Holocaust Survivor and Best-Selling Author Elie Wiesel Featured on 'Super Soul Sunday' December 9

Categories: Network TV Press Releases

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December 5th, 2012

via press release:

HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR AND BEST-SELLING AUTHOR ELIE WIESEL FEATURED ON “SUPER SOUL SUNDAY” DECEMBER 9 ON OWN

 

Oprah Winfrey will sit down with Nobel Peace Prize winner and New York Times best-selling author Elie Wiesel on the Emmy® Award-winning series “Super Soul Sunday” in an all-new episodeOprah and Nobel Prize Winner Elie Wiesel: Living with an Open Heart” premiering Sunday, December 9 at 11:00 a.m. ET/PT on OWN.

 

In the intimate interview, which falls on the first day of Hanukkah, Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor and the author of the internationally-acclaimed memoir, Night, talks about facing his own mortality when, at age eighty-two, he was rushed into open heart surgery, as detailed in his latest memoir, Open Heart.  His fears associated with the lifesaving operation allowed him to re-examine his career and deepen his devotion to his family.  Wiesel talks about being a witness to history as a Holocaust survivor, losing his life savings in the Bernard Madoff scandal, and what he hopes will be the destiny of his life’s work.

 

A special re-broadcast of “The Oprah Winfrey Show” original episode “A Special Presentation: Oprah and Elie Wiesel At Auschwitz Death Camp,” where in 2006 Oprah and Wiesel traveled to Poland together, will air immediately following, from noon-1 p.m. ET/PT on OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network.

 

 

EXCERPT:  Oprah Winfrey and Elie Wiesel discuss being a Holocaust survivor:

 

 

WINFREY:  You've said that Holocaust survivors are becoming an endangered species.  Indeed, you all are.  Yet you don't fear the memory of the Holocaust will ever be lost.

WIESEL:  Why?

WINFREY:  Why?

WIESEL:  I'll tell you why.  Because, you know, all of us who went through that experience considered ourselves as witnesses. When the last witness will be gone, I don't want to be that one.  It's too tragic.  What will happen?  So on one hand, you could become pessimistic that the last witness -- all the knowledge, all the experience, all the memories will be buried.  Then what? So I came up with a theory which I think is valid.  To listen to a witness is to become one.

WINFREY:  To listen to a witness --

WIESEL:  Is to become a witness.

WINFREY:  To become a witness.

WIESEL:  So therefore those who have listened to us, who have read my books and other survivors' memoirs, we have a lot of witnesses now.  And they will protect not only our past, but also their future.

 

EXCERPT:  Oprah Winfrey and Elie Wiesel discuss losing his life savings in the Bernard Madoff scandal:

 

WINFREY:  I have to ask you this because we spoke a couple of years ago and you had just been through a stunning experience, of all the stunning things that had happened to you, but when you got the call that you had lost your entire life savings, as well as $15 million dollars of the foundation that you and Marion had worked your whole lives for because of Bernie Madoff…What was the first thing you did?  I mean, you just -- that's an unbelievable call to get.

WIESEL:  I remember we were out and we came home and it was almost near midnight.  The telephone rang.  And we were frightened.  Midnight.

WINFREY:  Midnight.

WIESEL:  It was Elisha.  Elisha said, first of all, don't worry.  Everybody's good in the family.  Nothing happened.  Nothing.  But now sit down.

WINFREY:  Sit down.  This is your son.

WIESEL:  My son.  And our son -- then he was a member of our Board.  And he actually didn't like the idea that we had placed so much money with Madoff.

WINFREY:  Because you'd placed all the money with Madoff.

WIESEL:  Yes.  He said too much.  And so that was a few months earlier before that. And we told him, come on, we know people who did that. If I told you the names, you would be surprised.  The most prestigious names in the financial world.

WINFREY:  Yes.

WIESEL:  Have given him money.  So why shouldn't we? He said, he's in jail. We looked at each other and our reaction was, we have seen worse.

WINFREY:  Mm.  You and Marion.

WIESEL:  Oprah, both she and I have seen worse.

 

Broadcast clips are available upon request.

 
  • Columbo

    So Wiesel gave his entire life savings and $15 million he raised for his Holocaust foundation to Bernie Madoff? Good job, dummy.

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