Netflix Subscribers Watch 11% Fewer Minutes Of Television Per Day Than Non-Subscribers

Categories: TV Ratings Reference

Written By

November 15th, 2012

In its latest Cross-Platform Report Nielsen notes that overall TV viewing declined slightly between Q2 2011 and Q2 2012 from 4;43 per day (4:23 Live, 0:20 DVR playback) to 4:40 (4:18 Live, 0:22 DVR). Interesting to see that's still above the 4:35 for Q2 2008. Broadcast TV ratings continue to get crushed, but overall TV viewing is relatively flat.

 

Digging a but further into the report, Multichannel News reports that Netflix subscribers watch 11% fewer minutes of television per day than non-subscribers. 

 
  • Josh

    So DVR viewership is consistently increasing at a rate of about 2 min/year. At that rate, it will equal live viewership in about 59 years. And people wonder why networks look entirely at Live+SD and ignore Live+3/Live+7…

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Bill Gorman

    “So DVR viewership is consistently increasing at a rate of about 2 min/year. At that rate, it will equal live viewership in about 59 years. And people wonder why networks look entirely at Live+SD and ignore Live+3/Live+7…”

    Worth noting that those numbers are for *all* TV viewing.

    If they were for primetime shows, the % of viewing by DVR would be higher. If they were for broadcast primetime shows and adults-18-49 they’d be even higher.

    Sadly, I don’t have those numbers.

  • DanaD

    I watch almost everything but one show which is Fringe in a time shifted DVR method.

  • svpike

    just goes to show you that they do not need to put adds inside the show. most people watch TV live.

  • eridapo

    @Bill,

    http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118062141

    In Nielsen’s national sample, DVR penetration has risen to 46% this fall (from 42% a year ago), and among adults 18-49 it is up to 51%. Overall DVR playback, meanwhile, is up 8% in total viewers and 3% in adults 18-49.

  • Chris

    I have a hard time believing this. Of course Nielsen people would be watching live TV, but outside of live sports, nobody I know watches live TV anymore. The coveted 18-49 demo watches pretty much everything via DVR, Hulu/Network websites/apps, and those “other” websites. It’s really surprising that an antiquated system still decides the fate of TV shows today.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Bill Gorman

    “In Nielsen’s national sample, DVR penetration has risen to 46% this fall (from 42% a year ago), and among adults 18-49 it is up to 51%. Overall DVR playback, meanwhile, is up 8% in total viewers and 3% in adults 18-49.”

    I could have been clearer. I was referring to the overall % of TV viewing via DVR for primetime shows/broadcast primetime/adults 18-49, not the increase in viewing by DVR.

  • ScienceNews

    I don’t think the statistics are being interpreted correctly. If you add up the numbers, the Netflix subscribers watch an average of 1 minute more than non-subscribers. They’re streaming it from multiple platforms, such as video game consoles and Blu-ray players, but the majority of those devices would still be connected to their TV.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Bill Gorman

    “nobody I know watches live TV anymore”

    There you go, representative sample of the US TV population right there!

  • Simon Jester

    @Chris – “Of course Nielsen people would be watching live TV, but outside of live sports, nobody I know watches live TV anymore.”

    Unless these people embody a cross section of American demographics — race, age, gender, income, etc. — “nobody you know” does not represent a relevant statistical sample.

  • Max Vrany

    @Bill Gorman, that’s what this all is. Representative samples.

  • Christian

    @Chris I’m 26 and I don’t have a DVR so I watch mostly everything live. And really people, commercials aren’t that big a deal. I usually take that time to check emails or text people. We’ve survived commercials for decades and we can continue to do so!

  • Ray

    @Chris

    My name is Ray. I live in California and am an Aquarian.

    It’s nice to meet you. I watched a live episode of a TV program two weeks ago. So now you know someone who watches live TV.

  • tjw

    @ScienceNews,

    The numbers laid out are pretty confusing, but I think when they say “TV” they mean broadcast television or cable television. The particular devices account for streaming and they’re not including video watched on computers. So Netflix users watch less TV over the air or through a cable even if the amount of video they watch on their television sets is about the same.

    My favorite stat from the report: Fewer than 5% of Americans are “cord cutters,” with broadband internet but no cable television while 20% of the country has cable but no broadband internet.

  • Lisa

    @Chris, I watch the vast majority of my TV live. And I watch a lot of TV. Most of the people I know also watch live, so I guess that “proves” that live viewing is the most popular method. Because of course the experience of a single person is automatically representative of the country as a whole, and I deserve to be that single person!

  • kalena_henden

    Nowhere on this chart does it show ‘Online Streaming’ as an option. I would like to see the chart that adds up all the hours of Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Amazon, TV Networks’ Websites, Yahoo, and other pay-per-view rental streaming services like Vudu, iTunes and CinemaNow.

    “TV” viewing has not gone down, it just moved to a better location. If ‘Video Games’ and ‘DVD Playback’ are on this list, ‘Online Streaming’ should be too.

  • Holly

    @Lisa,

    Because of course the experience of a single person is automatically representative of the country as a whole, and I deserve to be that single person!

    You are my favorite person on TVBTN today.

  • KS

    Its been a few months I switched on my Television.

  • tjw

    @kalena,

    If you read the full report, you’d be surpised at how relatively little video streaming there is. The average person who watches video on the internet spends less than 15 minutes per day doing so (that doesn’t factor in mobile or console streamers but it also doesn’t factor in people who don’t watch video online). Compare that to the average traditional TV viewer who spends almost five hours per day watching TV.

    Obviously, those numbers change by demographic, but even the demo that watches the most TV online (A18-24) only watches about 20 minutes per day, compared to 3:30 of TV among traditional TV watchers.

  • Temis

    @Chris, you remind me of the Republicans who thought Romney would win in a landslide because the Romney rallies were so enthusiastic. How could Obama win, everyone I know votes Republican! Meanwhile, people like me who read Nate Silver’s blog – based on verifiable science – got a far more accurate picture.

    Anyone who doesn’t like nielsen, let’s see where you are getting your statistics from.

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