Late Night TV Ratings For April 1-5, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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April 11th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

 

‘THE Tonight Show,’ ‘LATE NIGHT’ DEFEAT ABC AND CBS TIME-PERIOD COMPETITION IN TOTAL VIEWERS, KEY DEMOS FOR WEEK OF APRIL 1-5
LENO HITS NINE-WEEK HIGH IN 18-49 AND TOTAL VIEWERS WHILE FALLON REACHES 13-WEEK BEST IN 18-49

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — April 11, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” topped their ABC and CBS time-period competition for the week of April 1-5 in the 18-49 demo, total viewers and other key categories.

Leno had his best week in 18-49 viewers and total viewers in nine weeks while Fallon hit a 13-week high in 18-49 viewers.

For the week, Leno delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” in every key ratings category — adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers. Fallon was the winner in every key measure against ABC’s “Nightline” during their head-to-head half-hour and versus CBS’s encore “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson.”

For the week, it was Leno’s biggest 18-49 audience (1.021 million) and biggest overall viewership (3.610 million) since the week of Jan. 28-Feb. 1. Fallon generated his biggest 18-49 audience (693,000) since New Year’s week (Dec. 31, 2012-Jan. 4, 2013) and biggest overall audience (1.797 million) since Jan. 28-Feb. 1.

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than “Late Show” for the last 20 weeks in a row and topped “Kimmel” for 11 of their 13 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered “Late Show” for 24 weeks in a row and for all 13 weeks since Kimmel moved to 11:35 p.m.

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than “Late Late Show” for 25 of the last 26 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 22 of the last 24 weeks. Versus ABC’s newsmagazine “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC series for 13 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and nine of the last 10 weeks in total viewers.

The week included Leno’s biggest Monday overall audience in 15 weeks and biggest Wednesday viewership in nine weeks. The Monday show averaged 3.8 million viewers overall (best since Dec. 17, 3.9 million) while Wednesday’s episode averaged 3.8 million, his best since Jan. 30 (3.9 million).

With 1.8 million viewers overall, Fallon delivered his biggest Monday overall audience in nine weeks (Jan. 28, 1.9 million). With 2.0 million viewers tuning in Wednesday, it was his biggest for that night of the week since Sept. 5, 2012 (2.1 million viewers).

Leno and Fallon performed a duet at the start of the Monday “Late Night” and Wednesday’s “Tonight” and “Late Night” telecasts followed NBC’s announcement that Fallon would succeed Leno as host of “Tonight” in the spring of 2014.

WEEKLY AVERAGES

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of April 1-5. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show” 0.4/2*

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 2.9 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.5 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.5 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.8 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.3 million viewers*

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

* “Late Late Show” was in encores for the week. “Kimmel” was an encore on Friday.

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

** Since January 8.

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF APRIL 1-5

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.7

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.5

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.7

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.6 million

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 1.0 million

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.2 million

Adult Swim 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET 1.5 million

 

 

 

 

 
  • Drum

    I’m not only talking about Ferguson, i just gave him praise for his opening, and i don’t think that all hosts should make speeches like his.

    I’m saying that there’s an obligation to at least give sympathy on air to those affected and seeing that all of the hosts that were “live” yesterday addressed it, i doubt that Leno/Fallon/Letterman would be any different.

  • Brad

    “The biggest audience in late night Monday went to a rerun where the bombing was not going to be mentioned. And it’s not hard to come up with why that might be. They heard Wolf Blitzer’s views on it for 2 hours. They heard Brian Williams’ views on it for an hour. They heard their local news viewpoints on it for half an hour. Did they really want or need Jay Leno’s take at that point?”

    Gary, that’s what I thought about during the Aurora Shooting. I enjoy what they have to say, but in all honesty Leno is right in saying “I’m sorry, but the show must go on” after it had been covered for hours on end before the show even airs.

    However, Ferguson does act the best during these events. I watched him last night and he was terrific. He’s a pro when he needs to be.

  • Gary Middleton

    Brad, Craig did what was right for Craig. But Dave opened up a bit of a can of worms with that 9/11 speech after which late night comedians were in danger of believing they are national preachers or healers.

    There’s a serious risk that these addresses-from-the-pulpit could come off as grandstanding. Ferguson’s show released a transcript prior to his address, effectively a promo. I don’t know the wisdom of that.

    Jack Paar likely would’ve given an emotional gusher, Carson would have plowed ahead with the show. No one right answer.

  • Gary Middleton

    btw, this debate played out in a very real way in 1986 when the Challenger blew up. Guest host Joan Rivers wanted to alter the Tonight Show episode significantly. She said the actions of the Carson team contributed to her decision to leave for Fox:

    “My judgment was never trusted. The worst was when Challenger exploded. I was devastated and told the Carson producers I could not do the monologue that night. They insisted, saying, “That is our format.” I flatly refused. That was a big turning point for me. I decided I had to find a place in the sun where I could follow my instincts, where I did not have to explain to people why it was inappropriate to do jokes when America is grieving.”

  • Brad

    Very nice find there Gary.

  • Brad

    Just a fun fact. I go to Ulitmate-Guitar dot com almost daily and when they post clips, or steal articles with referenced clips, it is of JKL. Sometimes we see a Letterman clip if it is of the Foo Fighters but that’s about all. Kimmel really serves the rock community well and I think his videos get spread along quite nicely for music.

  • Douglas in TN

    Letterman opened a can or worms, perhaps, but it was a can that needed to be opened. What he did may have been unprecedented, but the event that caused it was unprecedented.

    Carson’s era included multiple tragic assassinations, violent wars, space-related disasters…but those happened in Dallas, Memphis, overseas, Florida…not blocks from where Tonight was taped.

    The twin towers were destroyed, and thousands killed, in Letterman’s backyard. A city he loves and mocks at the same time…a city he reveres. It had to be addressed, and he did it pitch perfectly. And, yes, in the meantime, he again changed the format of that type show a bit.

  • Brad

    “He did it pitch perfectly. And, yes, in the meantime, he again changed the format of that type show a bit.”

    That sums up his entire late night career. How he’s done so many things so magnificently that it changes the norm of late night television. The biggest being that practically every show now but Fallon and Leno is entirely self-deprecating humor. That all started with Letterman’s Late Night.

  • Douglas in TN

    And Letterman won an Emmy for that episode…although there was no way it wasn’t going to win, considering the times and subject matter. I, personally, would have felt guilty submitting that episode for consideration, but that’s show biz.

  • Gary Middleton

    “The biggest being that practically every show now but Fallon and Leno is entirely self-deprecating humor. That all started with Letterman’s Late Night.”

    Like most things ‘Letterman’, it started with Steve Allen.

    But not the desk speeches. Those are pure Dave, imo. Douglas is right, the 9/11 one was extremely circumstantial. The ones since then, including the 9/11 speeches done by all the other hosts after Dave, are increasingly questionable from my perspective.

    btw, you had the Reagan assassination attempt in 1981 and then I’m not sure there was another “national tragedy” until Challenger in 1986, and I’m not sure there was another until the LA riots in 1992 and then Oklahoma in 1995. Now we have one every 3 months. I don’t know if we have more horrific acts now or if the 24 hour cable news/social media infrastructure is elevating more things to ‘national tragedy’, but the rush for everyone to make their heartbreak be heard can devolve into triteness.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Carson’s era included multiple tragic assassinations, violent wars, space-related disasters…but those happened in Dallas, Memphis, overseas, Florida…not blocks from where Tonight was taped.”

    The LA riots came close enough to Johnny’s doorstep that he had to cancel 2 shows for safety. Much of that city burned to the ground. The death toll was certainly much higher than Boston. It spoke to a very critical national issue. But Johnny left the speechifying to Arsenio. Different strokes.

    btw, Robert Klein has spoken wistfully of how that wiped out his final Tonight appearance.

  • Ann

    @Gary

    I agree about Steve Allen. I’m not old enough to remember him on TTS, but I did watch his syndicated show. I’ve always thought he was much funnier than Carson. Letterman was strongly influenced by Allen. His zany bits are definitely a reflection of what Allen used to do.

  • Brad

    Seems legit…

    What might Jimmy Fallon’s ‘Tonight Show’ be like?

    dailylocal dot com/article/20130415/ENTERTAINMENT01/130419727/what-might-jimmy-fallon-s-tonight-show-be-like-#full_story

  • Brad

    From a different article…

    “Fallon’s promotion leaves an empty seat on “Late Night,” and in the past few months, two names have been floating around as possible replacements: Seth Meyers and Alec Baldwin. Both actors would make sense, as they have strong ties to Lorne Michaels, the executive producer of “Late Night” and creator of “Saturday Night Live,” where Meyers has served as head writer since 2006. He was also an executive producer on “30 Rock,” where Baldwin spent seven seasons playing the role of Jack Donaghy.”

    If I was celebrity I wouldn’t want to go onto a show with Alec Baldwin. He is too dry, known for his hot headed personality, and he can easily be taken as sarcastic. Seth Meyers would be more willing to listen or at least appear that way. His youthfulness will also be something that shines on the show. Baldwin would be nothing more then dry monologues and interviews. Just my thoughts.

  • Diana Santiago

    Alec Baldwin has been doing interviews to celebrities since October 2011 in his podcast, so he has the interviewing skills.

    From a recent interview to Lorne Michaels:

    Though Michaels is no longer involved with Conan O’Brien’s late night act, more airtime was devoted to the TBS host. He used the former Late Night host –and short-lived Tonight Show host—as an example of someone with the three ingredients he looks for in talent. The first is something that Michaels can’t quite put his finger on, though he acknowledges that it is some combination of being able to make him laugh and come at comedy from a different direction; the second is discipline and the ability to be both devoted and serious about the craft; and the third and final one is luck. “With Conan, I knew he’s not going to sleep until he figures it out,” said Michaels.

  • Gary Middleton

    Anything earlier than 1:30 a.m. for Alec Baldwin would be a calculated decision to alienate a lot of people politically. I’m not one who puts much emphasis on that stuff. The accusations about Dave being too liberal and all that strike me as silly. But let’s face it, Baldwin is vigorously, far-left political.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Letterman was strongly influenced by Allen. His zany bits are definitely a reflection of what Allen used to do.”

    Yes, the zany bits were often flat-out lifted from Allen. And Dave to his credit acknowledged that.

    But the more I watch Allen, the clearer it is that Dave’s whole use of language is something of an Allen knock-off. “This movie is sweeping the country, and boy does it need sweeping”. “Playing in selected cities, and pray your city is selected.” These are all Allen-isms. It still takes a ton of talent to do that, you can’t knock off Steve Allen without a terrific quickness and vocabulary. Dave made it his own with superior broadcasting skills, and later would bring some other things to the equation in terms of confrontation and those ad-libbed essays from the desk.

  • Drum

    When Aurora shooting happened, Ferguson already taped a monologue on Thursday to air on Friday and that monologue contained a lot of jokes about The Dark Knight Rises which was expected to be one of the biggest movies of the year. So he came in on Friday with a skeleton crew, no audience and taped an explanation why the monologue will feel different, and he shared his sympathies to those involved.

    On Monday they had a show scheduled to go on 4 hours after the bombs exploded. No one knew if that would be the only attack, and we still don’t know who did it. So instead of pretending that nothing happened he taped another 5 minute opening to explain his opinion on the subject. After that it was a normal show, with a switch of the second guest Brad Goreski with Larry King.

    How is that behavior grandstanding, where did he exaggerate?

    And i’m sure a 3.0 lead-in for Leno had nothing to do with his victory (1.0 over Kimmel’s 0.9 for “live” performance with 2.1 lead-in) on Monday.

  • Gary Middleton

    “How is that behavior grandstanding, where did he exaggerate?”

    Eye of the beholder, Drum. When you make a big show on the back of a national tragedy, some may perceive it as moving. Some may perceive it as real and natural. And some may perceive it as grandstanding.

    Releasing an early transcript, effectively a promo, says he wasn’t just trying to allay his viewers. He was trying to gain viewers.

    “And i’m sure a 3.0 lead-in for Leno had nothing to do with his victory (1.0 over Kimmel’s 0.9 for “live” performance with 2.1 lead-in) on Monday.”

    It had plenty to do with it, and as Diana implied, it’s possible that the number could be substantially adjusted. If, for example, NBC got the upper hand in coverage and then the Boston NBC affiliate pre-empted Jay.

    btw, as JC has documented with striking accuracy, Kimmel’s “.9s” tend to be .75s.

  • Douglas in TN

    Right about Baldwin. He’s on the rather loony left side, and certainly not mainstream. And he often has the personality of a stop sign.

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