NBC: Three Sitcoms Could Be Renewed Besides 'Parks & Rec', But The Cancellation Bear Is Still Chicken

Categories: Cancel/Renew Index,Cancel/Renew NBC Shows

Written By

March 12th, 2013

Click this link for the latest NBC renewal / cancellation information:


bear-chicken
Our Renew / Cancel Index predicts the network's decision on renewal or cancellation for scripted broadcast primetime shows by the end of the 2012-13 season in May, 2013.  (includes results from December 31, 2012- March 10, 2013):


Program Status Renew/ Cancel Index
Do No Harm* canceled 0.50
Smash :oops: 0.65
Animal Practice* canceled 0.66
The New Normal :oops: 0.77
1600 Penn :oops: 0.78
Guys With Kids :oops: 0.82
Go On :| :| :| 0.89
Whitney :| :| :| 0.90
Deception :cry: :cry: 0.91
30 Rock* final season complete 0.93
Community :| :| :| 0.95
Grimm (F) :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 1.03
Parenthood* :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 1.08
Parks & Recreation :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 1.13
Law & Order: SVU :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 1.20
Chicago Fire :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: 1.41
The Office final season 1.43
Up All Night :oops: pending
Revolution :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: pending

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The Cancellation Bear is of the mind that Community, Go On and Whitney are all potential NBC sitcom renewals (Parks & Recreation is certain to be renewed), but he's not making the move yet. Chicken? Cluck! But Community's 1.9 premiere rating said "certain renewal" and two weeks later it hit a series low 1.1 rating. Its recovered since then, but the cancellation bear is still worried about touching that potentially hot stove again.

Better to Follow The Bear, Than Be Chased By Him. This season you can follow the Cancellation Bear on Twitter via @TheCancelBear. The Cancellation Bear will retweet all the Renew/Cancel Index post titles and links as well as engage in a little more back and forth banter than we do on our standard @TVbytheNumbers Twitter feed.
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*shows no longer on the air have their Renew/Cancel Index "frozen" at the point they left the schedule.

From now through the end of the broadcast season in May, the Renew/Cancel Index values will only be calculated using new episodes airing during 2013. However, until new episodes of a show air in 2013, I will keep the "old"  Fall predictions in the table.

Want to know what the NBC Renew/Cancel Index table looked like at the end of the Fall season? Click here.

Notes:

  • :oops: - certain to be cancelled by May, 2013
  • :cry: :cry:- more likely to be cancelled than renewed by May, 2013
  • :| :| :| - toss up between renewal or cancellation by May, 2013
  • :) :) :) :) - more likely to be renewed than cancelled by May, 2013
  • :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: - certain to be renewed by May, 2013

The Renew/Cancel Index is the ratio of a scripted show's new episode adults 18-49 ratings relative to the new episode ratings of the other scripted shows on its own network. It's calculated by dividing a show's new episode Live+Same Day adults 18-49 average rating by the Live+Same Day new episode average of all the new scripted show episodes on the show's own network. The network's average ratings in the calculation are not time weighted (ie. hour long shows are not weighted twice what 30 minute shows are).

(F) -Fridays: Shows airing on Fridays were renewed with significantly lower than average Indexes.

How would the Renew / Cancel Index Have Done Predicting Last Season's Scripted Show Fates? Check out how the Renew / Cancel Index predicted renewals and cancellations from past television seasons.

 
  • Brian J

    @Peter:

    After this season, Community will have 84 episodes. The more is usually better for syndication, but since 88 seems to be the golden number, isn’t it close enough?

    Sony is supposedly relentless when it comes to pushing its shows for syndication, but why would NBC really be interested in the show any more at this point? I think it makes more sense to try its luck at some newer shows.

  • TV Addict

    COMMUNITY WILL BE RENEWED FOR EXACTLY TWO MORE SEASONS!!!!
    #sixseasonsandamovie

  • a p garcia

    Other than Park and Rec and maybe Whitney, I would not notice if NBC cancelled all their comedies. I can’t believe “The Bible” was offered to NBC and NBC turned it down. Maybe NBC should fire their prime time programmer. as a way out of the bottom.

  • ABC hater

    I’d do it like this:

    Monday

    8 – The Voice
    10 – New drama

    Did great last Fall. Might as well do again.

    Tuesday

    8 – New comedy
    8:30 – The Voice results
    9:30 – New comedy
    10 – Parenthood

    This may sound tricky, but the Voice audience could watch the first comedy while waiting for their show. Also, it would probably grow its numbers and help NBC to win this night too, while providing a better lead-in for the 9:30 comedy and Parenthood, which stays where it currently is to show stability.

    Wednesday

    8 – Revolution
    9 – Their best new drama
    10 – Chicago Fire

    Given that Revolution keeps its ratings at Fall levels, it could anchor a night and would provide a good launching pad for a new heavily promoted genre drama. Chicago Fire is doing good, so it stays put.

    Thursday

    8 – Parks & Recreation
    8:30 – New comedy
    9 – Their best new comedy
    9:30 – New comedy
    10 – SVU

    Arguably their most troubled night, it would need to be majorly promoted to not flop entirely. Risky, but could bring in the new hits they desperately need. If CBS doesn’t expand comedy this night, at least… SVU would help to not let the night flop completely giving not impressive, but at least solid, numbers at 10.

    Friday

    8 – Reality
    9 – Grimm
    10 – Dateline

    Doing. I just wouldn’t mix two newsmagazines and would rather have a cheap reality to begin the night. Grimm is a self-starter as shown previously.

    Saturday

    8 – Revolution (R)
    9 – New Wednesday drama (R)
    10 – Law & Order: SVU (R)

    4.5 hours of new shows to promote surrounded by their strongest offerings as of now. Keep some good shows for midseason as well, as they have the Olympics to promote them.

    Spackle: Community (if Sony is willing to keep it going), Whitney (they own it, don’t they? Better than keep a Warner or a FOX show, I suppose)

  • Brian J

    Some points, before I get to one hypothetical schedule:

    1. I really, truly believe NBC is going to clean house. It ordered more comedy pilots than it usually does for next season, beyond what it would just to replace 30 Rock and The Office. It has a lot of holes to fill, true, but few if any of the shows really deserve another chance when it comes to the ratings.

    2. Syndication almost certainly matters more than it would in most cases, as all comedies are near each other and you could make a good case for canceling all of them. If it’s a choice between Parks and Community, I think Parks is a clear winner and would be renewed. It’s owned by NBC, it’s already been sold into syndication, and it already has more episodes than Community. It’s also the best reviewed comedy on NBC of any that might come back.

    3. NBC’s biggest worry, more than its failure to launch any successful shows midseason, is the possibility The Voice returns down in a big way. Obviously, up would be best, even if it were up a little, and for all I know, that might be what happens. But being down just a hair would be acceptable, too, as long as it’s still able to notch at least a 3.0. That means Revolution will be higher than it would otherwise be, which means NBC has at least one legitimate success story in the form of a drama for this season. Combined with Grimm from last season, that ain’t so bad.

    4. Of course, if NBC were smart, wouldn’t it schedule Hannibal for Tuesdays? Does NBC really think it’s a turkey? Even if it does, why not give viewers a chance to decide and for the show to have the best chance possible at success? If it were a ratings success, that’d be two successful dramas for this season, and NBC could be seen as making legitimate progress. I’d be astonished if Smash came back next season, so what’s the harm in moving it?

    5. I think NBC’s focus has to be on finding a legitimately successful scripted comedy for next season–one that can stand on its own. It has the new Michael J. Fox show, which was supposedly given promises about scheduling and marketing. Lots of people have suggested it should go on Thursdays, which makes sense, but I think it’d be better on another night, where there’s less competition. Fridays is too low profile, Wednesdays are possible but harder since ABC has two programs that are successful and very successful at 8:00 and 9:00 that are similar in tone and style. Mondays are possible but are better for another type of show (more on that in a moment). That leaves Tuesdays. I think this is the best night because there’s less competition than Thursdays and, right now, it’s only comedy competition is New Girl, which seems to be going after a different type of viewer and isn’t that lethal. It would also have The Voice as a possible lead-in, and while the show could probably stand on its own, this would give it a boost.

    6. Along the same lines as (5), NBC should spend a shit ton of money–$100 million, perhaps; it supposedly spent $25 million on marketing Smash–promoting this show. Even if you don’t love MJF, you don’t hate him, but most people like to love him. And given his condition, it’s easy to root for him. His return to scripted programming would be a big deal that NBC could milk for all its worth. Given that Two and a Half Men was able to get around 28 million viewers for its first post-Sheen episode, months after all of the nonsense occurred involving a much less sympathetic and liked figure than MJF, I don’t think it should be a problem to get a big number for the first episode. NBC should spend whatever is necessary to get a massive initial tune-in, because if the show is any good (and it should do whatever it can, including just letting them do whatever they want, to make sure it is), it should be a big hit that will be able to stand on its own.

    7. And if this new MJF show is a big hit, it will support whatever comes after it. It should pick a similarly formatted and theme appropriate show, like its pilot Welcome to the Family, to come after it, and again, make sure it’s good. (Easier said than done, of course, but if it involves filming the pilot 10 times and spending lots of money, it shouldn’t hesitate.) So then, NBC would have two big hits on its hands–possibly the two biggest comedies on television. It would also probably have a hit show in whatever drama comes at 10:00 (more on that shortly).

    8. It should also shorten The Voice by one half hour on Mondays and launch a new comedy there. I’ve said it should have done that this season, but it’s no less true for next season. NBC needs to give a new show as much exposure as possible, and this is pretty much the only way to do it right now. There’s less competition on Mondays–only Mike & Molly directly, and perhaps something new and easier to go up against if CBS moves that show. I think this should be a multi cam–the John Mulaney pilot, perhaps, or maybe the Sean Hayes show.

    9. There’s no guarantee this would work, but I think it could. To ensure success, NBC should consider focusing its efforts on three to four comedies at most. One will obviously be the new MJF show, and the others should be whatever comes after it and whatever would go after The Voice on Mondays in my example. The only other shows would be something that comes after Parks (which, I should add, should be renewed and probably will be renewed) or whatever else might be renewed its place. If NBC decides to renew Parks and Community, for instance, it shouldn’t really focus on them at all. But if it renewed Parks and bought one other niche-like show (the one involving Parker Posey, for instance), it might put it on Thursdays and give it a chance to grow and/or work out some early creative kinks. BUT by focusing its resources, especially its ad dollars, on fewer shows, it might give them a greater chance at success. If even just one of these shows is successful, NBC can then begin to move forward.

    10. Now, I think these moves would work. If they do, NBC can they make some staggered moves to add to its scripted programming. For instance, if the new MJF show and whatever comes after it (let’s say it’s Welcome to the Family) work, perhaps NBC could then (a) either move Welcome to the Family to 8:00 and put two new sitcoms in between then or (b) make The Voice a half hour on Tuesdays and put one new comedy there. Similarly, it could pair another multi came (whatever doesn’t go on in the fall out of the John Mulaney show, the Sean Hayes show, Joe, Jane & Joe, or something else) on Mondays, shortening The Voice by another half hour, and no matter what airs at 9:00 or 9:30, it could have two multi cams on the night. That’s four to six comedies on its schedule, at least, and that’s a good number.

    11. If NBC chooses (a) from (10) and puts four comedies on Tuesdays, what does it do with The Voice? My bold suggestion is to move it to Sundays after football ends. It’d almost certainly be able to manage at least a 2.5, and there’s a good chance it could retain its entire audience or even grow. NBC would probably instantly dominate Sundays and could schedule some new, similarly themed and formatted shows (the Krysten Ritter pilot and About a Boy, perhaps) with a new drama or, perhaps, something like Hannibal, which is only going to have 13 episodes per season. ASSUMING this works even to some small degree, NBC would have three successful nights, and even if nothing else worked for it throughout the rest of the week, it’d be in a vastly improved position.

    12. But it can’t give up on the rest of the nights, can it? Of course not, and this brings us to the dramas. As I hinted elsewhere, I’d leave Revolution in its current slot unless it somehow surges upon its return. Right now, Grimm and that show are the only very safe bets for returning, with Chicago Fire just below it, and with Parenthood is right below that show. I’d bet SVU also returns, although at this point, I’d give it a final and perhaps shortened season. But let’s assume that all four of those shows return. (Leave aside Hannibal for the moment, as it will probably come back midseason unless it’s a massive hit right away, if it comes back at all.) Somehow, I doubt NBC will want to give an older show exposure to the new MJF sitcom, so I anticipate at least one new drama wherever that show goes. And this will probably be a safer drama.

    13. A lot of the pilots NBC currently has are sci fi and/or possibly violent and/or not traditional cop and medical shows. Considering Revolution and Chicago Fire would seem like an odd pairing, I imagine NBC will pair a lot of these new shows together. And considering I have, in my example, no new sitcoms or possibly no sitcoms at all on Thursdays, this might mean having nights of all dramas or, for a while, two dramas and Rock Center or Dateline until midseason.

    14. NBC should really consider working its ass of to find a new unscripted hit that might bring in viewers to a new show. I’ve made the suggestion of Supermarket Sweep in the past, but any number of ideas might work. This would help in any number of ways, especially lessening the work of promoting a bunch of new shows at once. NBC should also use America’s Got Talent to build up a weaker night, like Thursdays, over the summer, to expose viewers to its newer shows, like Grimm and Chicago Fire, and prep viewers for scheduling shifts.

    15. And one final point before I get to the actual schedule: NBC should stagger its releases. Given that Rock Center does no worse and in some cases better than its scripted shows and Dateline does the same AND given that it has some stable reality shows like The Biggest Loser, it doesn’t need to throw everything against the wall at once. It also has The Olympics in early 2014, which should give the network a chance to promote new and older shows.

    So, while it’s hard to say what, if anything, NBC will order to series at this point, I’m basing this schedule off of what it has ordered to pilot already and what I think will help them across the board:

    –in the fall:

    MONDAY: The Voice until 9:30, followed by a new multi cam, followed by Revolution

    TUESDAY: The Voice until 9:00, followed by the MJF sitcom, followed by another single cam family show, followed by something like After Hours or I Am Victor

    WEDNESDAY, if Chicago Fire stays: Hatfields & McCoys/After Hours/Parenthood, then one of the aforementioned, followed by Chicago Fire

    WEDNESDAY, if Chicago Fire moves: Hatfields & McCoys/After Hours/Parenthood, followed by The Blacklist

    Thursday: Grimm at 9:00, surrounded by some combination of Believe, The Sixth Gun, and Bloodline, and/or Crossbones and Wonderland at midseason.

    Note: it’s possible that Parks and a niche show could go at 8:00 and 8:30, perhaps for a final season, but I think it’s best to revamp the night and aggressively counter program.

    Fridays, if Grimm stays here: Grimm at 9:00, paired with some similar shows mentioned above. Note: if this is the case, NBC should only premiere one show in the fall and promote the other during the Olympics and then premiere it.

    Fridays, if Chicago Fire moves here, like I would have it do: Chicago Fire at 9:00 and, if SVU isn’t cancelled, a final 13-18 episode season of that show, possibly paired with a new drama like After Hours at 8:00. Parenthood might work here, too. If not, a news program or, daringly, The Biggest Loser. And then, after The Olympics are over, NBC could premiere a new drama here.

    –at midseason:

    1. fill in the gaps where they exist, because of staggered releases, final seasons, shows that didn’t work, and so on.
    2. if the comedies on Mondays and Tuesdays are successful, expand further pare back The Voice and/or move it to Sundays, launching new shows where gaps exist.

    Note: the benefit to this plan, dependent on the new MJF show working, is that NBC could plan confidently, build in a foundation instead of trying to put out fires like it’s now doing.

    Oh yeah, as I said elsewhere, if NBC doesn’t do something like put The Biggest Loser on Fridays, it really should consider putting it on Saturdays. It could probably do well there, increasing the ad dollars, and it could always shift to another night quickly if/when NBC needs it.

  • Brian J

    Some points, before I get to one hypothetical schedule:

    1. I really, truly believe NBC is going to clean house. It ordered more comedy pilots than it usually does for next season, beyond what it would just to replace 30 Rock and The Office. It has a lot of holes to fill, true, but few if any of the shows really deserve another chance when it comes to the ratings.

    2. Syndication almost certainly matters more than it would in most cases, as all comedies are near each other and you could make a good case for canceling all of them. If it’s a choice between Parks and Community, I think Parks is a clear winner and would be renewed. It’s owned by NBC, it’s already been sold into syndication, and it already has more episodes than Community. It’s also the best reviewed comedy on NBC of any that might come back.

    3. NBC’s biggest worry, more than its failure to launch any successful shows midseason, is the possibility The Voice returns down in a big way. Obviously, up would be best, even if it were up a little, and for all I know, that might be what happens. But being down just a hair would be acceptable, too, as long as it’s still able to notch at least a 3.0. That means Revolution will be higher than it would otherwise be, which means NBC has at least one legitimate success story in the form of a drama for this season. Combined with Grimm from last season, that ain’t so bad.

    4. Of course, if NBC were smart, wouldn’t it schedule Hannibal for Tuesdays? Does NBC really think it’s a turkey? Even if it does, why not give viewers a chance to decide and for the show to have the best chance possible at success? If it were a ratings success, that’d be two successful dramas for this season, and NBC could be seen as making legitimate progress. I’d be astonished if Smash came back next season, so what’s the harm in moving it?

    5. I think NBC’s focus has to be on finding a legitimately successful scripted comedy for next season–one that can stand on its own. It has the new Michael J. Fox show, which was supposedly given promises about scheduling and marketing. Lots of people have suggested it should go on Thursdays, which makes sense, but I think it’d be better on another night, where there’s less competition. Fridays is too low profile, Wednesdays are possible but harder since ABC has two programs that are successful and very successful at 8:00 and 9:00 that are similar in tone and style. Mondays are possible but are better for another type of show (more on that in a moment). That leaves Tuesdays. I think this is the best night because there’s less competition than Thursdays and, right now, it’s only comedy competition is New Girl, which seems to be going after a different type of viewer and isn’t that lethal. It would also have The Voice as a possible lead-in, and while the show could probably stand on its own, this would give it a boost.

  • Lance B.

    which time slot is harder 8pm Wednesday? or 8pm Thursday?

  • Brian J

    This damn system is eating my comments, or thinks I am a spammer. Oh well, I’ll try to post my schedule and then the rest of my points:

    it’s hard to say what, if anything, NBC will order to series at this point, I’m basing this schedule off of what it has ordered to pilot already and what I think will help them across the board:

    –in the fall:

    MONDAY: The Voice until 9:30, followed by a new multi cam, followed by Revolution

    TUESDAY: The Voice until 9:00, followed by the MJF sitcom, followed by another single cam family show, followed by something like After Hours or I Am Victor

    WEDNESDAY, if Chicago Fire stays: Hatfields & McCoys/After Hours/Parenthood, then one of the aforementioned, followed by Chicago Fire

    WEDNESDAY, if Chicago Fire moves: Hatfields & McCoys/After Hours/Parenthood, followed by The Blacklist

    Thursday: Grimm at 9:00, surrounded by some combination of Believe, The Sixth Gun, and Bloodline, and/or Crossbones and Wonderland at midseason.

    Note: it’s possible that Parks and a niche show could go at 8:00 and 8:30, perhaps for a final season, but I think it’s best to revamp the night and aggressively counter program.

    Fridays, if Grimm stays here: Grimm at 9:00, paired with some similar shows mentioned above. Note: if this is the case, NBC should only premiere one show in the fall and promote the other during the Olympics and then premiere it.

    Fridays, if Chicago Fire moves here, like I would have it do: Chicago Fire at 9:00 and, if SVU isn’t cancelled, a final 13-18 episode season of that show, possibly paired with a new drama like After Hours at 8:00. Parenthood might work here, too. If not, a news program or, daringly, The Biggest Loser. And then, after The Olympics are over, NBC could premiere a new drama here.

    –at midseason:

    1. fill in the gaps where they exist, because of staggered releases, final seasons, shows that didn’t work, and so on.
    2. if the comedies on Mondays and Tuesdays are successful, expand further pare back The Voice and/or move it to Sundays, launching new shows where gaps exist.

    Note: the benefit to this plan, dependent on the new MJF show working, is that NBC could plan confidently, build in a foundation instead of trying to put out fires like it’s now doing.

  • steve

    If Smash gets renewed and The New Normal gets canceled there is something wrong with NBC.

  • Californiadgd

    Community, Go On and Whitney trust me I’m engenner

  • Zachary

    WHITNEY IS BASICALLY CANCELLED. Chris D’Elia has signed on for the lead in the NBC pilot Undateable. In addition, Tone Bell has signed on for a guest spot in the Fox pilot To My Assistant, with the option of becoming a regular (like Rex Lee with Suburgatory in 2011).

    This makes Go On and Community a lot more likely for a renewal. Go On will return following The Voice, presumably with numbers that can’t be beat (by NBC standards).

  • Brian J

    Grr, this system is definitely eating my comments, or it thinks I am a spammer. Oh well, I’ll try to sum up the rest of my points.

    Maybe it’s me, but NBC seems like it has a lot of interesting pilots for next season. If promoted correctly, I think many of them could become hits and it could see growth on every night. Overall, it needs a night which it can build around, not dependent on any reality. That’s why I think the Michael J. Fox show should go on Tuesdays, because if it’s huge (and it could be, like really, really huge) NBC might not need The Voice on that night in 2014-2015. With that in mind, I think it should stagger its release of new shows; give up on comedies on Thursdays at the moment, unless it plans to let Parks finish out its run and/or stick a new niche show there so it could work out its creative kinks before moving to a new night; and move Grimm, one of the few shows that works for it, to a new night, because it could grow and because it pairs well with many of the pilots NBC has ordered.

    A lot depends on these shows being good, and that’s a problem for any network, not just NBC. But if it could find some sort of success on Monday, Tuesday, and one other night of the week with scripted programming, it’d be back in a big way. I could see, say, I Am Victor being a dud on Tuesdays just as much as I could see it being a success, but if that’s the case, and, say, Hatfields & McCoys worked creatively, it could slide the show into that slot. Likewise, both shows surrounding Grimm on Thursdays in the fall (or one, if we go with just one) could fail, but NBC has a lot of shows (off the top of my head, right now: Bloodline, The Sixth Gun, Believe, The Blacklist, Wonderland, and Crossbones) that could go with it. Its showings on Monday this past fall indicate its core audience will follow it anywhere, and if NBC puts America’s Got Talent on after it on Thursdays in the summer, it would help the show grow its audience and bring viewers back to the night.

    I am also increasingly fond of the idea of putting The Biggest Loser on Saturdays. Scripted programming gets bigger ad dollars, all else equal, than unscripted programming, but NBC is only rerunning shows there at this point. Even if the show gets a 1.5, it’ll be far better than what NBC has been doing there. It might be able to do a 2.0 easily, which on almost every Saturday (when something like football isn’t on, that is) would let NBC win the night. This would probably increase their revenues and, if successful enough, allow the network to launch scripted programming at some point. And if doesn’t work, NBC could always move the show back to another night.

    If NBC doesn’t do this, by the way, The Biggest Loser could support a transported Chicago Fire and some other drama in the fall. NBC would surely win the night that way.

  • Ellen

    Bill — aren’t shows at 90% of the scripted average or above likely to be renewed? If so, wouldn’t that make Deception — NBC’s #2 10pm drama — likely to be renewed? (Yikes for NBC!)

  • Brian J

    I can see the case for renewing one show besides Parks, which will have 90 episodes after this season, but which one would it be?

    Whitney is owned by NBC, and perhaps it has improved more than I remember, but is it ever going to be a great comedy? If NBC really wants to be in business with Whitney Cummings, why not let her do another show?

    Community is at 84 episodes, but NBC doesn’t own the show. Sony is relentless for getting its shows to syndication, but it’s already got enough, unless other networks are sticklers for 88 episodes or more. It’s not doing any worse than most NBC shows, but it’s usually not doing any better. Why would NBC pick this show, which has supposedly been far weaker creatively, as opposed to picking a new show–or, if it comes down to this and Parks, pick it over Parks, which is still critically successful and which it owns?

    Go On is doing just as badly without The Voice as any other NBC show, despite Matthew Perry. It’s not a bad show, but can it ever be a great one? NBC does own this show, which certainly works in its favor, but unless NBC thinks it has promise to grow and/or its comedy development is really, horribly weak, why would it renew this show? Or if it does, why put it on in the fall? If it survives, my guess is that it will be held to midseason.

    And then there’s The New Normal. It’s not a bad show, and it’s trying it’s own style, which is important, but will this show really last for many seasons? NBC has ordered lots of pilots that could pair well with the new Michael J. Fox show, so why renew this one? NBC owns it, which works in its favor, but still.

    ALSO: what about Save Me? I assume that’s pretty much dead, given that NBC hasn’t tried to schedule it and it’s gone through one or two show runners already.

    Short of bringing back Parks and perhaps one or two other shows as safeties, I really think NBC will clean house. I can’t say I blame the network, if that’s the case.

  • Ellen

    Actually Deception is the #2 10 pm show overall, not just drama.

  • Kavyn

    I assume Community will get a 16 episode renewal so that it gets to the 100 episode mark, or a full season if they feel like it (although I doubt it, it seems like they’re setting seasons 4 and 5 as a semester each instead of a full year).

  • Brian J

    @Zachary:

    Is it me, or does it seem like a lot more shows than usual have had actors jumping ship? Ella Rae Peck and Tate Donovan have signed on for another NBC and CBS show. David Spade has signed on for an ABC show, as as Ken Jeong. Patrick Warburton signed on for another CBS show, and the Indian actor whose name I am too lazy to look up signed on for an NBC show.

  • Kavyn

    @Brian J it’s pretty obvious why. It’s a show that NBC knows works against Big Bang and American Idol, it has a very strong cult following (similar to Chuck in that sense), and it’s getting ratings that are currently at or above the average of their other shows.

    If Community was sub 1.0 I would probably agree with you. But a 1.9 premiere and last week’s 1.5 is pretty good for NBC at this point, especially on the most competitive time slot.

  • Ultima

    @CraveRecords
    NBC has so many holes!

    Not really, it just seems like that because their comedies are what is failing.

    Fall 2012 – 5 dramas (2 new), 5 hours of sitcoms (4 new), 3 hours of The Voice, 2 hours of newsmagazines, Saturday repeats, Sunday football

    Both of their fall dramas were hits and all three full season veteran dramas are doing fine (SVU is the weakest, but still better than their comedies). Subsequently, in order to have two more new dramas next fall, they have to cut two hours out of last fall’s lineup.

    The obvious solution is to cut their comedy hours from five to three, because they are failing across the board. I think they should go with only two renewals and stick them on Wednesday and not even for a full season; that way they can put four new comedies on Thursday, which will make promotion much easier than it was this past fall.

    Of course, they can also cancel Rock Center as well, but if they do so, I think it’s probably replaced by one of their straight-to-series dramas.

  • Brian J

    Oh yeah, I forgot to even mention 1600 Penn. The only way that show is renewed is if President Obama orders Greenblatt, et al to renew it. Otherwise, HA!

    Anyway, I get that relative comparisons in ratings can be just as important as absolute ones, but why does everyone assume Community’s ratings are really going to matter for NBC? It’s hard to be sure if anything will work, but while the network as a lot of holes to fill, it doesn’t have unlimited dollars nor unlimited space. Given that it needs to plan for the future, why not spend the money on a new show as opposed to one like Community which it doesn’t own and which already has enough episodes for syndication?

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