Late Night TV Ratings For October 8-12, 2012

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

Written By

October 18th, 2012

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

 

Via NBC's Press Release

'Tonight Show' AND 'LATE NIGHT' GENERATE #1 FINISHES FOR THE WEEK OF OCT. 8-12

 

 

JAY LENO TOPS THE ABC AND CBS TIME-SLOT COMPETITION IN ALL KEY CATEGORIES: ADULTS, MEN AND WOMEN 18-34, 18-49 AND 25-54, PLUS TOTAL VIEWERS

 

THROUGH THE SEASON'S FIRST THREE WEEKS, JAY HAS INCREASED HIS YEAR-AGO MARGINS OVER 'Late Show' IN 18-34, 18-49, 25-54 AND TOTAL VIEWERS

 

JAY AND JIMMY DELIVER FIVE-WEEK HIGHS IN 18-49 AND TOTAL VIEWERS

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – October 18, 2012 – NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” has delivered #1 results for the late-night week of October 8-12, generating bigger audiences in every key category than the time-period competition of CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" and ABC's combination in that hour of "Nightline" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live." Jay led that competition across the board, with bigger audiences in adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

 

Through the first three weeks of the 2012-13 season, "Tonight" has stretched its leads versus one year-ago over "Late Show" in viewers 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, as well as total viewers.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET last week, "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" topped CBS's encore telecasts of "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson" and ABC's "Kimmel" in their head-to-head half-hour in 18-49 viewers, total viewers and other key categories. Note that Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Both "Tonight" and "Late Night" scored five-week highs in viewers 18-49 and total viewers, generating their biggest audiences in those categories since the week of September 3-7.

 

Through the first three weeks of the season, "Tonight" has stretched its viewers 18-49 margin over "Late Show" to 6 percent (951,000 vs. 894,000), eliminating last year's "Late Show" advantage of 4 percent, while Jay lengthened his total-viewer advantage to 12 percent (3.316 million vs. 2.960 million) from last year's 10 percent, increased his 25-54 advantage to 4 percent (1.220 million vs. 1.170 million) after trailing by 1 percent last year and stretched his 18-34 lead to 16 percent (323,000 vs. 279,000) from last year’s 8 percent.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of October 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.7/3

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2*

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2 (in encore telecasts)

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 2.9 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 3.6 million viewers

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.7 million viewers*

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers (in encore telecasts)

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.8 million viewers*

 

* Friday’s “Kimmel” and “Last Call” were encores

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.8/3

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.3 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 3.7 million viewers

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.8 million viewers

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF OCTOBER 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.8

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” delayed by baseball

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.8 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.3 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” delayed by baseball

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 
  • GARebelman

    Pretty good NBC late night preliminaries last night. No overruns that I know of as everything started on time.

  • Brad

    I was waiting for someone else’s input before saying this, so now I can say I think is trying to tone it down a bit on purpose. Remember how I pointed out that Conan hasnt done nearly half of the things he did on The Tonight Show? On his TBS show he isn’t the one doing all the remotes or even that many. He has been leaving himself out of a good chunk of the things that make up the show, being more like a host rather than a star. I feel like he sits at his desk more than he had ever did. Yes, yes. He takes his show on the road and that’s all good fun, honestly it is, but two weeks a year doesnt represent all the other weeks.

    As for the god-awful summer shows a year ago, I don’t think they were bad simply because Conan was trying to be broad. It seemed like they lacked content across the board. For the most part there was no remotes, no characters, no skits, poorly written jokes and poorly executed at that. Some wise guy would says “well thats what Leno does”. Wrong. Leno has simple jokes coming out of his mouth every few seconds and executives (most of) them perfectly. He also gets the laugh track in to boost the comedy effect back at home, and WALA! A hit show! Conan telling a joke, making fun at how it bombed, doing a weird dance, wait too long, move on to the next one, with nothing to break up the terrible pauses/jokes, yeah, welcome to the summer of 2011.

  • jcfreder

    I don’t know what really happened, but if I were ABC, I would have offered Leno the slot, so it makes sense to me that there was actually an offer. NBC was somewhat bizarrly casting aside the longtime ratings leader, so why not go after it. It’s not as if ABC was acting high and mighty by protecting Nightline — they made an offer to Letterman and ultimately decided to move Jimmy Kimmel to that spot. I mean, if you are willing to go with Kimmel, who has never shown particularly good ratings numbers, why wouldn’t they have tried for the sure thing that Leno represented.

    Now, as for why Leno did not go with ABC, I tend to see staying with NBC as a risk-adverse move (I think more scary “change” would have been involved in changing networks), and quite frankly, I think he knew his iron-clad contract meant that he’d always have a shot at getting the Tonight Show back.

    Remember, back during the original Late Night War, NBC apparently offered Letterman the Tonight Show with the caviat that he’d have to wait 18 months. Meaning that Leno would have 18 months to turn things around. NBC’s motive has always been to try to have it both ways, keeping both options as long as possible. In some ways Late Night War II ended up pretty good for them because the nightmare scenario, having Conan or Leno jump to ABC or Fox and succeed as Letterman did as CBS, never materialized. Obviously the TS was damaged in the process, but Conan was damaged much worse.

  • Brad

    I just thinking buying up a veteran in 60′s isn’t a worthy investment. I don’t know the exact stats but signing someone like Raul Ibanez an 5-year contract because he has similar stats to Josh Hamilton would NOT be a good move. Age has a huge factor to these things. Ibanez can still do great things, but with him being 40, his best years are behind him.

    No matter the amount, Kimmel continues to grow in the ratings while everyone else sinks. I don’t think Kimmel has reached his plateau. I think he can do some great things still. His show was never much of anything until recently, specifically when LN War II came. If he continues what he’s doing, I think ABC made the right choice in sticking with Kimmel, whether it was their initial plan or not.

  • jcfreder

    I think people vastly overestimate Kimmel’s ability to “break out” once he goes to 1130. His numbers now might be improving, but they are pretty dismal to start with. I’m almost certain that the first half hour of his show loses to the back end of Letterman and Leno, and there’s no question that his second half hour gets beaten by the front end of Fallon and Ferguson.

    I guess the hope is that you get him started while Leno and Letterman are there and get a head start on the inevitable Fallon and Ferguson promotions. But its still a pretty big gamble because I think there’s a strong chance that the viewers simply don’t show up, ala Conan, who I think had quite a bit more momentum (and talent) heading into the shift. The changing of the guard will create a natural jumping off point for a lot of people. At that point the late night kings are Adult Swim and John Stewart (if they aren’t already.)

  • Gary Middleton

    “In the case of the book, all the events had already transpired. It was published in 2010 when there was nothing left to manipulate. I don’t see why anyone would lie to Bill Carter at that point.”

    Jay would have a motive to say an ABC offer existed because it looks way better to be the guy who had a lot of offers. Plus you don’t want to say “the whole thing was a ruse” because it affects any future dealings.

    ABC and Iger would have a motive to stick to the story because they may use this maneuver all the time and don’t want antennae raised when they do it.

    Douglas, thanks and likewise. jc, very excellent call on the debate’s impact on NBC Monday night vs. Revolution’s usual impact.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I just thinking buying up a veteran in 60?s isn’t a worthy investment.”

    I think that’s right. jc, the one edge we have to give Kimmel at 11:35 is his age. If we accept the house rules that 18-49 is all that matters, I can’t see how he doesn’t grow his audience pretty steeply relative to Jay and Dave (even if that just means losing fewer viewers) over the course of their shared tenure.

    One other thing Kimmel should gain with the move is booking clout. Rather than get Jay’s guests from earlier in the week, he’ll start to get a lot of them first.

  • Gary Middleton

    .37 for Conan last week as he got lost in a tough shuffle with baseball, debates, Stewart/Colbert blockbuster numbers, etc.

    Interesting week ahead. Trump is promising to drop a bombshell on the President tomorrow, and the Leno show could be his first chance to respond. And then Dave kicks off sweeps with Trump on Thursday. And Kimmel has Michelle O the same night. Brutal out there.

  • Mario

    Dave is a big fan of the President so I wonder if he’ll rip into Trump! I’m waiting for someone to rip that fat bag of hot air!

    JC, ABC never offered Leno a contract because NBC never released him. I saw an interview with an ABC exec in 2009 when he said if Leno was available they could’ve worked something out.

  • jcfreder

    Gary, I hear you about the age factor. I think its possible that Kimmel’s numbers remain more “relatively” stable, but he is still working with a lower ceiling.

    I can see things playing out somewhat similar to Tonight Show Conan – Kimmel may compete in the demo but get slaughtered in the overall viewers, with some of those viewers going to Dave or Jay (Dave saw big increases in total viewers during Conan’s run). I know we always talk about the overall viewership doesn’t matter much, but if he’s down in the demo from Nightline (which I think is a probability) and way down in the overall (which I think is a distinct possibility) it’s going to be hard to spin the change as a success. Keep in mind Kimmel is 44 – do we really think he’s pulling in a ton of viewers on the 18-25 end of the demo?

    Of course, ABC can always dig in and wait for old guard to retire, but then the question is whether Kimmel can beat Fallon or Ferguson straight up. I don’t see anything in the numbers suggesting that that’s a good bet. Granted this is pretty much just hunch and conjecture on my part.

    Mario – good point, although I think it’s a bit technical — I’m sure ABC let it be known to Jay whether they were serious or not. My guess is they were

  • Brad

    All the networks kept doing studies on how well Leno or Conan would do on their network, yet no one reviles just how significant who would be where? NBC kept saying Conan at FOX would but a significant dent into Leno’s ratings. Really? By how much? Would it have been a 1.2 to a 0.9 in the ratings like it was as soon as Leno retook the throne? If so, then the move for Conan to move to FOX to be devastating was overhyped.

  • Brad

    KIMMEL

    I think Kimmel will be a good investment for AT LEAST the next 5 years or so. The youth will rather watch Kimmel over Letterman or Leno. I promise you that. Kimmel has more popular videos on YouTube than Conan or Letterman. Remember that collection of parents pranking their kids for Halloween? That was VIRAL! If given the choice, the younger half of the late night audience will watch Kimmel over Leno or Letterman. The older half will most likely stick with those they know. Nightline viewers will either flee to Leno or Letterman because they sure as hell don’t watch Kimmel currently (or maybe they simply don’t watch late night comedy).

    As for the future of Kimmel, beyond 2013, I think he will be in a good place in terms of guest bookings. He will be a host all the stars know and love as Leno and Letterman will be gone. I doubt everyone in Hollywood really knows Ferguson or been on his show. I also feel that Fallon will have a difficult time starting out if he has to make a move out to LA. Either show in LA would have a difficult time going up against the familiar face which is Kimmel. Remember, people like people who they are familiar with, and that means big-named stars and the television audience. Kimmel will win up against Fallon and Ferguson, but only at first.

    I doubt Kimmel has enough juice to really compete with the fun and lovable Fallon. This is where Kimmel will start to decline and Fallon rises. Ferguson (if successor to Letterman) will always be third, but because he will strictly be a broadcaster with a small budget, CBS will be very pleased as long as he stays close in the ratings to the other. You know, how it currently is at 12:30.

    That’s my opinion
    (and thanks Douglass for you comment. Much appreciated! You are noble contributor as well.)

  • Gary Middleton

    “Keep in mind Kimmel is 44 – do we really think he’s pulling in a ton of viewers on the 18-25 end of the demo?”

    We don’t, but I figure that isn’t where the audience is likely to be for this kind of show anyway. The battle is in the upper end of the 18-49 demo, where they presumably are more sedentary and watch more TV, more passively. Conan has always been competitive in 18-25, yet not competitive overall- somewhere along the way he lost 34-49.

    Conceivable to me that Kimmel can bring new 34-49s to the conventional talk show realm.

  • Gary Middleton

    Let’s remember that to some extent Kimmel has had to battle with a hand tied behind his back. Nightline, even the more showbiz version, was never a compatible lead-in. His show started later and therefore couldn’t get guests until the 11:30 shows got them first. And his show started while the 11:30 shows were already on and cutting across the top of the hour. These issues go away in January.

  • anonymous

    @Brad
    Yes, I meant Bill Carter, brain cramp there.

    @Gary
    Yes, it is in the realm of possibility that over a year after the fact Leno would lie in an interview to Carter and say that he was very close to taking ABC’s offer and it is possible that Iger lied when he expressed relief at not having to confront the news division and Carter portrayed it in the book as fact.

    No details were given in the book of the ABC deal for Leno, maybe to protect against what Kimmel might want to demand in the future.

  • Natrix

    Leno viewers are the same type that watched Opera. Just like things pleasant and light. It was amazing how Leno was lying through his teeth, yet the audience felt all this compassion for him since he was going with that ‘It wasn’t my fault’ routine.

    As for his viewers drop-off, those are the people that were very much turned off by him and his shenanigans.

  • Natrix

    Leno viewers are the same type that watched Oprah. Just like things pleasant and light. It was amazing how Leno was lying through his teeth, yet the audience felt all this compassion for him since he was going with that ‘It wasn’t my fault’ routine.

    As for his viewers drop-off, those are the people that were very much turned off by him and his shenanigans.

  • Mario

    Brad, I totally agree NBC overreacted to the “threat” Conan posed by going elsewhere. Conan on Fox would’ve been a disaster without the Leno lead in and Conan would’ve been cancelled soon enough anyway. Fox was the ONLY network interested and even they lost interest!

    JC, ABC was serious about hiring Leno but he was never a free agent.

  • jcfreder

    I fully understand why NBC tried to move heaven and earth to keep Leno and Conan for the longest possible time. They remembered the fallout from the Letterman/Leno war and wanted to stave off the worst-case scenario: Conan moves to ABC or Fox and killing. In 2004, when NBC announced the succession plan for Conan, he had a lot more momentum than people may remember now, after the Tonight Show fiasco. Losing the younger, “hipper” host and then having no one to replace Jay when he retired was a risky proposition.

    This has always been NBC’s MO. They cut a deal to give Jay the Tonight Show to avoid Jay going to CBS — Dave was still under contract so his situation was less urgent. Even when NBC offered Dave the Tonight Show there was an 18-month waiting period, to keep both guys in the fold as long as they could.

    Basically, plan A has always been to keep the talent in house and worry about what happens later.

  • Mario

    JC, Conan’s horrible ratings at TBS and Fox completely losing interest in him show that NBC had nothing to worry about by letting him go!

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