Late Night TV Ratings For March 18-22, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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March 28th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON TOP THE ABC AND CBS TIME-PERIOD COMPETITION FOR THE LATE-NIGHT WEEK OF MARCH 18-22
LENO HITS SEVEN-WEEK HIGH IN TOTAL VIEWERS AND FOUR-WEEK BEST IN 18-49 VIEWERS OVER DAVID LETTERMAN, WHILE FALLON CONTINUES DOMINANCE OVER ‘Nightline’ AND CRAIG FERGUSON
UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — March 28, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” were #1 for the week of March 18-22 in 18-49 viewers, total viewers and other key categories versus their ABC and CBS time-period competition.

At 11:35 p.m. ET, “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” hit a seven-week high in total viewers with 3.522 million (best since Jan. 28-Feb. 1) and a four-week high in the 18-49 demo with 982,000 viewers (best since Feb. 18-22). That was better than ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” last week and CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” from Monday through Wednesday. CBS aired NCAA Basketball tournament coverage on Thursday and Friday, and those numbers are not reflected here.

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than “Late Show” for the last 18 weeks in a row and topped “Jimmy Kimmel Live” for nine of their 11 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered “Late Show” for 22 weeks in a row and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” for 11 of 11 weeks.

At 12:35 a.m. ET, “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” defeated ABC’s “Nightline” in the head-to-head half-hour in every key ratings category: adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” for 23 of the last 24 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 20 of the last 22 weeks. Versus ABC’s “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the newsmagazine for 11 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and seven of the last eight weeks in total viewers.

WEEKLY AVERAGES

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of March 18-22. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3*

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2*

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.5 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers*

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.4 million viewers

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers *

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.8 million viewers*

* Thursday and Friday CBS programming was delayed by basketball and is excluded from these averages. Monday’s “Last Call” and Friday’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” were encores.

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.5 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

** Since January 8.

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF MARCH 18-MARCH 22

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.4 with encore telecasts

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.3 with encore telecasts

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.3 with encore telecasts***

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 0.8 million with encore telecasts

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6 million with encore telecasts

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.7 million with encore telecasts***

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

*** Thursday’s “Conan” was delayed by NCAA Basketball and is excluded from these averages.

 

 

 
  • This Guy

    Lastly, I don’t know what’s “cowardly” of Leno to hide in the closet and listen in on the execs trying to screw him (and Letterman) over for their own gain. If he’d been invited to the actual meeting, you’d better believe he’d have been there. Instead, that meeting was held in secret and both parties were misled as to what it was even going to be about.

    Frankly, in the comedy world, that’s one of the things Leno is most respected for! Sticking it to “The Suits” and playing their own game against them.

    If you think that’s “cowardly”, you obviously know nothing about how show business works. It’s an industry that thrives upon duplicity.

  • Gary Middleton

    TG, I can explain the “cowardly” thing.

    Hiding in a closet to avoid confrontation may, in some circumstances, be cowardly. Hiding in a closet for espionage, whatever one may think of espionage, is not cowardly.

    Dave cleverly and successfully conflated the 2 concepts in several of his anti-Leno rants. So now the Douglases of the world parrot that when they’re short on ideas, which is always.

    If an undercover cop or CIA spy hides in a closet to gather information in a drama, people don’t think “That coward!”

  • Gary Middleton

    TG, according to some writing Cavett did this weekend, Carson was also a critically-savaged pick to take over Tonight. Merv had a very successful stint guest hosting before Johnny took over, and as Carson came out of the gate awkward and stilted, the critics piled on.

  • This Guy

    Hm. Posted two nice posts and neither went through.

  • Gary Middleton

    And, TG, writer Mark Evanier made the point that the critics were still on Johnny’s case a decade into it with the same line of attack they take on Leno.

    “I remember a time when Cavett, over on ABC in a competing time slot, was the witty, urbane guy preferred by critics and Carson was a hayseed from Nebraska whose only skill was nudging starlet guests into saying naughty things and then he’d make a face to the camera and/or utter some cheap double-entendre. Once upon a time, his ratings victories over Cavett were prima facie evidence to some that America was a nation of dolts.”

  • This Guy

    I agree, Gary.

    I don’t get any of the hate lobbed at Leno (or any of the hosts, really).

    First of all, showbiz is nasty. To think Leno is some villain he’s not is laughable. The hosts are the last people involved in these disputes, not the first.

    And, as I’ve said numerous times, I find all of the hosts funny. Every one of them. I don’t know when we all decided we have to take sides like it’s The Hunger Games. I tend to laugh at all of them. Just like I do many, many comedians I see live.

  • Douglas in TN

    I guess Gary would rather us bow to his perceived intellectual superiority…

  • This Guy

    Again, why the hostility?

    You don’t like Leno. Fine. I don’t care. But I’m not going to insult you for it. What’s the point?

    When did we take something as subjective as comedy and turn it into a reason to insult people who don’t share the same tastes?

  • Gary Middleton

    “When did we take something as subjective as comedy and turn it into a reason to insult people who don’t share the same tastes?”

    See the Cavett/Carson point above. It’s been a thing humans do for a long, long time.

  • Douglas in TN

    I’m indifferent to Leno for the most part. I was a huge fan, as I’ve written hundreds of times, of Leno in the 70s and 80s, and lost respect for him in the mid 1990s when he went into OJ land. Heck, I’m one of the few who thinks his first NBC shows were light years better than anything post Hugh Grant.

    I think Leno was Machiavellian in inserting himself with the Jay Leno Show, knowing it would bomb. He knew it would tank…most of us did.

    So, yes, I’m glad to see him going and Fallon coming back. I think that show, and the whole format, needs a refreshing. I’m old enough to remember a Johnny Carson with black hair, when the show was more free flowing than it would be later…silly and fun. Leno was never like that, but I think Fallon would be.

    If you read carefully, I write nothing “hateful” about Leno…nothing worse than any critic would write.

    I poke fun at some of the fanboish sock puppets…and that is fun.

    So your preaching is misdirected and sort of strange.

  • Douglas in TN

    And now, This Guy, you need to turn your binoculars to the Neals/ Marios and the other ones who smash Conan (and Conan fans) harder than anybody else does on Leno.

  • This Guy

    I hav done so plenty of times.

    Fallon is good…but it’s still just a talk show. Nothing hugely groundbreaking. And no telling if he will be any more popular than Conan was in the same slot.

    I think it is a myth that younger hosts automatically draw younger viewers. But we shall see.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Nothing hugely groundbreaking.”

    That has been the secret to success at Tonight for 51 years.

  • Gary Middleton

    The most successful batteries in the history of late night were point/counterpoint type scenarios. Johnny shows you what a conventional talk show looks like, then Dave comes on and deconstructs it. Jay shows you what conventional comedy looks like, then Conan comes on and deconstructs it. In some ways, it’s the Stewart/Colbert combination too.

    You try to put the counterpoint into the point’s slot and it doesn’t fit quite right.

    I think Fallon can be the point man, and then if they want some ironic soil-turner he or she can probably do well after Fallon.

  • GARebelman

    *Sigh* every time I post a link it gets caught and has to “await moderation”. Must be a new feature of sorts.

  • Gary Middleton

    GAR, Bill let us know awhile ago that the site no longer accepts links. It’s a spam magnet.

  • Nick

    @Gary: “Talk shows tend to start big and then the audience shrinks through the hour. So Leno’s 1.4 might have only been a .8 at 10:59 pm, while Smash’s 1.0 might be 1.0 at 10:59 pm.”

    Huh? This isn’t even true in the slightest. Every drama (and show) at 10pm decreases at the half hour. On Monday, for example, Revolution went from a 2.9 to a 2.4 or something like that. Most shows generally drop in the vicinity of 0.2, which I believe is what Leno was dropping regularly. Not to mention, averaging a 1.4 and going as low as .8 is absurd.

    I’m a fan of Jay – I’ve been watching him for what seems like forever. However, I also watch Fallon and would not mind seeing him as host of TTS (it’s certainly a smart choice). But Leno is certainly getting the short end of the stick. Howard Stern a few weeks ago said something about this issue that really rings true. Leno has given NBC a #1 show for almost 20 years, but the execs seem to hate him. They fired him once when he was #1, took away his show, and he came back and is still #1. Continues to be #1 and they want to fire him again. I’ve never seen anything like it. Go fix the rest of your damn lineup first and then worry about this. When you’re 10pm lineup can average a 2.0, then worry about this. I’m sure Leno would love to keep hosting, and I’m sure Fallon is fine staying at Late Night. Why can’t they just keep their hands out of it? Doesn’t it really stem from a strong dislike for Jay Leno?

  • Gary Middleton

    “Huh? This isn’t even true in the slightest. Every drama (and show) at 10pm decreases at the half hour. On Monday, for example, Revolution went from a 2.9 to a 2.4 or something like that. Most shows generally drop in the vicinity of 0.2, which I believe is what Leno was dropping regularly. Not to mention, averaging a 1.4 and going as low as .8 is absurd.”

    The issue isn’t what Leno did in the 2nd half hour. The issue is what was it doing at 10:59 right before the news started. This was a massive problem for the affiliates, to the extent that they got involved in the programming of the show.

    Not that it was my point, but could Leno have done a 0.8 in the final minute of his broadcast? Absolutely. There’s a reason just about every show in prime time, even Dateline, has a story arc.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Doesn’t it really stem from a strong dislike for Jay Leno?”

    Probably. But there might also be economics bearing down, particularly at 12:30. Maybe a show like Jimmy Fallon’s is verging on red ink with the current 12:30 audience pool so shrunken.

    They also have additional data we don’t see. For example, similar to my point above, maybe Jay doesn’t deliver a lot of viewers right at 12:35 and they have evidence that Jimmy generates a lot of his own. They may also find that Jimmy’s audience is more urban and that advertisers will pay more for that, which is what triggered the legendary CBS “rural purge” of 1971. And of course they probably have specific data on just how many of Jay’s viewers will exit the demo in the next couple of years.

  • Brad

    ““Nothing hugely groundbreaking.”

    That has been the secret to success at Tonight for 51 years.”

    Exactly. This is why Fallon is the perfect man for the Tonight Show. He’s the traditional late night host. No one about Leno is the traditional late night host. Everyone else has to be alternative. There is a market for traditional late night and that is exactly why Leno and Fallon win the week at NBC.

    As to why mess with the Leno/Fallon pairing. TAK: Taxes, Audience, Kimmel.

    Everyone loves a small budget. Fallon and his crew may be a bit cheaper then Leno and his crew, but a Tonight Show in New York would be the key to it all due to tax breaks.

    It is all about the audience and the demographics. NBC believes the 38 year old host can gather a nice following of 18-49, along with 18-34 year olds. The problem is that Kimmel is already at 11:35 and is starting to win the 18-34 years. As Bill Carter explained it, NBC is concern that if they leave Fallon on the back-burner, give him two or three years, Kimmel will get franchised. He’ll lock up his own audience for the time period.

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