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Cable News Ratings for Monday, February 18, 2013

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February 20th, 2013

 

Live + Same Day Cable News Daily Ratings for February 18, 2013

P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
Total Day
FNC       1,216            228            480
CNN         391            116            163
MSNBC         491            152            236
CNBC         155             60             79
FBN           42             13             24
HLN         233            102            145
Primetime P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC       2,197            343            759
CNN         623            159            254
MSNBC       1,123            321            497
CNBC         274             99            145
FBN           30             10             15
HLN         338            132            193
Net Morning programs (6-9 AM) P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC FOX & Friends       1,083            233            489
CNN Early Start/Starting Point         249            104            131
MSNBC Morning Joe         390            138            193
CNBC Squawk Box           98             23             37
HLN Morning Express w/ Meade         248            149            178
Net 5PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC FIVE, THE       2,008            343            782
CNN Situation Room         583            129            204
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS         733            183            261
CNBC SHADOW BILLIONAIRE         133             46             55
HLN EVENING EXPRESS         213             68             94
Net 6PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC SPECIAL RPT W/BRET BAIER       2,016            261            724
CNN Situation Room         448            152            200
MSNBC POLITICS NATION         656            174            281
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         135             70             59
HLN EVENING EXPRESS         244             49            124
Net 7PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC The Fox Report W/S.SMITH       1,784            208            618
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT         485            161            248
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS         694            200            338
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         146             73             76
HLN JANE VELEZ-MITCHELL         318            115            206
Net 8PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC THE OREILLY FACTOR       3,075            449         1,074
CNN Anderson Cooper 360         807            233            358
MSNBC Ed Show         939            257            438
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         286            117            128
HLN Nancy Grace         396            142            223
Net 9PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC Hannity       2,251            355            756
CNN Piers Morgan Tonight         537            129            227
MSNBC HUBRIS: SELLING IRAQ WAR       1,456            432            633
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         272             95            142
HLN Dr. Drew ON CALL         349            139            203
Net 10PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC ON THE RECORD W/GRETA       1,254            224            446
CNN Anderson Cooper 360         525            116            176
MSNBC Last Word W/ L. ODONNELL         971            275            419
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         263             85            165
HLN Nancy Grace         269            115            153
Net 11PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC THE OREILLY FACTOR         995            243            451
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT         327            121            138
MSNBC Ed Show         509            129            227
CNBC AMERICAN GREED         288            121            154
HLN SHOWBIZ TONIGHT         212             96            126

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For other days cable news ratings click here.

P2+ = viewers over the age of 2

(25-54) = Adults 25-54 viewing

(35-64) = Adults 35-64 viewing

Prime Time = 8-11pm

LIVE+SD: The number that watched a program either while it was broadcast OR watched via DVR on the same day [through 3AM the next day] the program was broadcast. For more information see Numbers 101.

Scratch = when a show's audience fails to meet minimum Nielsen reporting levels. For more information go here.

Nielsen Cable Network Coverage Estimates (as of July, 2012)

CNN/HLN: 99.727 million HHs

CNBC: 97.497 million HHs

FNC: 97.981 million HHs

MSNBC: 95.526 million HHs

Fox Business: 68.407 million HHs

Nielsen TV Ratings Data: ©2013 The Nielsen Company. All Rights Reserved.

 
  • Cathy

    Coffee, So you work out as you teach right?

  • Matthew

    @d.d.

    Don’t forget Wilson instituted the first federal income tax since the Civil War, & he still had a deficit.

    Bit misleading, this. His pre-WW1 budgets averaged deficits of 0.72% of GDP. His final two budgets in office were surpluses. Harding (probably the most corrupt president in our history) simply inherited what was an already on-going budget trend. Wilson WAS terrible, but his actual budgets don’t fit the overall pro-Supply Side theme of your post.

    Remember the Roaring 20’s . This was the Harding & Coolidge era.

    Yes, the roaring 20s, AKA the Bull Market Bubble; lack of government intervention does deserve credit for that period of prodigious economic growth. Lack of government intervention also deserves credit for the catastrophic economic collapse once the inevitable ‘the Emperor has no clothes’ moment came for that bubble.

    After the Cold War ended, overall federal spending fell to 18% of GDP in 2000 from 22% in 1991. But again the economy boomed.

    And again, a big part of that was a bubble. We could go so far as to call the era of Big Liberalism (lets call it, roughly, 1932 – 1980) a government-driven bubble as well, that eventually burst with stagflation, but it was also a remarkably stable and long-lasting bubble, relative to the ups and downs of the last two decades, or the instability of the 19th Century.
    __________________

    More broadly, I think it’s hard to really say “Coolidge did this, maybe we can replicate that,” when we’re in a 21st Century economy, and trying to navigate 21st Century geopolitical problems. For example, we no longer have the luxury of total isolation, which has consequences for both our economy, and our federal budgets.

    It’s fair to say that the government has grown in all of the wrong ways, but my philosophical conclusions about this differ from proponents of austerity; the austere look at this situation and say “this is bad, because it’s the nature of sovereign borrowing and spending to be bad.” I say “this is bad, because the people in charge of appropriating the funds are bad.”

    In other words, if I could do 2008 – 2012 all over again, I wouldn’t spend less (well…), I’d spend different. I’ve made this example before, and I’ll make it again: to me, it’s the difference between a bank extending someone credit, and that person using that credit to build a successful business, which eventually balloons into something enduring for both the borrower and the lender (e.g. WW2 manufacturing infrastructure, Manhattan Project, Apollo), vs. extending someone credit and them using the money to buy a bunch of crap for themselves and their friends (Recovery Act).

  • Matthew

    This is family income. So, if you are married, over 50, have been with the same company for 10 years, you are likely in the top 10%

    This seems overly optimistic. I accept that I could be wrong, as I don’t have time right now to look up age-to-income demographics, but just as a matter of language and mathematics, how can we describe an event with 10% probability (making $113k+) as more likely than an event with 90% probability? Maybe if you further filter that to – People over 50, at the same company for 10 years, with a college degree/in a union/working for the government (where you can easily go up the food chain, regardless of skill, just by virtue of longevity).

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