Late Night TV Ratings For October 8-12, 2012

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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October 18th, 2012

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

 

Via NBC's Press Release

'Tonight Show' AND 'LATE NIGHT' GENERATE #1 FINISHES FOR THE WEEK OF OCT. 8-12

 

 

JAY LENO TOPS THE ABC AND CBS TIME-SLOT COMPETITION IN ALL KEY CATEGORIES: ADULTS, MEN AND WOMEN 18-34, 18-49 AND 25-54, PLUS TOTAL VIEWERS

 

THROUGH THE SEASON'S FIRST THREE WEEKS, JAY HAS INCREASED HIS YEAR-AGO MARGINS OVER 'Late Show' IN 18-34, 18-49, 25-54 AND TOTAL VIEWERS

 

JAY AND JIMMY DELIVER FIVE-WEEK HIGHS IN 18-49 AND TOTAL VIEWERS

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – October 18, 2012 – NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” has delivered #1 results for the late-night week of October 8-12, generating bigger audiences in every key category than the time-period competition of CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" and ABC's combination in that hour of "Nightline" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live." Jay led that competition across the board, with bigger audiences in adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

 

Through the first three weeks of the 2012-13 season, "Tonight" has stretched its leads versus one year-ago over "Late Show" in viewers 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, as well as total viewers.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET last week, "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" topped CBS's encore telecasts of "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson" and ABC's "Kimmel" in their head-to-head half-hour in 18-49 viewers, total viewers and other key categories. Note that Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Both "Tonight" and "Late Night" scored five-week highs in viewers 18-49 and total viewers, generating their biggest audiences in those categories since the week of September 3-7.

 

Through the first three weeks of the season, "Tonight" has stretched its viewers 18-49 margin over "Late Show" to 6 percent (951,000 vs. 894,000), eliminating last year's "Late Show" advantage of 4 percent, while Jay lengthened his total-viewer advantage to 12 percent (3.316 million vs. 2.960 million) from last year's 10 percent, increased his 25-54 advantage to 4 percent (1.220 million vs. 1.170 million) after trailing by 1 percent last year and stretched his 18-34 lead to 16 percent (323,000 vs. 279,000) from last year’s 8 percent.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of October 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.7/3

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2*

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2 (in encore telecasts)

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 2.9 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 3.6 million viewers

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.7 million viewers*

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers (in encore telecasts)

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.8 million viewers*

 

* Friday’s “Kimmel” and “Last Call” were encores

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.8/3

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.3 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 3.7 million viewers

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.8 million viewers

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF OCTOBER 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.8

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” delayed by baseball

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.8 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.3 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” delayed by baseball

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 
  • Diana Santiago
  • Gary Middleton

    “Diana, Leno does not want to produce or be into the business part of other shows.”

    Very skillful way of saying that Diana’s “yeah, but Jay Leno…” response to every shot anyone takes at Conan is generally incoherent.

    I mean, all she really had to say was that TV production is a tricky, low % endeavor where a few hits pay for the many misses. If this new show really catches at ABC, it will easily cover all the failures and that’s how the game goes for all but a handful of Chuck Lorres and David E. Kelleys.

  • Gary Middleton

    Thanks for the note, GAR. Explains why Jay had the gaping hole in the schedule so close to airtime.

    So in classic Leno fashion, Jay has Obama on Wednesday when sweeps begins Thursday. Reads like a line from that Alanis hit “Ironic”.

  • Gary Middleton

    Thanks, Brad, good luck! Last polls I looked at seemed pretty good. If there wasn’t a formal Libertarian in the mix, would probably be a slam dunk.

  • Aaron

    Brad, Andy Barker P.I. was actually received pretty well by critics.

  • Brad

    Not to keep beating up Conan, but Fallon’s toss up has done a lot better than Andy Barker, P.I. which only got 6 episodes aired before cancelled. An etter failure. Guys with Kids will have 8 episodes shown by Nov. 7th. and if it is renewed, Fallon will totally surpass Conan in producing while being younger at that.

    I really don’t want to keep talking about this. Producing and starting up shows takes a lot out of a person. It is, like Gary said, hits or misses, and there are only a handful of great producers with loads of success. There is a good reason why Leno, Ferguson, Colbert, and many others do not produce shows. It’s not that they are stupid, it’s not that they can’t afford it, it’s because it takes a lot of time and energy. However, if you can produce a hit show, possibly even more than one, AND be the host if a hit show, well then, you’ve got to one of the netwotk’s hugest asset which is exactly what Letterman was back in the late 90’s and early 00’s with Everybody Loves Raymond being one of the Top Ten shows in the country.

  • Brad

    Yes Aaron, it got some critic praise, but it wasn’t that kind of broad show you’d want the family to sit down and watch. It was that BROAD kind of comedy for BROADcast. That’s a big thing I still never got about Conan. 10 years into late night it hit him he can’t be this silly, wacky, red-headed clown everyone has come to know and live. You can’t go on into your 60’s doing that. That’s why he wanted The Tonight Show. He wanted to be on the air as long as possible like Carson and like Letterman. As soon as he gets onto The Tonight Show, he was doing the same antics as before and the NBC executives FREAKED OUT!

    Maybe Conan was planning to slowly turn into a broad comedy for longevity sakes, but to also to not lose much of its current audience. Just like Letterman did at CBS. I don’t know. But Conan still hasn’t made the transition and I don’t know how much longer he can go on like he is. I just don’t know.

  • anonymous

    Fifty years from now, very few people will be interested in the Conan vs. Leno debacle like very few people today are interested in television from the 60’s. So when someone does research the event in the future, Bill Gorman’s book will remain as the historical record. Today, when people take sides, everything is black and white. But the truth is a lot more nuanced than people suspect.

    One common perception out there is that Jeff Zucker was in on a conspiracy at NBC to sabatoge Conan. Did Conan believe this to be true? Yes. But that doesn’t mean it’s true. I actually found Zucker to be a sympathetic character in the book. Had Zucker’s agenda really been to sabatoge Conan, then there were two instances where he could have done just that, but he didn’t. Zucker sided with Conan when he gave The Tonight Show to Conan over the wishes of Leno. Leno only found out about it after the deal with Conan was done. As the date of the transition neared, if Zucker had been anti-Conan, he would have acted then:

    “Zucker wasn’t surprised the first time whispers circulating around the corners of NBC’s Rock Center executive suite reached him — with no names attached. Would NBC consider, for even half a second, the outrageous? Pay off Conan, wish him well, and keep Jay? That was not the last trick in Zucker’s bag; and for many reasons — at least 45 million of them — he didn’t waste time responding to the rumors.”

    Zucker could have paid off Conan then for $45 million, but instead sided with Conan and spent over $50 million alone on the new Tonight Show studio. If Zucker had been in a conspiracy, it was a very expensive and convoluted one.

    The second occasion where Zucker could have “shafted” Conan, but didn’t, was when the Conan/NBC divorce seemed certain:

    [Zucker replied, not quite saying the name Gavin Polone. "I want an answer quickly. You know I have the ability to pay him or play him, and I could ice him for two years."]

    When Conan refused Zuckers plans, Zucker didn’t hit Conan with the hammer by paying Conan off and keeping him off the air for two years, he kept it at nine months.

  • anonymous

    Jeff Zucker was never anti anybody. He just believed in the strategy of keeping both Conan and Leno in the NBC “family”, and with good reason.

    “If — really, when — Jay refused all NBC’s various offers, he would take up residence at ABC, and money would surely follow him. Zucker had already received estimates from the network’s research and sales departments of what a Jay-at-ABC outcome would mean: NBC would take a monetary pasting.”

    As for Leno’s part, critics see fault in him not going to ABC. The book explains it this way:

    [Jay Leno recoiled from what he saw as the potential consequences of a change of professional address. As usual, he had a ready line for it: “The czar you have is always better than the czar you’re going to get.” A new place meant new camera operators, new pages, new everything. Worse, he foresaw an ugly scenario taking shape, with his long relationships at NBC turning hostile the moment he announced he was moving on. “Then the mysterious sandbag falls on your head,” he said. “I’m Italian. I know how this works.” Jay elaborated: “Suddenly little stories appear in the papers: ‘The arrogant Mr. Leno refused to…’ Or ‘Jay took a private jet to go to…’ And you’re like, where did this come from?” Staff members who might have felt slighted by some little incident that had taken place fifteen years earlier would suddenly be out peddling nasty stories. “You get fragged. Your own troops are shooting at you — that’s the worst thing.”

    So when Zucker made a contract offer no sane tv person could refuse, Leno accepted it. The 10pm solution.

  • anonymous

    This is how Zucker saw his 10pm problem:

    “In 2004-2005, CBS’s ten p.m. shows had averaged a network-best 4.17 rating in the age group eighteen to forty-nine. The same year NBC’s ten p.m. shows had averaged a 3.9 rating and ABC’s a 2.82. Every year since, the numbers had dropped precipitously, to the point where Wurtzel’s department was projecting the ten p.m. shows in 2008-2009 to fall below a 2.0 rating for both NBC and ABC, with CBS at just 2.43. Those were massive falloffs of approaching 50 percent for each network. And this shrinkage was affecting shows generally among the most expensive in television, cop and medical dramas, with high-cost actors and writers and demanding production values. It only figured to get worse. The widespread and increasing use of DVRs was wreaking havoc on network schedules, and nowhere more so than at ten p.m. Viewers had clearly developed the habit of playing back favored shows from earlier in the evening, or earlier in the week, at that hour instead of watching the offerings on the three networks.”

    Leno at 10 pm was Zucker’s plan.

    [As one of Zucker's close associates put it privately, "I do think Jeff made a master stroke here. He's positioned it so that if Leno goes down, no one will want him anymore. ABC will have moved on. Conan, meanwhile has a chance to take root." Even if that didn't happen, if Conan flopped, then it would be Conan trying to reenter the late-night market as a diminished thing. And if Jay actually did succeed at ten? "Jeff solves the ten p.m. problem," the Zucker associate said, "and all his costs go down."]

  • anonymous

    Zucker had no intension of sabatoging Conan. Were he allowed to go through with his plan, Conan would stay at 11:35 and Leno would stay at 10 for the two years guaranteed in his contract.

    What Zucker did not account for was that the NBC affilliates would revolt and demand that Jay Leno at 10pm be cancelled and that they wanted Leno at 11:35pm.

    “If something wasn’t done in January, the stations themselves would seek their own remedies. They would begin preempting Jay — either by moving their newscasts up to ten and pushing Jay back into late night or by acquiring some syndicated hour to stick in at ten — and they would go public with their plans.”

    “Fiorile possessed evidence that the affiliate body did not disagree. NBC had asked him what the local stations’ preference would be at 11:35. Fiorile had quietly polled the affiliate board. The stations had long experience with Jay. (And the age group most of them occupied did not fall anywhere near the core audience of eighteen-to-thirty-four-year-olds that idolized Conan.) So it was little surprise whom the station owners preferred. Not one voted for Conan.”

    I think history will say that the reasons why Conan is not the host of The Tonight Show today are:
    1. Conan did not have “fully stipulated time-period protection”.
    2. A revolt by the affiliates that destroyed Zucker’s plan.
    3. Zucker’s insistence on keeping both hosts “in the family”.
    4. Leno’s desire to stay at NBC.

    It would be interesting to ask Zucker, given what he knows today, what he would have done differently? I lean towards the idea that Zucker would have let Leno go to ABC.

  • Gary Middleton

    Very interesting analysis from one of my favorite minds on the internet.

    FWIW, Anonymous, I don’t believe there was really an offer from ABC. Nothing about it rang true to me. A guy who thinks he was put on this earth to “tell jokes at 11:30 at night” would not turn down an offer to tell jokes at 11:30 at night.

    The book made it clear that ABC’s boss was relieved when Jay turned them down, which is a good hint they weren’t really trying to land Leno. They made a play for Dave earlier in the decade, which helped force CBS to pay more and maybe taught ABC about the strategic role they could play in a situation like that. Ultimately, this time, they not only gave Jay the leverage to squeeze over a hundred million dollars from NBC, they also helped NBC forfeit prime time.

    btw, we know Fox helped Conan/hurt Turner in this way.

  • anonymous

    “I don’t believe there was really an offer from ABC.”

    You may be right, but that wasn’t how I interpreted the book. Would Leno have gotten that unprecedented contract if all of his offers were illusions?

    Here are some passages and see what you think.

    [Sony laid a goody-laden package under Jay's nose: the biggest payday in late night, more than $40 million a year; ownership of his own show and a companion twelve thirty show (the match of Letterman's deal with CBS); and a landmark new studio on Sony's Culver City lot. "When he walks on the lot, there'll be a Yellow Brick Road to the Jay Leno Theater," said one Sony executive, adding that it would become "the centerpiece of the Sony lot." Sony was even dangling connections to Sony' music division --- if Jay broke new artists on the show he might get in on a percentage of their sales. The company promised to think of ways to associate Jay with its PlayStation franchise, maybe promotions in the products, something to help Jay reach the young men obsessed with video games. Even with all the perks, Sony's executives knew their proposal was a long shot, simply because it didn't come with a network attached. To make syndication work Sony would have to canvass the country to line up stations.]

    [Jay first called Peter Chernin at FOX, thanking him for his generous interest but letting him know he was staying at NBC, because the network was handing him the ten p.m. weeknight slot.]

    [Then Jay called Bob Iger at Disney. Clearly the matter had gone farther with Disney and ABC, and Jay had spent a lot of time laying the ground-work with Jimmy Kimmel for a possible tag-team effort. So with Iger he was more expansive, describing how deeply he had appreciated the interest, how impressed he was with ABC's proposal, and how close he came to accepting.]

    [Iger took the news equalbly; in truth, he wasn't all that disappointed. Switching networks was always a crapshoot. Maybe Jay wouldn't have provided a surefire windfall, and at least he didn't have to face an immediate confrontation with the ABC news division over Nightline.]

  • anonymous

    Another way to look at it is if it was all just for show and there was no deal, then Iger wouldn’t have had to worry about confronting the news division.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Would Leno have gotten that unprecedented contract if all of his offers were illusions?”

    Yes, that’s what a great bluff does. That’s what Conan and Fox managed to do to seal that phenomenal deal from TBS.

    The book absolutely, unequivocally depicts an ABC 11:30 offer to Leno. Because its sources, the parties involved, are presumably telling that story. But it doesn’t ring true to me. If the book was a script, the writer would get a diminished grade in screenwriting class because one of the people is acting totally out of character with no strong motive. And for whatever it’s worth to anyone I have had Tonight people (who like me probably can’t know for sure) agree “there was no ABC offer”.

  • anonymous

    I would buy that if it was a newspaper or magazine breaking news or a current story. Then it is highly believable that those are just vehicles to transport a deception to influence an event.

    In the case of the book, all the events had already transpired. It was published in 2010 when there was nothing left to manipulate. I don’t see why anyone would lie to Bill Gorman at that point. He’s just out to gather the facts and get to the truth at the bottom.

  • Brad

    “I think history will say that the reasons why Conan is not the host of The Tonight Show today are:
    1. Conan did not have “fully stipulated time-period protection”.
    2. A revolt by the affiliates that destroyed Zucker’s plan.
    3. Zucker’s insistence on keeping both hosts “in the family”.
    4. Leno’s desire to stay at NBC.”

    That summarizes it all right there. Btw, you do mean Bill Carter, not Bill Gorman… right?

  • Brad

    As Conan has learned, it is much more difficult to switch networks than it seems. It is like transferring schools, not everything makes it through the transfer. I’m with you Gary to some extent that the ABC deal was just talk. It had some backing to it like Leno calling up Kimmel about teaming up for 2 hours of late night, but that could have been ABC tugging at Leno’s chin to show that they are “interested” in him. Even today Kimmel keeps on saying ABC was just yanking Leno’s chain to make NBC double down on Leno. Did ABC wanted O’Brien out of this whole thing which is why they wanted to Leno to get tied down?

    Also, no one is answering my longevity question of Conan. How come he didn’t significantly broaden is comedy on The Tonight Show? How come he still hasn’t broaden is comedy TBS?. How much longer can he continue being the silly, wacky, red-head we all know and love?

  • Douglas in TN

    If anything, the 2009/2010 deal shows, as Jimmy Fallon himself said, that having a show at 12:30 in no way guarantees moving up to 11:30. That’s only one reason I’ve doubted any talk of Fallon moving up, although I agree with Mr. Middleton that he may be all NBC has in the bullpen.

    I would imagine that NBC and CBS will focus group the hell out of this upcoming transition period, if they haven’t started yet. I’d be fascinated to see if the networks allow guest hosts to serve as on air auditions.

    As for Conan not making a transition, there were many, like myself, who hoped that he wouldn’t. He might have resisted knowing the critical drubbing Leno has taken for abandoning his act for an 11:30 audience, not wanting to go down the same route. Ironically, though, when Conan went to TBS, he did just that…he created a show that would equal Leno’s with the broadness and blandness. Only two years later is Conan becoming Conan again.

    Brad, Gary, I enjoy reading your commentaries.

  • Aaron

    Douglas, I agree. Conan’s summer shows two years ago were some of the worst shows that I have ever seen him do. It was like he had no desire to be making a show. Now it looks like he is having fun.

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