Late Night TV Ratings For April 8-12, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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April 18th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

LENO, FALLON CONTINUE TO TOP THE LATE-NIGHT COMPETITION DURING THE WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

 

Tonight Show’ Delivers Biggest 18-49 Audience in 10 Weeks While ‘Late Night’ Beats Ferguson, ‘Nightline’ in All Key Ratings Categories

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — April 18, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” delivered its biggest 18-49 demo audience in 10 weeks as it defeated “Late Show with David Letterman” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” in 18-49 viewers and total viewers for the week of April 8-12.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET, NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and ABC’s “Nightline” during their head-to-head half-hour in every key ratings category. Note that CBS's Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded from the weekly averages due to delays for sports coverage, while Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Leno bested Kimmel in all key ratings categories — adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers. And while “Tonight” and “Late Show” both rounded to a 0.8 rating in 18-49, Jay delivered the bigger audience in that key demo, 1.047 million to 974,000. That 1.047 million viewers was Jay’s biggest 18-49 audience since the week of Jan. 28-Feb. 1.

 

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than Letterman for the last 21 weeks in a row and topped Kimmel for 12 of their 14 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered Letterman for 25 weeks in a row and Kimmel for 14 of 14 weeks.

 

Versus the same week last year, Fallon was up 10 percent in adults 18-49 (to 668,000 from the year-ago 610,000), up 21 percent in adults 18-34 (289,000 vs. 238,000) and up 3 percent in total viewers (1.658 million vs. 1.609 million). Season to date, Fallon is up 7 percent in viewers 18-34 (297,000 vs. 278,000).

 

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than Ferguson for 26 of the last 27 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 23 of the last 25 weeks. Versus “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC newsmagazine series for 14 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 10 of the last 11 weeks in total viewers.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of April 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.8/3*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/3*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.3 million viewers*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.4 million viewers with encore telecasts*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.4 million viewers

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers*

 

* CBS’s Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded due to delays for sports coverage. Friday’s “Last Call” and “Kimmel” were encores.

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

** Since January 8.

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.7

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.5 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.8 million

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  • Ann

    As Gary likes to quote Dylan Thomas when it suits his purpose…

    ““Do not go gentle into that good night,
    Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
    Rage, rage against the dying of the light.”

  • Gary Middleton

    Ann, you are conflating 2 separate things.

    One is my support for a person to continue singing, doing comedy, acting, pitching, anything they please for as long as they wish to do it.

    Another is the right of a TV network or baseball team to calculate how one person is likely to perform over the course of a contract vs. another.

    Gordon Lightfoot should sing all he likes. Jay should do comedy all he likes. If Tom Seaver decides he wants to pitch again, outstanding. But there’s no moral imperative for them to be allowed to do it on the same stages they were on when they were in their prime if the owners of those stages have other ideas.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Didn’t Dick Clark’s New Year’s Rockin’ Eve dominate the competition even after he had a stroke?”

    Yes, one night a year he was on camera for 3 minutes and counted backwards from 10.

    I don’t think that would’ve flown 210 nights a year.

  • bonnie blue

    Told you we loved you, Jay!!! Way to go …

  • anonymous

    “I don’t think that would’ve flown 210 nights a year.”

    The point is that Dick Clark dominated the competition even in his old age. People could have easily chosen to watch another network, but they didn’t because they liked him.

    Leno does the same thing, only he does it 210 nights a year, because people like him despite his old age. To say he can’t hack it for much longer is not right.

  • anonymous

    When Fallon takes over T.T.S. he won’t be pulling 0.9’s and will be lucky if he could tie what Leno is getting. Fallon is the cheaper guy, not the better guy. Fallon is the ultimate cheerleader.

  • Brad

    I don’t get why everyone is not getting this. Putting your faith in the hands of a senior citizen to do a daily show year after year is not something of success. All these other older folks are either not doing their shows live which helps keep the show edgy, Betty White, and Regis Philbin is doing interviews with guests. He isn’t the star of the show. Sure it’s Regis and we all love Regis, but not every second of the show is all about Regis. Same can be said about Larry King.

    When it comes to late night, the shows really should be called The Conan O’Brien Show or The Jay Leno Show or what have you. It really does become their show and they are front and center. It is the host, like Leno, who goes up to camera for the monologue all by himself and then the second act all by himself except when he has guests for “Meal or No Meal”. That half the show all about Jay.

    I really like Leno but there no way a new network will take him on. It is one thing to get renewals from your current network, it is another thing to start up a franchise at another network at nearly 63 years old.

  • Gary Middleton

    “The point is that Dick Clark dominated the competition even in his old age. People could have easily chosen to watch another network, but they didn’t because they liked him.”

    OK, it’s not a point that really covers what we’re talking about, since no performance by Dick was required in that highly unique 3 minute situation.

    “Leno does the same thing, only he does it 210 nights a year”

    No, Leno gives a highly unique and demanding performance. It involves a lot of learning of material and delivering that material live-to-tape, fast paced, in a variety of pitches and inflections and dialects. There is a precision to comedy, even the simplest and dumbest joke.

  • Gary Middleton

    Anonymous, just to take your example all the way: if Jay were to have a stroke and be rendered without clear speech do you really believe 18-49 year old viewers would continue to watch night after night, all year long, years into the future?

  • anonymous

    Obviously not. Health is a concern but age should not be. If Leno remains healthy like George Burns, what difference does it make that he’s old as long as he can still perform and people still like him? The Dick Clark example is just to show that tv is more about who people like rather than their ages.

    It’s sad to see the culture of The Simpsons take over, where old people are dismissed and ignored and devalued and laughed at.

  • anonymous

    The idea that Leno is a risky investment is also not right. You know exactly what you are going to get. You’ll get 0.8’s with current lead-ins. You can produce the show relatively cheap that can fill a lot of air time year round.
    It’s a safe bet compared to the money pit called 10 pm dramas.

    Ask NBC how many hundreds of millions of dollars it has put into 10 pm dramas that bomb: Smash, The Firm, Awake…. the list goes on and on and on for years.

  • Diana Santiago

    The reason NBC is getting rid of Leno is the same reason they got rid of Conan in 2010: they are going with the cheapest option.

    It is not an issue of age, talent, ratings, legacy… it is just for money.

  • Douglas in TN

    ” You’ll get 0.8?s ”

    Problem with that is that just a few years ago Leno was pulling in the 1.5 areas, then sunk down to the 1.0s, then down to the 0.8s and sometimes lower. Part was decline of network viewer declines, and some was due to Lenogate of 2010. But his numbers have sunk much since 2010.

    So, in theory, Leno on Fox would, like so many, start with a bang…but where would it settle at 0.5? A Fox Leno show would look almost exactly like Leno’s other shows…is that a Fox audience?

  • Gary Middleton

    “Health is a concern but age should not be. If Leno remains healthy like George Burns, what difference does it make that he’s old as long as he can still perform and people still like him?”

    George Burns was basically done with series television by age 65.

    Age should make no difference to Leno if he wants to keep going. It should make a huge difference to a network that is contemplating a material long term investment.

  • Douglas in TN

    “Way to go …”

    He is going, Bonnie…next February!

  • GARebelman

    I’m starting to think Gary is just bashing Jay to make himself feel better at this point. Yeesh.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I’m starting to think Gary is just bashing Jay”

    Not only am I not bashing Jay, I’m not even talking about Jay. I’m talking about networks and how they incorporate actuarial-type assumptions into their investment decisions.

    It’s like saying someone who supports a minimum driving age is bashing Rico Rodriguez from Modern Family.

  • anonymous

    Old does not mean decrepit. Morgan Freeman is 75 and his mental capacity hasn’t depreciated that much. He’s still actively working and popular. Letterman might work till he’s 70. But for some reason, Leno’s done when he reaches 63?

    Conan can make a show for $40 million a year; I don’t see why a network can’t do the same for Leno if he was willing to do it.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Morgan Freeman is 75 and his mental capacity hasn’t depreciated that much. He’s still actively working and popular.”

    Morgan makes movies, where you shoot a minute of dialogue a day and spend the rest of the day lounging in a trailer.

    Series TV is different. Let me put it this way. When the Golden Girls started, all 4 Golden Girls were younger than Jay is now. And that was a show about the elderly.

    “Letterman might work till he’s 70. But for some reason, Leno’s done when he reaches 63?”

    If CBS had a Jimmy Fallon, I think Dave would be on the way out.

  • anonymous

    Letterman beat Kimmel 0.8 to 0.6 in this press release. Looks like old people are held to a higher and stricter standard than the young guys who get a pass.

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