Late Night TV Ratings For March 11-15, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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March 21st, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON TOP THE ABC AND CBS TIME-PERIOD COMPETITION IN EVERY KEY CATEGORY FOR THE LATE-NIGHT WEEK OF MARCH 11-15

 

 

WITH SPECIAL APPEARANCES BY JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE, JIMMY FALLON GENERATES HIS BIGGEST NIGHTLY 18-49 AUDIENCE, EXCLUDING NIGHTS OF MAJOR PRIMETIME SPORTS, IN MORE THAN A YEAR

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — March 21, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” have finished #1 for the week of March 11-15 in every key ratings category versus their ABC and CBS time-period competition.

 

At 11:35 p.m. ET, “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” and ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” in total viewers as well as both men and women in the 18-49, 18-34 and 25-54 demos.

 

For the week, “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” averaged 3.4 million total viewers at 11:35 p.m., while “Late Show With David Letterman” averaged 2.9 million. “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” which was in rebroadcast, averaged 2.1 million. In the 18-49 demo, “The Tonight Show” averaged 0.7, topping the 0.6 of both “Late Show” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live.”

 

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Show" for the last 17 weeks in a row and topped "Kimmel" for eight of their 10 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered Letterman for 21 weeks in a row and all 10 weeks he and Kimmel have competed versus one another.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET, “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” averaged 1.7 million viewers for the week, which was 300,000 more than CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson.” ABC’s newsmagazine “Nightline” drew 1.3 million for its half-hour telecast. “Late Night With Jimmy Fallon,” which featured weeklong appearances from Justin Timberlake, also defeated “Late Late Show” in the 18-49 demo – 0.5 vs. 0.4 – while “Nightline” earned a 0.3.

 

Versus the same week last year, “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” was up 33 percent in adults 18-34 (to 283,000 viewers vs. 212,000) and up 30 percent in teens 12-17 (39,000 vs. 30,000).

 

Friday's "Late Night" generated Fallon’s biggest 18-49 audience (889,000) for any night of the week since Thanksgiving (when NBC Sports covered NFL football in primetime). Excluding nights of special primetime sports coverage, this was the biggest "Late Night" 18-49 audience in more than a year, since Friday, Feb. 3, 2012, during a week of special telecasts from Indianapolis leading up to the Super Bowl.

 

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Late Show" for 22 of the last 23 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 19 of the last 21 weeks. Versus "Nightline" in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC series for 10 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and six of the last seven weeks in total viewers.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of March 11-15. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.7 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/2 with encore telecasts

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.3/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 2.9 million viewers

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.1 million viewers with encore telecasts

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.3 million viewers

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.5 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

** Since January 8.

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 1

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.4 with encore telecasts

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.4 with encore telecasts

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.5

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.7

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 0.9 million with encore telecasts

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.7 million with encore telecasts

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.9 million

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.2 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.5 million

 

 

 

 
  • anonymous

    If NBC really is motivated by cost cutting, the future ratings projections for late night demand something cheap, maybe moving Carson Daly’s show to 12:35.

  • Gary Middleton

    Anonymous, that’s true. Or a genuinely cheap interview/Update style show with a Seth Meyers type: no band, tiny set, host salary under $2 million.

    I’ve also heard talk of a 90 minute Tonight Show, but I don’t buy that. Unless…could Tonight be cut back to 4 nights a week?

  • Gary Middleton

    “I really wonder when CBS is going to state something about this whole thing. I know the best thing for them to do is to keep their mouths shut, but I can’t help thinking they’ll jump on this by making an offer to Fallon.”

    There’s nothing to jump on. Jimmy Fallon will host the Tonight Show on NBC beginning next year.

  • Brad

    Gary, I’m impressed. I really can’t undermine you. I was told budget cost are typically doubled for advertisement and promotion, and the box office is half towards the movie, half towards the movie theater. I think Paul Rudd has two more movies until he’s told to take the back seat in upcoming movies. I just like Paul Rudd and thought I had a good argument with How Do You Know and a decent one with This Is 40. You are right, I accidentally reversed the budget and box office on WikiPedia. That was a really big bomb, but why the heck would you have a $120 million budget for a romantic comedy, especially one so simple as How Do You Know. Paul Rudd is skating on thin ice. Here’s to hoping Anchorman II works to Will Farrel’s and Paul Rudd’s benefit.

  • anonymous

    Conan may be the “canary in the coalmine” for talk shows. TBS seems to be happy with his show. It reportedly costs $40 million a year and regularly gets 0.4. Any deviation in cost upward or ratings downward could mean financial inviability.

  • Gary Middleton

    “That was a really big bomb, but why the heck would you have a $120 million budget for a romantic comedy”

    I wondered that too.

    FWIW, the last time I looked into this which was a long time ago, the studios would get 80% of the opening week gross. And then each successive week the percentage would shift in favor of the theater. Which might partly explain why the studios put so much emphasis on opening weekend.

  • Brad

    If the Tonight Show staff gets a lot bigger, with a lot more pre-made clips and what not to save energy for the live segments, and maybe more interviews and a couple performances for that night’s artist, it’s definitely possible. Honestly, I can see Fallon and his guest playing those hit games of his longer then the 3-4 minutes they do on Late Night. It goes by so quick and they are so much fun. My friend CJ and I love those games (we are 20).

    Gary, I’ll find that article explaining why Fallon should want to jump onto CBS. And no, it’s not simply because they are the most watched network in America.

  • Gary Middleton

    Anonymous, there was an article posted here awhile back which suggested a cable channel like TBS might have additional incentive to keep a show like Conan going. Apparently the amount they can charge the cable companies per subscriber, or something like that, can increase based on the quantity of original programming.

    An hour of Conan must cost a tiny fraction of what an hour of a scripted drama or sitcom would cost.

  • Brad

    Ah! That makes sense. Explains why theaters keep movies on their schedule for so long. I was given a very brief explanation. The movie theater business is really interesting. I’m glad I’ve moved on to Computer Science though, not that it pertains to anything here.

  • Aaron

    Will NBC announce anything about the Tonight Show at the May upfronts?

  • Brad

    Going off my quick math… $60 million budget, 42 weeks, 4 days a week, comes to $357,000 per episode.

    I’m getting on a google search reality shows for as little as $50-70,000 per elisode (lots of credit to the tiring effort of cideo editors), The Simpsons get $2 million per episode in 2007. Seinfield for $8 million, Fraiser for $8 million, and Will & Grace for $6-8 million when it come to the later episodes. Friends got the most with $11 million.

    In the end I think this answers it all…

    “A highly-rated TV sitcom–which means the actors are getting a huge amount of cash–adding the salaries of all concerned plus the sets and other fees, has a budget of about $1,000,000 per episode. An average sitcom would be somewhat less.”

    So, if you were a whatever cable station where time is typically filled up with reruns, would you rather take Conan for a weekly 2.0 rating with a $1.4 million, or would you risk it all on an original sitcom for one episode a week for $1 million or a little less. Isn’t that what TBS is doing with Cougar Town? Yes. They have a similar budget as Conan at $1.5 per episode/week and they bring in half the ratings that Conan does per week.

    *My analysis is only for new episodes. Not for reruns, online, or OnDemand.

  • Brad

    Another note. Cougar Town is seasonal. Conan is not.

  • Douglas in TN

    “Gary, Leno is NOT fired yet! NBC can still change their mind.

    I called the Tonight Show and they vehemently denied it!”

    You’re in our prayers, Neal…this transition must be hard on you.

    Best thing to do is just enjoy it!

    Actually, why don’t you check out Conan as you wait for the new Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon?

  • Doug

    Neal. I’m sorry if you soar about this. There is a chance Leno goes to Fox. All hope isn’t lose.

  • Nick

    I think the best and most obvious decision here would be to expand The Tonight Show to 90 minutes and let Leno and Fallon host together.

  • Brad

    Just Leno open up the show with a monologue and let Fallon do the rest. Then everybody wins.

  • anonymous

    People don’t like to focus on Leno’s strengths. His old age is used against him. The simple truth is, they would not think the same thing about a younger host who gets the same results.

    Compare him to the younger guys. When Conan gets a good Big Bang Theory lead-in, he does a respectable 0.6. Kimmel gets a tremendous ABC lead-in advantage, and season to date he gets 0.7. And here’s the “weak, old” Leno who beats them both with a season to date 0.8 coming off NBC’s bottom basement lead-ins.

    The most self-assured attack against Leno is that well, his ratings are slipping and eventually he’ll average 0.7 then 0.6 then 0.5.
    You could just as well argue that when Leno averages 0.7, Kimmel will go to 0.6. And when Leno averages 0.6, Kimmel will go to 0.5. They all fall together.

    Fallon is better than Conan and Kimmel at music and impressions, but other than that Conan and Kimmel are much more seasoned and polished hosts.

    Jon Stewart is the only one who has demonstrated he can beat Leno when given a good lead-in.

  • Brad

    I agree for the most part Anonymous but it really comes down to what’s profitable. It isn’t just about getting good ratings, its about getting a large audience but one with a young median. Fallon is capable of producing that. Leno truly is something to get the ratings he currently gets, but as Gary and others have noted, his 18-49 skews old rather then young. If I recall correctly his audience median is 53. It seems certain that 18-49 audience is going to go down more as Leno loses total viewers and his audience continues to age.

    Anonymous, if Leno is such a catch do you believe Fox will snatch him as soon as they can? I think they should especially when Leno wins in the breadbasket of the country, which Fox seems to attract, thus creating good ratings from Fox’s lead-ins. However, the lead-in and the late night show have an one hour news program in between.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Jon Stewart is the only one who has demonstrated he can beat Leno when given a good lead-in.”

    And even that is debatable given Stewart’s is a half hour show that ends at 11:30.

    But for the record, I think Dave and Jay’s demo erosion dramatically outpaced that of Kimmel over the past few years. As I like to say: Fallon might lose demo viewers, Leno is guaranteed to.

    Also worth wondering how much this has to do with viewer affluence. Is this like the “rural purge” of 1971? There’s an excellent Wikipedia page on it if anyone’s interested.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I think the best and most obvious decision here would be to expand The Tonight Show to 90 minutes and let Leno and Fallon host together.”

    Nick, I like the idea of Leno guest hosting Mondays. Let it end as it began. Fallon can use the time to work on his very involved show elements. Leno gets to remain a “guy on TV” to complement his road schedule. And Leno’s audience would be more likely to stay for the new Tonight.

    I know it will never happen, but I think it would work great for everyone. The snickers about NBC waiting to put Leno back in will subside as Jay dramatically ages.

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