Late Night TV Ratings For April 8-12, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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April 18th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

LENO, FALLON CONTINUE TO TOP THE LATE-NIGHT COMPETITION DURING THE WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

 

Tonight Show’ Delivers Biggest 18-49 Audience in 10 Weeks While ‘Late Night’ Beats Ferguson, ‘Nightline’ in All Key Ratings Categories

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — April 18, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” delivered its biggest 18-49 demo audience in 10 weeks as it defeated “Late Show with David Letterman” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” in 18-49 viewers and total viewers for the week of April 8-12.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET, NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and ABC’s “Nightline” during their head-to-head half-hour in every key ratings category. Note that CBS's Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded from the weekly averages due to delays for sports coverage, while Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Leno bested Kimmel in all key ratings categories — adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers. And while “Tonight” and “Late Show” both rounded to a 0.8 rating in 18-49, Jay delivered the bigger audience in that key demo, 1.047 million to 974,000. That 1.047 million viewers was Jay’s biggest 18-49 audience since the week of Jan. 28-Feb. 1.

 

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than Letterman for the last 21 weeks in a row and topped Kimmel for 12 of their 14 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered Letterman for 25 weeks in a row and Kimmel for 14 of 14 weeks.

 

Versus the same week last year, Fallon was up 10 percent in adults 18-49 (to 668,000 from the year-ago 610,000), up 21 percent in adults 18-34 (289,000 vs. 238,000) and up 3 percent in total viewers (1.658 million vs. 1.609 million). Season to date, Fallon is up 7 percent in viewers 18-34 (297,000 vs. 278,000).

 

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than Ferguson for 26 of the last 27 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 23 of the last 25 weeks. Versus “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC newsmagazine series for 14 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 10 of the last 11 weeks in total viewers.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of April 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.8/3*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/3*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.3 million viewers*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.4 million viewers with encore telecasts*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.4 million viewers

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers*

 

* CBS’s Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded due to delays for sports coverage. Friday’s “Last Call” and “Kimmel” were encores.

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

** Since January 8.

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.7

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.5 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.8 million

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  • Monikka

    Ronald Reagan as an indicator of competent old age?!

    We can trace the current polarization of our country to his “ah shucks, let me help my rich friends out as much as possible” policies. I won’t even mention his role in bringing the nutjob religious right to the fore.

    Competent old age, my…foot.

    There are plenty of vital elders out there. Reagan wasn’t one of them.

  • Diana Santiago

    NBCU continues to monetize Jimmy Fallon. His cable channel Esquire (former G4) is going to air Late Night at 7:00 pm, starting summer.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I’m just pointing out people past 63 who don’t show that decline and are/were still productive.”

    Straw man. Everyone knows it’s possible for people past 63 to be productive.

    The issue is whether a network will choose to make a large multiyear investment in a 64 year old late night host, given the range of programming alternatives. My bet is placed.

  • anonymous

    Again, you are the one who is pushing the arguement that networks won’t pick up Leno because of his old age.

    Leno has a history of winning, and does it with poor lead-ins.

  • Adam Stabelli

    A network WILL pick up Jay. Why? He wins the ratings. Simple as.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Again, you are the one who is pushing the arguement that networks won’t pick up Leno because of his old age.”

    Yes, but not because a 64 year old can’t possibly be productive. Or can’t possibly host a talk show. But because of the inherent *risk* that skills and popular appeal will materially erode over the course of a multiyear contract, *relative to other options*.

    Your replies are the same straw man argument over and over.

  • Gary Middleton

    Monikka, politics aside, there were substantial effects of Reagan’s aging in that 2nd term. Forgetting things, forgetting people, having Nancy feed him answers to simple questions. There is some dispute over whether he was already in the very early stages of Alzheimer’s.

    Tell you whose skills really did seem stunningly intact as of age 75: Joan Rivers. She mauled her face to the point that she’s hard to look at, so it’s always something that catches up with you. But her lucidity, quickness, insight, voice quality all seemed completely intact as she promoted that documentary.

  • Neal

    Exactly Adam. Leno will get offers as his departure date nears even from NBC!

  • Gary Middleton

    On the booking front, Kimmel is taking Robert Downey a week after Leno. While Leno holds his ground into sweeps.

    And might be interesting when Matt Lauer visits May 2. A summit of the two NBC stars who found themselves in the crosshairs of public opinion. Will be interesting if either of them mention making the Star’s “20 Most Hated Celebrity” list. Gwyneth Paltrow, who was #1 on that list, visits Jay Thursday. Wonder if it’ll come up.

  • Douglas in TN

    “I Used to Be a Talk Show Host…Help Me Please, Starring Jay Leno”

    Coming to RFD-TV, March 2014.

  • Ann

    Although it will be a blip, it will be interesting to see what kind of rating TTS got on Friday with a rerun. NBC had the highest broadcast network rating for covering the capture of the Marathon bombing suspect.

    2.4 18-49

  • Gary Middleton

    Ann, decent chance we’ll never know due to local pre-emptions. There’s an adjusted final number we usually don’t get to see.

  • Gary Middleton

    As it stands now, Ann, that NBC coverage was adjusted down to 2.1, Kimmel’s rerun beat Leno’s rerun, and Nightline’s 12:35 a.m. broadcast tied Leno.

    In Late-Night Metered Markets Friday night:

    In Nielsen’s 56 metered markets, household results were: “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” 2.6/6 with an encore telecast; CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman,” 2.1/5 with an encore; and ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” 2.6/6.

    In the 25 markets with Local People Meters, adult 18-49 Wednesday results were: “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” 0.8/4 with an encore; “Late Show,” 0.5/2 with an encore; and “Jimmy Kimmel Live,” 1.0/5.

    From 12:35-1:05 a.m. ET Wednesday night, ABC’s “Nightline” averaged a 1.8/5 in metered-market households and a 0.8/4 in 18-49 in the Local People Meters.

  • Brad

    If they could get Leno to share a studio with someone it could work. My concern is that with it being a daily show, it won’t work. Maher runs Real Time in the same studio as The Price Is Right. It only works for Maher and HBO because it is a weekly, not a daily. I think Leno could get a weekly somewhere, but not daily. A daily would require too much work, staff members and startup fees. A weekly wouldn’t require its own studio, staff members would be part time, and the network can easily get out from under their investimate.

    Other than that guys, I can’t see a network investing in Leno to do a daily.

  • Neal

    I could see Leno doing a weekly show as he winds his career down. His ratings would be even higher!

  • anonymous

    “The issue is whether a network will choose to make a large multiyear investment in a 64 year old late night host.”

    “because of the inherent *risk* that skills and popular appeal will materially erode over the course of a multiyear contract”

    If you are making an issue out of “risk”, what is the riskier investment, an unproven talent who might be a ratings flop, or an experienced host who can deliver the ratings but might fall ill any day?

    If the unproven talent is a flop, the show is quickly cancelled (Lopez after 2 seasons, Chevy Chase after a few weeks).

    The experienced host who can deliver the ratings may be healthy for years.

  • Gary Middleton

    “what is the riskier investment, an unproven talent who might be a ratings flop, or an experienced host who can deliver the ratings but might fall ill any day?”

    I don’t know, but the options don’t just involve unproven talent. The Fox network affiliates currently air a wide variety of programming alternatives.

    And it’s not so much about “falling ill any day” as much as about slowing down, skills eroding, becoming less consistent.

    CBS has no proven alternative, so they’re sticking with Declining Dave. But were there no CBS Letterman show already in existence, would they launch one now? I think not.

  • anonymous

    In this day and age, it is extremely difficult to make something that can connect with people and be a hit. For every Big Bang Theory, there are a hundred forgetable sit-coms that fail.

    When you have something that people actually like, it shouldn’t be taken for granted and so easily thrown away, because something like that might not come around again for a long time.

  • Ann

    “CBS has no proven alternative, so they’re sticking with Declining Dave. But were there no CBS Letterman show already in existence, would they launch one now? I think not.”

    That’s an impossible theory to prove. There’s nothing to indicate that the networks have lost interest in late night talk shows. In fact the game of musical chairs being played says otherwise. What’s over is big budget shows where hosts make $30 million+ a year.

    IMO broadcast TV is in decline in general. All that’s left is reality competitions, dramas that appeal to morbid interests, and a very few watchable sitcoms. I barely watch it anymore.

  • Gary Middleton

    I didn’t say they wouldn’t launch a talk show. I said they wouldn’t launch a Letterman show.

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