel.”

For the broadcast year, “Tonight” and “Late Night” stretched their leads over “Late Show” and “Late Late Show” respectively in total viewers and key demos and dramatically increased those margins in the just-completed third quarter of 2012.

For the 2011-12 broadcast year, "Tonight" stretched its total-viewer margin over "Late Show" to 23 percent (3.641 million vs. 2.972 million), up from the year-ago season-to-date advantage of 15 percent, while increasing its 25-54 advantage to 11 percent (1.391 million vs. 1.250 million) from last year’s 10 percent and its 18-34 lead to 26 percent (345,000 vs. 274,000) from last year’s 25 percent.

Jimmy Fallon finished the 2011-12 year with a total-viewer lead over "Late Late Show" of 22 percent (1.741 million vs. 1.426 million), up from last year's advantage of 7 percent. Jimmy also increased his season lead over "Late Late Show" in adults 18-49 to 24 percent (700,000 vs. 564,000), up from last year’s 22 percent; in adults 18-34 to 56 percent (274,000 vs. 176,000), up from last year's 31 percent; and in adults 25-54 to 18 percent (837,000 vs. 712,000), up from 9 percent last season.

In the just-completed third quarter of 2012, Jay increased his lead over “Late Late Show” in total viewers to 47 percent (3.456 million vs. 2.353 million), up from the year-ago 32 percent, and led by 50 percent in 18-49 viewers (1.038 million vs. 690,000), up from last year’s 29 percent. At 12:35 a.m. ET, Jimmy Fallon stretched his third-quarter lead over “Late Late Show” to 44 percent in total viewers (1.658 million vs. 1.152 million), up from last year’s 24 percent, and increased his margin in viewers 18-49 to 54 percent (653,000 vs. 423,000), up from the year-ago 33 percent.

"Tonight" finishes the broadcast year having delivered a bigger 18-49 audience than "Late Show" for 34 of their last 38 head-to-head weeks (excludes weeks of Olympic preemptions) and their last 16 weeks in a row, while Jimmy Fallon has attracted a bigger 18-49 audience than "Late Late Show" for each of their last 41 head-to-head weeks.

“Tonight” concluded the broadcast year and the third quarter with #1 finishes for the week of September 17-21, delivering bigger audiences than “Late Show” in every key ratings category, despite a high-rated Tuesday edition of “Late Show” featuring a guest appearance by President Barack Obama. Note that Friday’s “Late Show” was an encore. At 12:35 a.m. ET, Jimmy Fallon also topped “Late Late Show” in all key ratings categories for the week.

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of September 17-21. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.7 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3*

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.8/3

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2*

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.4/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.3/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2 (in encore telecasts)

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.1 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 2.9 million viewers*

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

ABC “Nightline,” 3.5 million viewers

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.7 million viewers*

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.5 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.2 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers (in encore telecasts)

 

* Friday’s “Late Show” and “Kimmel” were encores


THIRD QUARTER

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.5/2

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.7/3

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.3/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.5 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 2.4 million viewers

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

ABC “Nightline,” 3.3 million viewers

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.6 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.2 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

 


SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.9/3

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

ABC “Nightline,” 3.7 million viewers

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.7 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

 


SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF SEPTEMBER 17-21

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.8

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.8 million

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.4 million

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.9 million

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

###

 

 

 

 
  • Brad

    I’m loving the spew of hate directed at Conan there. It finally makes sense though why Conan’s show keeps popping up on The Huffington Post like its a Presidential Race. Even though I agree with the author how Conan seemed to be dissatisfied with his show when talking to Letterman, never really mentioning it, just saying how rewarding it is to be “working for Turner”, Conan is working for Turner in many ways. Conanco is producing a few shows now, one being Eagleheart which is on Adult Swim, not TBS.

    I do agree with the author that the show has very little reason to its exsistence beyond sketch comedies, but I haven’t seen that many on his show. Last one I remember was his 4th of July barbeque with Andy. This however doesn’t mean I don’t like his show or don’t watch his show.

  • Aaron

    Brad, speaking of sketch comedies, I think Conan mentioned once recently that he could bring Conando back; sounds like there are some legal issues regarding that sketch.

  • Gary Middleton

    Brad, I feel like it wouldn’t take the biggest adjustment to make that show work again in that existential sense. For example, some here have suggested that if he doesn’t like doing a monologue, stop doing it. Fair point.

    I say go ‘Leno’ on it and do the jokes sincerely and un-ironically. Occasionally he does that and it works because he’s very good at it. I’m sure to him it would feel like a massive change, but what are we really talking about? Doing the same jokes he does now, with the same delivery he does now, but stopping before he gets to post-joke hoopla. There is no need to do everything with an above-the-format wink or smirk or tic after 20 years. In fact, it doesn’t make sense.

    The problem is he doesn’t want to drop the monologue *and* he doesn’t want to do an earnest one. He wants to do an insincere monologue.

  • Diana Santiago

    Can you explain what do you mean by “insincere monologue”? I must be dumb.

  • kscottk11

    “Diana,

    It would be interesting to compare the amount of time the author used to spew venom against Conan with the amount of time you’ve dedicated to spewing venom against Jay Leno.

    I think you’d win, girlfriend.”

    Thank you, Monikka.

  • Diana Santiago

    I’m a winner!!!! Thank you all for the recognition!! :D

  • Diana Santiago

    Does that mean that I can claim that I’m the Queen of Late Night threads? ;)
    I’m the UNDISPUTED # 1!!!!

  • Brad

    I still respect your comments Diana. I like how we can go to you for Conan news and facts.

    When people were telling Conan to have stayed at NBC, I wonder how much they knew that Conan would not be getting a lot of his bits back if he went elsewhere? Anyways, can anyone explain to me how he is able to get his sketches back after a certain period of time? Like why can he all of a sudden bring Conando back?

  • Brad

    I’m with you Gary. Conan needs to learn how to do the monologue to his liking, not as some sort of chore in order to get the free-form/improv style of comedy he loves so much. I think he should do it like Fallon, throw ten of the best jokes out there and then start have fun with your other bits.

    Something tells me though that it makes economic sense to have a monologue than to have multiple sketches. Something also tells me that they keep the monologue like it is because it is good practice if everyone + Conan goes back to broadcast (which looks like a slimmer chance as each day passes).

  • Brad

    Ken Tucker nailed it all right on the head about Fallon, Kimmel, Leno, Letterman and Ferguson. Only complaint is that when Letterman really has a deep conversation with someone, it is really quite something.

    One thing about the whole Fallon fawning thing he does with his guests, it is pretty much the same as Leno except Fallon seems like he actually watches their shows while Leno is obviously reading cue cards with no sense of what the project is. If Fallon is suppose replace Leno and everyone is concern that he isn’t a good interview, WELL TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT LENO!!!

  • Diana Santiago

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-4443560267878598550 If you don’t want to watch the whole thing, jump to minute 23:00.

    Why Conan is getting some sketches back? I have no idea. Maybe a a combination of a game of dare and a little indifference of a new NBC management with bigger problems in their hands.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Can you explain what do you mean by “insincere monologue”? I must be dumb.”

    A monologue where he isn’t fully committed to the jokes he’s doing, or even to the concept of doing monologue jokes.

  • Gary Middleton

    “If Fallon is suppose replace Leno and everyone is concern that he isn’t a good interview, WELL TAKE A GOOD LOOK AT LENO!!!”

    Also, you might enjoy knowing that in Dave’s early years the big knock on him was that he was a bad interviewer. And when Johnny started the big knock on him was that he was a bad interviewer.

    Doesn’t really matter.

  • Diana Santiago

    “A monologue where he isn’t fully committed to the jokes he’s doing, or even to the concept of doing monologue jokes.”

    Why do you say he’s not fully committed? Because he has the ability to understand a joke can bomb and make fun about that? At least he has never said “Oh, my microphone must be off, (that’s why you’re not laughing)”.

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