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Cable News Ratings for Tuesday, March 26, 2013

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March 27th, 2013

 

Live + Same Day Cable News Daily Ratings for Tuesday, March 26, 2013

P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
Total Day
FNC        1,129        221         457
CNN           314         98         148
MSNBC           391        113         186
CNBC           159         43           99
FBN             56         13           26
HLN           437        158         258
Primetime P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC        2,008        342         716
CNN           485        163         255
MSNBC           776        255         369
CNBC           184         78         141
FBN             55         12           28
HLN           639        222         397
Net Morning programs (6-9 AM) P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC FOX & Friends        1,005        214         435
CNN Early Start/Starting Point           232        103         124
MSNBC Morning Joe           359        126         212
CNBC Squawk Box           109         29           52
HLN Morning Express w/ Meade           290        148         215
Net 5PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC FIVE, THE        1,979        303         700
CNN Situation Room           411        108         154
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS           729        105         272
CNBC FAST MONEY           196         32         128
HLN EVENING EXPRESS           697        201         357
Net 6PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC SPECIAL RPT W/BRET BAIER        1,642        241         587
CNN Situation Room           326         76         144
MSNBC POLITICS NATION           595        132         256
CNBC Mad Money           137         41         101
HLN EVENING EXPRESS           755        262         393
Net 7PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC The Fox Report W/S.SMITH        1,427        273         550
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT           388         90         195
MSNBC Hardball WITH C. MATTHEWS           568        146         276
CNBC Kudlow Report           124         18           62
HLN JANE VELEZ-MITCHELL           700        228         402
Net 8PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC THE OREILLY FACTOR        2,924        459       1,005
CNN Anderson Cooper 360           537        209         285
MSNBC NOW W/ ALEX WAGNER-PRIME           627        199         320
CNBC TREASURE DETECTIVES           113         21           71
HLN Nancy Grace           705        227         409
Net 9PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC Hannity        1,778        350         673
CNN PIERS MORGAN LIVE           523        164         286
MSNBC Rachel Maddow Show           922        322         438
CNBC TREASURE DETECTIVES           192         78         152
HLN Dr. Drew ON CALL           751        264         479
Net 10PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC ON THE RECORD W/GRETA 1,304 213 466
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 394 118 194
MSNBC Last Word W/ L. ODONNELL 779 243 348
CNBC CAR CHASERS, THE 246 134 200
HLN HLN AFTER DARK 459 173 302
Net 11PM P2+ (000s) 25-54 (000s) 35-64 (000s)
FNC THE OREILLY FACTOR        1,237        349         630
CNN ERIN BURNETT OUTFRONT           279        100         131
MSNBC NOW W/ ALEX WAGNER-PRIME           364        104         181
CNBC Mad Money             86         47           58
HLN SHOWBIZ TONIGHT           320        125         201

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For other days cable news ratings click here.

P2+ = viewers over the age of 2

(25-54) = Adults 25-54 viewing

(35-64) = Adults 35-64 viewing

Prime Time = 8-11pm

LIVE+SD: The number that watched a program either while it was broadcast OR watched via DVR on the same day [through 3AM the next day] the program was broadcast. For more information see Numbers 101.

Scratch = when a show's audience fails to meet minimum Nielsen reporting levels. For more information go here.

Nielsen Cable Network Coverage Estimates (as of July, 2012)

CNN/HLN: 99.727 million HHs

CNBC: 97.497 million HHs

FNC: 97.981 million HHs

MSNBC: 95.526 million HHs

Fox Business: 68.407 million HHs

Nielsen TV Ratings Data: ©2013 The Nielsen Company. All Rights Reserved.

 
  • AppleStinx

    Sicilian Papa wrote: “…I’m not saying I was desperate but if Vlad agreed to shave his back hair…we could talk.
    Another woman said my picture made me look like a killer.
    I don’t know about that…Vladimir thought I was kind a sexy.”

    I can definitely conclude from the triangulation above, that Vladmir was the desperate one. :grin:

  • Ralph Hahn

    @Chriscee: >>> Fake Ralph = Jeff, Mark or USA…..which one should we lay odds on??

    <<< I've given the mods all three names + one more. I'm putting money on Mark2. His doucheness comes out with yet another STUPID A*S statement about Rachel beating The Five in the demo! The Five is NOT aired in prime-time, when everyone is watching TV. Rachel airs at 9PM. Potential viewers for The Five are probably not home for work yet. THis ass-clown must had done a LOT of drugs at one time.

    @Sicilian Papa: How is my friend? You had me in stitches before about the Russian lady. Just stay out of Brighton Beach if you are in the NYC area. LOL

  • Sicilian Papa

    @

    Apple

    You are the King my friend!

  • Sicilian Papa

    @

    Ralph

    The fake Ralph can’t hold a candle to you!

  • Bsotgnw

    Mark2

    Are you stupid or kidding compairing the 5 to mad cow

  • Ralph Hahn

    @Papa: Thank you, my friend.

    I wholeheartedly agree with you that AppleStinx IS The King here.

  • Mark2

    @Ralphie Girl “I’ve given the mods all three names + one more. I’m putting money on Mark2.”

    Well, I guess you’ll be losing some money. And I expect an apology once they find out who your sock puppet is.

  • http://tvbythenumbers.com Bill Gorman

    @Ralph Hahn, I had blocked a “fake” Ralph Hahn before, but he has reappeared and we don’t have the time to continue blocking folks that are determined to evade it. I suggest you follow the instructions above the comment box and create a gravatar if you want to appear different from fakes.

    As for the “who was it”? No obvious current commenter.

  • Bsotgnw

    Bill

    realy, I thought that was your purpose?

  • Mark2

    @Bsotgnw “realy, I thought that was your purpose?”

    Didn’t you read what he said you knucklehead?

    –“As for the “who was it”? No obvious current commenter”

  • Jeff

    OOOPS Ralph and Chriscee wrong again. Must be a rare brain disease…….can only explain such contempt and stupidity.

  • Jeff

    He just says the funniest things!! :lol:

    Limbaugh: Bill O’Reilly And Megyn Kelly “Marginalized” Fox Viewers Who Oppose Marriage Equality As “Bible Thumpers”

  • Jeff

    As I said before…..GREED!

    Some of the nation’s largest health insurance companies are warning investors that they’ll raise insurance premiums by as much as 116 percent next year, as the coverage expansion provisions in the Affordable Care Act go into effect and millions of uninsured Americans begin purchasing coverage.
    The threats of premium increases come as the industry is experiencing record profits and are part of a well-coordinated publicity campaign to alarm Americans about the cost of coverage, while downplaying mechanisms in the law that will cushion them from rate shock. The effort comes as insurers seek more favorable regulatory changes that would, in part, allow companies to charge older people more for coverage.
    United Health Group Inc., Aetna, and Blue Cross and Blue Shield are ringing the alarm, attributing the possible cost increases to general health care inflation as well as provisions in the health care law, which require insurers to offer more comprehensive coverage, particularly in the individual health care market, and limit the companies’ ability to set premiums based on beneficiaries’ health care histories, age, or sex.
    As a result, “The insurance industry has also been talking publicly about big potential premium increases in lobbying for tweaks to the law,” the Wall Street Journal reports:
    In a private presentation to brokers late last month, UnitedHealth Group Inc., the nation’s largest carrier, said premiums for some consumers buying their own plans could go up as much as 116%, and small-business rates as much as 25% to 50%. The company said the estimates were driven in part by growing medical costs not directly tied to the law. It also cited the law’s requirements that health status not affect rates and that plans include certain minimum benefits and limits to out-of-pocket charges, among other things. [...]
    Aetna Inc. in a presentation last fall to its national broker advisory council, suggested rates on individual plans not being grandfathered under the law could go up 55%, on average, and gave a figure of 29% for small business rates. Both numbers included 10 percentage points tied to medical-cost inflation, not the law. An Aetna spokesman said the numbers are “still generally in line with what we’ve been estimating,” and represented the average impact in a typical state.
    An official with Blue Cross & Blue Shield of North Carolina told a gathering of brokers last week that individual premiums could go up by as much as 40% to 50%, according to brokers who were present. A spokeswoman for the insurer said “we don’t have final numbers” yet on premiums.
    Insurers have long complained that the law’s more rigorous standards would raise prices, although since the Affordable Care Act was signed into law, national health expenditures have decreased and insurers in the individual market have followed the trend, posting fewer double digit increases. Sudden rate hikes were considered the norm before the law went into effect and applicants were regularly denied coverage or priced out of it altogether. Insurance commissioners have also begun reviewing rates more carefully and insurers have had to spend 80 cents out of every premium dollar on health benefits, rather than administrative overhead.
    The ACA also includes mechanisms to help minimize initial sticker shock and independent analyses have found that many young adults can enroll in Medicaid, stay on their parents’ policies, or qualify for tax credits in the state-based health insurance exchanges. The CBO analysis of the law has also determined that average premiums for individuals would be 10 percent to 13 percent higher because of the law — an increase that’s far smaller than insurers are projecting.
    Insurers, meanwhile, are already seeing impressive profits. UnitedHealth, for instance, “had a particularly strong past year, with net income of $5.1 billion, up by 11% from the previous year” and Aetna is similarly beating revenue expectations. A July 2010 report from PricewaterhouseCoopers concluded that the law’s state-based health care exchanges provide private insurers with a lucrative new market in which they stand to gain up to $200 billion in revenue by 2019.

  • Hillbilly

    @Ratboy

    I read your boys on Duck Dynasty are in a dispute over their pay for the next season of the show. I think they (3 of them) want $200,000 an episode. It’s the number 1 show on cable the night it airs & second over all on cable to The Walking Dead.

  • Hillbilly

    The filter eating my post.

  • Hillbilly

    Coffee Steve -*Feds Fund $880,000 to Study Benefits of Snail Sex

    TZCA could have told them all about it for free. :lol:

    He has sex as often as a snail travels 5 miles a day.

  • Hillbilly

    The part about the banks won’t go through. :???: Oh well.

  • Hillbilly

    Bill O’s 11pm numbers beating MSNBC & CNN’S primetime numbers on a regular basis. :)

    I don’t watch much of his show, but he must be doing something right. I did catch Charles Krauthammer talking about the banking deal in Cyprus. Bill O was kinda confused, but wouldn’t let Charles help him out.

  • Hillbilly

    The Miami Heat finally lost. Now they can play the Spurs with less pressure on them. That should be a good game.

  • Hillbilly

    Derek
    Posted March 27, 2013 at 1:32 PM
    Does anyone think that The Five would do even better in prime time? Say the post-O’Reilly slot? Or would it keep the same viewer/demo totals (or drop)?

    ——————–

    Good question. At 5pm lots of folks either at work or commuting home. My guess they would do better at 6 or 7pm, than at 9pm. They started running repeats on the weekends. That ain’t helping the weekend ratings.

    C’ya

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