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Cable News Ratings for Thursday, January 3, 2013

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Written By

January 4th, 2013

 

Live + Same Day Cable News Daily Ratings for Thursday, January 3, 2013

 

P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
Total Day
FNC       1,179            234            472
CNN         348            101            142
MSNBC         591            181            278
CNBC         192             56            103
FBN           59             12             23
HLN         183             78            105
Primetime P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC       1,938            381            717
CNN         455            151            195
MSNBC       1,061            278            496
CNBC         285            157            183
FBN           51             14             25
HLN         312            138            187
Net Morning programs (6-9 AM) P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC FOX & Friends       1,047            237            484
CNN Early Start/Starting Point         256            104            130
MSNBC Morning Joe         537            228            289
CNBC Squawk Box         131             26             62
HLN Morning Express w/ Meade         213            122            158
Net 5PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC FIVE, THE       2,099            304            854
CNN Situation Room         569            136            198
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS         912            197            370
CNBC FAST MONEY         207             57            112
HLN EVENING EXPRESS           85             37             64
Net 6PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC SPECIAL RPT W/BRET BAIER       1,974            261            672
CNN Situation Room         441            119            135
MSNBC POLITICS NATION         805            200            347
CNBC Mad Money         155             55            101
HLN EVENING EXPRESS         114             46             62
Net 7PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC The Fox Report W/S.SMITH       1,589            287            592
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT         473            161            184
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS         785            223            368
CNBC Kudlow Report         135             16             54
HLN JANE VELEZ-MITCHELL         217             68            110
Net 8PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC THE OREILLY FACTOR       2,786            481            954
CNN Anderson Cooper 360         563            186            264
MSNBC Ed Show         948            211            406
CNBC FACEBOOK OBSESSION, THE         229            133            134
HLN Nancy Grace         357            135            242
Net 9PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC Hannity       1,740            357            703
CNN Piers Morgan Tonight         433            127            158
MSNBC Rachel Maddow Show       1,189            334            590
CNBC BILLIONS BEHIND BARS         287            151            182
HLN What Would You Do         283            126            155
Net 10PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC ON THE RECORD W/GRETA       1,263            303            485
CNN Anderson Cooper 360         367            140            162
MSNBC Last Word W/ L. ODONNELL       1,046            290            492
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         338            187            235
HLN What Would You Do         296            152            164
Net 11PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC THE OREILLY FACTOR         994            304            490
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT         302            122            116
MSNBC Ed Show         560            186            270
CNBC Mad Money         147             59            102
HLN SHOWBIZ TONIGHT         207             96            117

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For other days cable news ratings click here.

P2+ = viewers over the age of 2

(25-54) = Adults 25-54 viewing

(35-64) = Adults 35-64 viewing

Prime Time = 8-11pm

LIVE+SD: The number that watched a program either while it was broadcast OR watched via DVR on the same day [through 3AM the next day] the program was broadcast. For more information see Numbers 101.

Scratch = when a show's audience fails to meet minimum Nielsen reporting levels. For more information go here.

Nielsen Cable Network Coverage Estimates (as of July, 2012)

CNN/HLN: 99.727 million HHs

CNBC: 97.497 million HHs

FNC: 97.981 million HHs

MSNBC: 95.526 million HHs

Fox Business: 68.407 million HHs

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  • Faith3

    Letmethink,

    “most studies independent of the developer don’t show such success”. What studies? Were these studies conducted using children with disabilities are with children who were lacking skills that did not have a disability? I need to know this because it is essential. That is why I called it an apple to orange comparison. It does not in any form or fashion mean you are teaching to the bottom of the class when you use a program designed to help children who lack specific skills to gain those skills. In an RTI model, not all children would be subjected to learn skills they already know and have mastered.

    You keep saying you don’t trust government to help but you did not respond to the fact that the government did not provide any specific program. Our school system did. We did the research, we did the training, we did the organization, so on and so forth. The only thing the government provided was funds. Take those funds away and we would have had nothing in order to implement this program. So, if it failed, it would have been that particular school system to blame. It just happened to be successful and the school earned an award. Since then, the grant is no longer available to allocate funds so I have a feeling specialist that were trained to take small groups of children have been laid off and so it goes.

  • Letmethink

    @Faith Presently, for a school system to show performance, it can costs a small fortune when you talk about benchmarking progress. That is a mandate in Race to the Top schools but that mandate isn’t necessarily being funded through ‘those’ that mandated it

    Benchmarking and testing has been a monumental failure. Teaching within a scope and sequence and testing at the end of a sequence for proficiency as was done in the past seems to be the most logical. As we have seen with the gov mandated testing, teachers cheat. The gov intervenes and lowers requirements when they can’t be met. This is the most non-sensical thing the fed gov–both dema and rep– has pushed on schools.

  • Letmethink

    Faith, again, I say, you can not use MA as an example for the rest of the country. You live in a wealthy privileged state. Second, the program has failed more than it has succeeded. You say it worked in your state–above 50%–do you have stats to prove that?
    Being familiar with the program I will disagree with you once again. It does teach to the bottom. It slows down the ones at the top who do not need all of the redundancy in the program.

  • Letmethink

    Gotta’ run–church and then friends coming for lunch. Will ck back in tonight and continue this intersting discussion.

  • Faith3

    d.d,

    Yes, they fail internationally but why is that d.d? Is it because we spend too much money? If we spent less would we go up in standing? Naturally that argument shows that money is only but one factor in the equation. The first question I would pose is how is the inequality index in these other countries that perform; better, near or worse? My next question is how do these countries allocate funds? Is it more, even, less or the same? Who is being included in these test? Are all children being sampled like in this country or just specific students? I could probably fill a page with questions. There are plenty of factors that need to be examined. I think your parent involvement statement is an important one and studies do find that parents that spend time, do things, and help with their children’s education fare better in achievement test and other cognitive measures as well as have better school outcome. I would be curious to know if some of these countries have high parental involvement. If they do, that is fantastic but that does not excuse a US school system from having to pick up the slack. There is no other way around it and my guess is those specific services probably costs us more than countries that don’t need it. Yes, cultures are different and that may have a negative or positive effect on performance in schools.

  • Faith3

    “Faith overall, more money is spent on schools in poor areas on poor students in schools.” Is a false statement.

    I agree with you statement, “It is also the 3rd richest state in the US so you are not dealing with the poverty seen in other states.”

    Also, it is your strawman that we need more government and more money.

    Where is your evidence that the top level is declining?

  • Faith3

    Letmethink,

    I see we agree on some points about mandated testing. A large reason this Race to the Top is a bomb is because of all the mandates and many are not being funded by the government. Sorry, but if the Federal government wants to mandate something, they have the responsibility to fund it. It is only reasonable and fair.

    This question if for d.d, if you don’t think district involvement should have a sway in the school decisions who do you think should?

    “You say it worked in you state, do you have stats to prove it?” I never said the state of MA enacted that program. I specifically said our school system did. Where are your stats? I want to know the group that was sampled. It is critical when looking at stats to have valid and reliable ones. If you are sampling a group of children who specifically have special needs it is not the same as sampling children who do not.

    As far as your statement about slowing down the “ones at the top” you did not read my post about the RTI model. The ones at the top don’t need the program and do not receive it.

  • Faith3

    To address the “class warfare” comment, is it class warfare to say if the federal government wants to mandate schools it is their responsibility to fund those mandates? I think not. Also, is it class warfare to bring up the fact that the achievement gap is getting wider for low income children, and one factor may be income itself? Really? I guess we can’t have an honest discussion because it is being shut down when you start using left vs right and other loaded terms.

  • 1nancy2

    Faith
    “I guess we can’t have an honest discussion because it is being shut down when you start using left vs right and other loaded terms.” I see that you continue to hammer away, however, keep at it and Letmethink is OK. It’s just that all 3 of us have a diff. point of view. That does not mean that we can’t learn from each other and ‘get along.’ OK, BBL and hope to see you here again!

  • d.d.

    @Letmethink
    To me this study is pushing the class warfare and not looking at other issues that influence education

    The study looks at one area for the disparity . Stanford education ,SUSE Open Archive section, is chock full conservative articles that do affect education, too.

    I read Reardon’s whole study. Just because he leans left doesn’t make him less scholarly . Stanford publishes both L & R but leans Right because of the Hoover Institute. My belief is that parental income does affect performance . Higher incomes value education more. Even if the parents don’t help, they know how to navigate the bureaucracy of the school system to get their children help or employ tutors to help teach their children.

    Faith & I agree on almost nothing ,e.g. , the teachers unions. I saw the most recent damage the AFT & the NEA did to my native state of Wisconsin. I am a believer in the Association of American Educators (AAE) “the largest national, non-union, professional educators’ organization, advancing the profession by offering a modern approach to teacher representation and educational advocacy, as well as promoting professionalism, collaboration and excellence without a partisan.” None of their money goes to support political parties.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNJ1DuK2dl8

    Michigan (CAPCON) is now linking this video.

    @Faith This question if for d.d, if you don’t think district involvement should have a sway in the school decisions who do you think should?

    As far as I know, this has never been the basis of study, although, more people are demanding a charge in state law to let local school board control their own purse strings. “Eighty percent of the school boards nationwide have the authority to raise taxes to fund the educational program,” though.

    Although my children are out of school. I try to remain current, Not being an educator myself, I follow , primarily Stanford, Harvard Kennedy School , &, Fordham , along with ‘Education Next,’ Mi.’s Mackinac Center, & , the, Illinois Policy Center.

    Overall, we should really be ashamed of our K-12 educational system . Parents , need to value & become involved in their children’s educational process, teachers need better accreditation…. much like the stringent 18 hours of RN testing ; they need to quit protecting poor teachers , to regain their enthusiasm for their jobs, to quit running to the union for every perceived boo-boo, & to realize how the public views their union crutch. If parents & teachers aren’t willing to do this , then , they deserve all the harsh comments that they get.

    —————-

    Now, I’ve talked about this all I want to for today. The rest of you have at it.

  • Doug Z

    Letmethink, Faith3, DD, Nancy

    Schools can do nothing to fix the problem.It is the parents, lawyers, ect.
    Really it is the parents. Without them nothing will work. To pretend anything other than parents will fix the problem is the problem. I do not know how to fix that problem. Good luck with that.

  • Doug Z

    Letmethink, Faith3, DD, Nancy

    Our schools look bad because of the parents.They are not bad . It is the household they live in.In college the professor told us to look to the left and to the right, one will not be here to graduate. It will be that persons fault.

  • Faith3

    “Faith & I agree on almost nothing, e.g the teachers unions.”

    So now we agree on almost nothing because we disagree about the teachers union? No wonder why this country is so polarized. It seems we agreed that Stanford University is a scholarly source. We agreed that parent participation in education is important and we agree that TN is a beautiful state. We even agree that teacher’s need excellent accreditation and I’m sure there are thousands of other things we agree on…you just may be surprised.

    Now back on topic, the school board does have control over the budget. State law in some states is changing it so that they don’t have that control.

    Also, the topic being discussed was the income/achievement gap and how poverty has had an impact on education in this country. It really is not a “union issue” no matter how much you like to beat that drum. Why miss an opportunity I guess.

  • Hillbilly

    I got one of the first 7 right & quit. I think their wrong. :)

    There’s 20 questions.

  • Hillbilly

    A bunch of cowards in both parties.

    The fact is, despite all the hubbub of the past two years, the federal government has still not made any meaningful spending cuts. And that is mostly because meaningful spending cuts are virtually impossible without addressing entitlements or the Department of Defense.
    Congress and the president tried to do just that in the 2011 debt-ceiling deal, yet the fiscal cliff deal shows that Washington, when faced with such cuts, apparently doesn’t have the stomach to let them take effect.

    Source.

    But signs are that it is coming. Credit-rating agency Moody’s has said “the US’s credit rating could be affected ‘negatively’ if Washington fails to take further steps to rein in the deficit.” All parties know the US cannot risk further downgrades to its credit rating.

  • Hillbilly

    Doug Z
    Posted January 5, 2013 at 2:56 PM
    What do we do about the parents is the big question.Teachers can not do it without them. My parents saved me. Every-nite we studied.

    ———————————–

    Have them help your dragon. ;)

  • Hillbilly

    The problem with education is there’s not enough of them female teachers who want to have sex with their students. Just think if some hot looking teacher said – “I’ll go on a date with anybody who gets an A on the test.” I would have been on the honor role every year. :cool:

    C’ya

  • 1966

    @hillbilly
    I got 7 of 20 correct.

  • Letmethink

    @ Nancy–thanks for the compliment and back at you. You are a good one also.

  • Letmethink

    @Hillbily–I think that is the problem–lol. You figured it out so quickly without any research at all.

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