Late Night TV Ratings For October 8-12, 2012

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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October 18th, 2012

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

 

Via NBC's Press Release

'Tonight Show' AND 'LATE NIGHT' GENERATE #1 FINISHES FOR THE WEEK OF OCT. 8-12

 

 

JAY LENO TOPS THE ABC AND CBS TIME-SLOT COMPETITION IN ALL KEY CATEGORIES: ADULTS, MEN AND WOMEN 18-34, 18-49 AND 25-54, PLUS TOTAL VIEWERS

 

THROUGH THE SEASON'S FIRST THREE WEEKS, JAY HAS INCREASED HIS YEAR-AGO MARGINS OVER 'Late Show' IN 18-34, 18-49, 25-54 AND TOTAL VIEWERS

 

JAY AND JIMMY DELIVER FIVE-WEEK HIGHS IN 18-49 AND TOTAL VIEWERS

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. – October 18, 2012 – NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” has delivered #1 results for the late-night week of October 8-12, generating bigger audiences in every key category than the time-period competition of CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman" and ABC's combination in that hour of "Nightline" and "Jimmy Kimmel Live." Jay led that competition across the board, with bigger audiences in adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

 

Through the first three weeks of the 2012-13 season, "Tonight" has stretched its leads versus one year-ago over "Late Show" in viewers 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, as well as total viewers.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET last week, "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" topped CBS's encore telecasts of "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson" and ABC's "Kimmel" in their head-to-head half-hour in 18-49 viewers, total viewers and other key categories. Note that Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Both "Tonight" and "Late Night" scored five-week highs in viewers 18-49 and total viewers, generating their biggest audiences in those categories since the week of September 3-7.

 

Through the first three weeks of the season, "Tonight" has stretched its viewers 18-49 margin over "Late Show" to 6 percent (951,000 vs. 894,000), eliminating last year's "Late Show" advantage of 4 percent, while Jay lengthened his total-viewer advantage to 12 percent (3.316 million vs. 2.960 million) from last year's 10 percent, increased his 25-54 advantage to 4 percent (1.220 million vs. 1.170 million) after trailing by 1 percent last year and stretched his 18-34 lead to 16 percent (323,000 vs. 279,000) from last year’s 8 percent.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of October 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.7/3

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2*

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2 (in encore telecasts)

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 2.9 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 3.6 million viewers

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.7 million viewers*

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers (in encore telecasts)

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.8 million viewers*

 

* Friday’s “Kimmel” and “Last Call” were encores

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.8/3

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.5/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.3 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

 

11:35 p.m.-12 midnight ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 3.7 million viewers

 

12 midnight-1 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.8 million viewers

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF OCTOBER 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.8

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” delayed by baseball

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.8 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.3 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” delayed by baseball

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 
  • Brad

    “Basically, plan A has always been to keep the talent in house and worry about what happens later.”

    Sounds like NBC alright!

    “Losing the younger, “hipper” host and then having no one to replace Jay when he retired was a risky proposition.”

    This is why NBC was and is extremely fortunate Jimmy Fallon is turning out to be the future of late night. Imagine if it was someone like Letterman producing the Late Night Show and put in hosts that are no threat to him. Someone like Craig Kilborn. Wow! Again, NBC should be very thankful Fallon is doing well and doing well quicker than O’Brien did when he started out.

  • Brad

    “Brad, I totally agree NBC overreacted to the “threat” Conan posed by going elsewhere. Conan on Fox would’ve been a disaster without the Leno lead in and Conan would’ve been cancelled soon enough anyway. Fox was the ONLY network interested and even they lost interest!”

    Okay. Conan @ 11pm on a different network, not in direct competition with anyone. I think he would be in his own little world at FOX. Look at him at TBS. His ratings at the beginning didn’t really affect any host. Not that I remembered. There is a lot NBC didn’t calculate that they just though “Hey! New show amoungst x-amount of late night viewers? Ratings will go down across the board”. Didn’t really happen when Lopez Tonight or CONAN came into play. Didn’t really happen when Kimmel came into play. This theory beyond the first week of a new show is meanless in my eyes. The only time it made since is when the monopoly that was The Tonight Show in the early 90’s and Letterman went to CBS.

  • Gary Middleton

    Expecting some press release bravado from Comedy Central. They’ve hit 1.2 3 times this month, and when you only do about 15 shows a month that moves the needle. Figure they will find a way to declare an October victory in 18-49 over all late night talk shows.

  • anonymous

    @Mario
    The executives at FOX network very interested in getting Conan; but like at NBC, the FOX affiliates didn’t.

    “Peter Rice was undaunted by this prospect. By his calculation, Fox would have to buy the stations out of their expensive barter deals at a cost of something approximating $100 million. That didn’t include the start-up costs for a new late-night show, which could run to another $70 million. Rice and Reilly still wanted to do it. The word from the advertising executives was positive; they had already started to receive calls from big clients like Intel, Ford, and American Express. They all wanted in on a Conan late-night show on Fox, convinced it would be a demographic home run.”

    “Kevin Reilly took stock of the Conan situation. What he and Rice faced included a huge capital expenditure, stern resistance from a host of stations, and ratings prospects that likely would not have generated profits for a year or two, maybe longer. He and Rice heard from New York that Roger Ailes had stiffened his opposition and likely would not be moved. To force through a Conan deal now would surely create a raft of ill will inside the company — and, not incidentally, be a risky political maneuver internally.”

    “When Reilly made the call to inform the Conan forces of Fox’s decision to withdraw, they told him things had gotten close with another party. It would only hurt their leverage if Fox publicly passed now. Would Kevin mind sitting on this, just for about a week? Kevin said sure.”

    My opinion is that Conan would have been a hit at FOX. His stature there would have been on an equal footing as Leno’s or Letterman’s. People’s perception of Conan changed as soon as he landed at TBS; he was now a diminished figure. The talk show format works on broadcast but fails on cable — two totally different sets of expectations.

  • anonymous

    @Gary
    You may be right about Leno’s ABC deal, but I would rather subscribe to the saying “the simplest explanation is usually the right one.”

    In regards to their motives.

    Leno had years to plan for the time he would be released from The Tonight Show. Extremely plausible that he is out looking for a new job and exploring his options knowing that Zucker would likely back Conan and not go back on his promise to Conan. Leno was looking for a new job “for real” and not pretending to do so to use as leverage. He didn’t know what if anything NBC had in mind for him except to kick him out of his job.

    ABC saw the best salesman for the 11:35pm timeslot on the market and thinks, what a great opportunity to get him for our team! They would be out to get Leno “for real”, in order to bring that level of success to their network instead of pretending to show interest in Leno just to inflict monetary damage to NBC.

    ABC was the best fit for Leno, no worries about clearing FOX affiliates, no worries about Sony syndication. I figure he spent most of his energy planning to go to ABC. So when they both say that there was a deal and Leno was close to taking it, I tend to believe them.

    So why didn’t Leno go to ABC? Zucker must have done a whale of a sales pitch to get Leno to take 10pm especially when Leno himself did not believe it would work. NBC is your professional “home”, don’t leave. The company is in dire straits, you can save us countless millions of dollars a year from producing show after show that flop. The pay raise and the guarantee of being on the air.

    Leno had an explanation for not wanting to leave NBC in the book, but there is always that suspicion people have which may be true, that he could have found a new home at ABC, but if he stuck with NBC, there could be that opportunity that would come up in which he could get his revenge on the person who got him removed from his job to begin with. Presto chango, the rest is history.

  • Diana Santiago

    You may be right about Leno’s ABC deal, but I would rather subscribe to the saying “the simplest explanation is usually the right one.”

    I agree with you, anonymous. But remember that Gary believes that he knows more about Jay Leno thoughts, motives and actions than Bill Carter.

  • Brad

    I just wish Conan did things differently. I really do. I would have signed to a new contract with NBC to keep doing The Tonight Show at midnight but have the clause of not talking to other networks be exempted. You stay in the limelight for another 18 months while FOX works things out. Then you go off the air for 6 months, then come back in the fall on a new network.

  • Diana Santiago

    Brad, I wish Jay Leno did things differently too. However, every time I’ve said that, I’ve been berated because I’m “not Jay Leno’s manager to tell him what to do”.

    Now cue the “Diana always brings Leno when Conan is being criticized” comment, guys.

  • Gary Middleton

    Anonymous, we used the same Occam’s Razor. I know this sounds strange, but I think my theory is simpler. Jay tells jokes at 11:30 at night. If he had a network offer to do that, he’d have done it.

    The explanations from Iger and Leno (via Carter) seem- to me- more far fetched and contorted.

    Great respect for your views, just letting you know how I arrived at mine.

  • Gary Middleton

    Dave has a pretty fat pitch to swing at with Trump tonight.

  • Brad

    “I think my theory is simpler. Jay tells jokes at 11:30 at night. If he had a network offer to do that, he’d have done it.”

    Why would you take a 2-year guarantee at prime time if you could have gotten, what most likely would’ve been, 5-year contract in late night? Would be hard to say no to ABC unless Leno really thought it was too risky of a move.

  • Brad

    *Or all the talks were just that, talk. Not commitments.

  • Brad

    Leno most definitely should have done things differently. I think Conan not thinking “what if Jay doesn’t retire” when signing his Tonight Show contract was a stupid one at that. As Richter said, when the final year came for Leno, NBC kept telling everyone that they will place Leno somewhere else in the lineup.

    Jay’s thinking that “a 2-year guarantee at prime time will make sure Conan stays 11:30, that breaking it would resort to approximately hundred million dollars” was a nice one at that. It is a shame that NBC found a loophole in Conan’s contract about the timeslot situation. That killed all bargaining rights for Conan.

    I wish Conan would see you can only blame the other party so much for what happened rather than protecting yourself for all the “what ifs” that can go on in show business. “Expect the unexpected” and “always be prepared” are two mottos he should’ve followed back in 2009, but what can you do about it now.

  • anonymous

    @Gary
    I’m not saying you don’t have a valid point. I sure don’t know the truth, but that just happens to be how I interpret what information is available.

    Here’s a question. If there was no ABC deal, why do you think that is so? It’s not like FOX where you have to clear the affiliates of all their syndication deals. Leno was a hot commodity, the leader in his time spot. What impediment would there be to ABC getting him? Did Leno demand too much for ABC to afford? Leno was out of a job, I think he would be happy to get any reasonable deal. Who much power did Iger weild at ABC? Is it whatever he says goes? In that case, all that is needed is for Iger to put the axe to Nightline and Leno is part of the crew, which is why he was relieved he did not have to face all the unhappy news division folks.

    Even if that’s the case, I don’t blame Leno for staying with NBC. Put myself in his shoes, I’ld probably do the same thing. Some punk-ass kid comes to a company I’d been working for my whole life, gets me fired from my job. Heck, why should I leave. This is my company. I’ll stick around and show that whipper-snapper.

  • anonymous

    @Brad
    Just a conjecture, but I think if Conan had taken the 12:05 deal, Leno was only guaranteed for two years. Once those two years are up, Leno could no longer sue NBC and I think Zucker would have let him go and moved The Tonight Show back to 11:35pm. I think most people would agree that a 30 minutes Jay Leno Show at 11:35pm was not financially sound.

    Water under the bridge as they say.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Here’s a question. If there was no ABC deal, why do you think that is so? It’s not like FOX where you have to clear the affiliates of all their syndication deals. Leno was a hot commodity, the leader in his time spot.”

    The risk associated with paying peak market price for a guy nearly 60 years old. GE, McDonald’s, Microsoft, even Apple, may be great companies but if you buy their stock at the wrong time you can really take a beating.

  • anonymous

    That’s sound logic. So it means ABC could not afford the price Leno was asking. Leno could have gone to ABC but it would be for less than what NBC finally offered, ABC could not match NBC’s offer to Leno.

    Still, I would not categorize that as there was no way Leno could have ended at ABC, just that Leno took the better offer financially.

  • Gary Middleton

    Not sure it was necessarily the price Jay was asking as much as the cost of Leno’s Tonight Show. It was going to be a hugely expensive proposition even if Jay brought his personal price way down due to the cost of his very senior (aka expensive) team and infrastructure. It’s a high maintenance show. Leno was not going to go to ABC to do battle with Conan and Dave without all of his guns and ammo.

    My guess is ABC never made an offer for all that. Disney is famously cost-conscious, and this would be like a baseball GM making a huge deal for a 37-year-old free agent. I’m pretty sure the Yankees are still on the hook for more than $100 million dollars for A-Rod over the next few years, a guy they benched in the playoffs.

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