Late Night TV Ratings For April 8-12, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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April 18th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

LENO, FALLON CONTINUE TO TOP THE LATE-NIGHT COMPETITION DURING THE WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

 

Tonight Show’ Delivers Biggest 18-49 Audience in 10 Weeks While ‘Late Night’ Beats Ferguson, ‘Nightline’ in All Key Ratings Categories

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — April 18, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” delivered its biggest 18-49 demo audience in 10 weeks as it defeated “Late Show with David Letterman” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” in 18-49 viewers and total viewers for the week of April 8-12.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET, NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and ABC’s “Nightline” during their head-to-head half-hour in every key ratings category. Note that CBS's Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded from the weekly averages due to delays for sports coverage, while Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Leno bested Kimmel in all key ratings categories — adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers. And while “Tonight” and “Late Show” both rounded to a 0.8 rating in 18-49, Jay delivered the bigger audience in that key demo, 1.047 million to 974,000. That 1.047 million viewers was Jay’s biggest 18-49 audience since the week of Jan. 28-Feb. 1.

 

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than Letterman for the last 21 weeks in a row and topped Kimmel for 12 of their 14 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered Letterman for 25 weeks in a row and Kimmel for 14 of 14 weeks.

 

Versus the same week last year, Fallon was up 10 percent in adults 18-49 (to 668,000 from the year-ago 610,000), up 21 percent in adults 18-34 (289,000 vs. 238,000) and up 3 percent in total viewers (1.658 million vs. 1.609 million). Season to date, Fallon is up 7 percent in viewers 18-34 (297,000 vs. 278,000).

 

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than Ferguson for 26 of the last 27 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 23 of the last 25 weeks. Versus “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC newsmagazine series for 14 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 10 of the last 11 weeks in total viewers.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of April 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.8/3*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/3*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.3 million viewers*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.4 million viewers with encore telecasts*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.4 million viewers

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers*

 

* CBS’s Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded due to delays for sports coverage. Friday’s “Last Call” and “Kimmel” were encores.

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

** Since January 8.

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.7

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.5 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.8 million

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  • Brad

    It’s only predictable after the fact. Anyone could easily see the connection. However his wit in making fun at NBC is pure gold. Can’t wait to see jaywalking tomorrow online.

  • Gary Middleton

    Kevin was the perfect antidote to Branford Marsalis, who grimaced through his stint as Leno bandleader. It was like a liberation. Kevin was having a great time and it made Jay had a great time, which made us have a great time. And never more obvious than the night everyone tuned in to see Hugh Grant. And wow could you see it again that Friday night in 2013 when Kevin returned as a guest.

    I also think he was anything but slow on the uptake. Clearly Jay has a philosophy to always keep moving forward, no matter what, and it has served him great. But Kevin was able to bring reality to it as audience surrogate, with his flawless timing in calling Jay on huge lapses in logic or pronunciation. Jay doesn’t like to go off-script, even though he’s good at it. Kevin forced him there.

    What a great era that was.

  • Gary Middleton

    Just to follow up on that, I got an interesting account from one of Leno’s regular field piece contributors. As Leno viewers will know, these contributors are brought on stage to banter briefly with Jay before throwing to the piece. That banter is very scripted, obviously, and they’re not trying to fool anybody on that score.

    What this person told me was that Jay is extremely loose and funny in rehearsal. But when it’s the actual taping, he completely stays on the page.

    So Kevin was important in giving Jay no choice but to show us he can be good “in the moment”.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Whoa . . . Tom Cruise on Leno tomorrow? This wasn’t originally scheduled, was it?”

    It wasn’t! Any idea of the context? The Leno site implies he is 2nd guest after Emily Blunt. Unless they are coming out together, but I’m not sure why they would do that. They just shot a movie together, but I don’t think it comes out this year.

    If Cruise is 2nd, that would be fairly remarkable, and would incredibly leave Leno’s booking policy still intact on the eve of May sweeps.

  • Ann

    Kevin seemed like a nice guy but not too bright. I don’t think it was a put on. I think some people read more into his “banter” with Jay than was really there.

  • anonymous

    “I’ll choose my own views, thanks.”

    I’m sorry, but what you see as a black and white business decision base on risk assessment, I see as opportunity denied a person based on decisions determined not on merit but on generalizations about a group applied to a single individual. I’ll leave it at that.

    We’ll see how wise NBC is when they roll out their line-up of Fallon, Meyers, and Baldwin. It may be the case that NBC went from 3 good shows to 1 good show and 2 ratings flops. Remember how bad people said Fallon’s first year was? This time there won’t be The Roots to carry Meyers.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I’m sorry, but what you see as a black and white business decision base on risk assessment, I see as opportunity denied a person based on decisions determined not on merit but on generalizations about a group applied to a single individual.”

    Thank you for expressing your views as your views this time.

    To borrow a Leo Durocher line from “42″, the networks would give 11:30 to an elephant if they thought it would make them money.

    I asked a question last night for those who believe athletics and mental activity are apples and oranges but got no response: is chess an athletic endeavor?

  • Ann

    Janis Klovans (1935-2010): Latvian Grandmaster

    Janis Klovans was born April 9, 1935 and died October 5, 2010. He was Latvia’s champion nine times from 1954 to 1986. He competed in the Soviet Championship a number of times. In 1997, 1999, and 2001 he won the World Senior Championship. In 1976, he gained the title of International Master. After winning the World Senior Championship in 1997 he became Grandmaster Klovans. It seems that he was hardly able to play outside of the USSR in his best years and earn the title earlier.

  • Ann

    “The oldest person to win a state chess championship was Harlow Daly (1883-1979), who won the chess championship of Maine in 1969 at the age of 85.

    The oldest chess player to play postal chess was Jared Moore (1893-1995). He played postal chess until he was 100 years old at died at the age of 101.

    The oldest player to become a master was Oscar Shapiro (1909-2002). He became a USCF master at the age of 74.”

  • Gary Middleton

    Thanks for that, seriously. Confirms that a lot of old people do play chess, and at a high level. And I know older people like chess, I see them playing in the park very obsessively.

    Now tell me, Ann. Why do you think that since the undisputed championship was created in 1886, there has never been a world chess champion over the age of 58? And in the last half-century there hasn’t been one over 48?

    Literally a third of adulthood has never been represented at the very pinnacle of chess. In 127 years. Any theories?

  • Nick

    @Gary: Leno mentioned it on last night’s show, which threw me because I knew he wasn’t scheduled. There was originally (and still is) an open slot on NBC’s schedule for tonight’s show – I just assumed the Black Rebel Motorcycle club would sing and be interviewed . . . but I’m wondering what the case was. Maybe they weren’t sure if Tom Cruise could make it or not? Any how, I see his website updated to show him as appearing tonight, but like you said, in the second slot. We’ll have to watch how it goes I guess.

  • anonymous

    If you are going to draw conclusions by making comparisons, your comparison needs to be close to what you are talking about. Sports is too far a comparison, so is chess.

    Leno is a talk show host, an entertainer. The closer comparison is to Carol King. She’s not going to win any international piano competition, but at 71 she can still sing and perform and people still love her music.

  • Gary Middleton

    “If you are going to draw conclusions by making comparisons, your comparison needs to be close to what you are talking about. Sports is too far a comparison, so is chess.”

    You are moving the goalposts.

    I have been told here that the “39 year old pitcher” scenario is not a valid analogy because physical decline with age is a reality while mental decline is a stereotype. At least to the extent that anyone would say the elderly can’t compete mentally with with much younger people.

    So I ask you, very seriously: why has there not been a world chess champion over the age of 58? Is chess too physical?

  • Douglas in TN

    Well, if you want an entertainment analogy, the recording industry is a good example.

    When I was younger, Barbra Streisand was the biggest selling female artist…her albums went platinum upon shipment. Much of her fan base is gone…many died, many have abandoned her because of her politics. Add in the change in media, and Streisand can now barely break 200,000 in sales. Her last CD barely broke 100,000. Supposedly her last contract negotiations with Sony Music were rough…they weren’t going to pay her through the roof like they used to for such sales. If it weren’t for “Glee” nobody 18-34 would know who Streisand is.

    Former blockbuster artists like Carole King, Aretha Franklin and others have even struggled to get record deals. Aretha Franklin was reduced to making her own recordings and selling them through WalMart.

    Bette Midler was dropped by Atlantic and had only an album by album contract with Sony…she’s without a label for new music.

    Recording stars like Streisand, Tony Bennett and others are being forced by their labels to record disposable duets albums because they sell like hotcakes. Artistically bankrupt, but commercially successful.

    Leno said himself this month the phone is not ringing off the hook for his services. It’s not because people think he’s lost it, necessarily…there is a hesitancy to invest in somebody of his age and potential lack of demo appeal.

  • Gary Middleton

    Thanks, Nick. Tom Cruise as 2nd guest would be something by today’s standards.

    Every once in awhile, this stuff makes me think of the heaviest talk show lineup I can remember in my lifetime. It was an episode in the final weeks of Johnny Carson’s run. The 3 guests that night: Bob Hope, Clint Eastwood, David Letterman. All scheduled, not surprise walk-ons. Could you guess the order without looking it up? I sure couldn’t.

  • anonymous

    @Douglas
    You are right. Barbra Streisand, Aretha Franklin, and Carole King are not topping the charts today. I brought up the example to counter Gary’s concern about mental decline because their profession is a closer example than that of a baseball player or international chess champion.

    There absolutely is mental and physical decline with age, but those declines affect different professions differently. You don’t see Olympic gymnysts past their 20′s. Very true. You don’t see baseball players past their 30′s. Also true. We haven’t seen an international chess champion in the modern era past their 50′s. Also true. Aging affects different professions differently and is strict on gymnasts while more lenient on international chess champions.

  • Brad

    To counter my previous arguements, but to not take them back, I was watching The Tonight Show last night for the interview portion of the show. Carol Burnett was on the show and wow does she still have it. I thought she was sharp, really funny, and still looked good. I was like “get this woman a TV show!” Then her and Leno dropped the bomb that she was going to turn 80 on Friday. I was shocked to hear because here I was wondering why no one is giving her a show.

    Taking a step back, I looked at the other side of it all. She may be sharp still, but she is not the same person she once was. She does voice acting and recently wrote a book which is why she was on Leno last night. Hardly as active as before. I doubt she is in any creative mood too for the same reason. Also, while she was sharp on Leno, that was a one time visit for a few minutes. She also wasn’t hosting the show or doing any kind of act.

    I’m not trying to pick on Burnett or Leno, but after a point you are on the decline performance wise and demo wise. Letterman is the shell of the man he use to be. Leno keeps on become a shell of the host he use to be after the whole Tonight Show debacle. Every bit of it is scripted and without Eubanks there, this is 100% true. The jokes also aren’t as sharp as they use to. Sure they were cheesy before, but now that cheese is hard and stale. Its sad to see, but all the stars go especially when they aren’t being renovative. Leno wants to go out safe and sound, doing the same old thing just doing it a little better then normal knowing that this is the end.

  • anonymous

    @Douglas
    Your concern is a loss of popularity with age. That is a valid concern.

    Look at Leno, unlike Barbra Streisand or Aretha Franklin or Carole King who do not top the charts today, Leno is at the top of his field.

    He beats the younger guys in total viewers, 18-49, and 18-34. What more can you ask? Many people will use Leno’s high median viewer age against him. But you can’t look at that number in isolation. If Kimmel was demolishing Leno 2 to 1 in adults 18-34, then I would say yes Kimmel will eventually outpace Leno and gain the lead.

    18-34 is the hardest group to get. If Leno is getting the most from the hardest age group to get, then chances are he is also winning 35-40, 41-45,46-49. Throw out all of Leno’s viewers over 49. If Leno is getting more people in the demo than Kimmel is at all age breakdowns, then Kimmel will never overtake Leno. It is just that Leno appeals to all age groups and there are so many people over 49 who watch him that the median age number is high and people see that as a negative. Look at the opposite, someone who doesn’t have broad appeal and has the lowest median viewer age. Conan still gets less viewers 18-34 than Leno and his demo number is 0.4/0.5

    People make more out of Leno’s high median viewer age than they should.

  • Douglas in TN

    But the big question…and maybe we learned the answer with Conan O’Brien…to what extent are Jay Leno’s #1 ratings (even softened) because he has such a die hard base, or because he is host of The Tonight Show?

    I’ve said it before…there are some dedicated Jay fans here (even one wacko), but is there a groundswell Jay Leno fan base out there? I really didn’t see much of an outrage by fans when it was announced he was being canned. There seemed to be, even by Dave Letterman, more head tilting than anything else, people just being baffled more than anything.

  • Gary Middleton

    “You are right. Barbra Streisand, Aretha Franklin, and Carole King are not topping the charts today. I brought up the example to counter Gary’s concern about mental decline because their profession is a closer example than that of a baseball player or international chess champion.”

    If Streisand, Aretha, and Carole King depended heavily on quick mental reactions, then you’d be on to something. In reality, that example is not in the ballpark.

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