Late Night TV Ratings For April 8-12, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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April 18th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

LENO, FALLON CONTINUE TO TOP THE LATE-NIGHT COMPETITION DURING THE WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

 

Tonight Show’ Delivers Biggest 18-49 Audience in 10 Weeks While ‘Late Night’ Beats Ferguson, ‘Nightline’ in All Key Ratings Categories

 

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — April 18, 2013 — “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” delivered its biggest 18-49 demo audience in 10 weeks as it defeated “Late Show with David Letterman” and “Jimmy Kimmel Live” in 18-49 viewers and total viewers for the week of April 8-12.

 

At 12:35 a.m. ET, NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” and ABC’s “Nightline” during their head-to-head half-hour in every key ratings category. Note that CBS's Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded from the weekly averages due to delays for sports coverage, while Friday's "Kimmel" was an encore.

 

Leno bested Kimmel in all key ratings categories — adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers. And while “Tonight” and “Late Show” both rounded to a 0.8 rating in 18-49, Jay delivered the bigger audience in that key demo, 1.047 million to 974,000. That 1.047 million viewers was Jay’s biggest 18-49 audience since the week of Jan. 28-Feb. 1.

 

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than Letterman for the last 21 weeks in a row and topped Kimmel for 12 of their 14 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered Letterman for 25 weeks in a row and Kimmel for 14 of 14 weeks.

 

Versus the same week last year, Fallon was up 10 percent in adults 18-49 (to 668,000 from the year-ago 610,000), up 21 percent in adults 18-34 (289,000 vs. 238,000) and up 3 percent in total viewers (1.658 million vs. 1.609 million). Season to date, Fallon is up 7 percent in viewers 18-34 (297,000 vs. 278,000).

 

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than Ferguson for 26 of the last 27 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 23 of the last 25 weeks. Versus “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC newsmagazine series for 14 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 10 of the last 11 weeks in total viewers.

 

WEEKLY AVERAGES

 

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of April 8-12. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted. Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.8/3*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/3*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/3*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.4 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.3 million viewers*

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.4 million viewers with encore telecasts*

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.4 million viewers

 

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers*

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers*

 

* CBS’s Monday, Thursday and Friday results are excluded due to delays for sports coverage. Friday’s “Last Call” and “Kimmel” were encores.

 

SEASON TO DATE

 

ADULTS 18-49

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

 

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Show,” 3.1 million viewers

 

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

 

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

 

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

 

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

 

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

 

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

 

** Since January 8.

 

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF APRIL 8-12

 

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.7

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.6

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

 

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

 

TOTAL VIEWERS

 

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. “The Daily Show,” 1.5 million

 

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million

 

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.8 million

 

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

 

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
  • Ann

    Letterman is a bad example. He’s #2, has had health problems, and has reduced his involvement in producing, and is probably not that interested in continuing much longer. Again, Gary, my disagreement with you is that you paint everyone of a certain age with the same brush which is basically prejudice.

    I agree that it is unlikely ABC would dump Kimmel and hire Jay because that prejudice is in play. To me it’s the difference between would and should. They wouldn’t hire Jay because of his age in all likelihood, but that doesn’t necessarily follow that they shouldn’t. There’s a lot of reasons not to give Arsenio Hall another talk show, even a syndicated one, but he’s got one.

    TBH, I’m quite surprised at your attitude. That’s the kind of perspective I would expect from a twenty-something, and not from someone your age.

  • Gary Middleton

    Letterman is a perfect example of that particular point. Which is that there are shows that a network would stay with if they already existed- but not necessarily launch.

    The other stuff you said is beyond me. Far as I can grasp, failing to factor the risks of aging into a significant multiyear investment in a single human would be extreme dereliction of duty.

  • Douglas in TN

    Ann…I think you’re reading into Gary’s comments something he isn’t saying.

    I don’t think he’s saying that other outlets shouldn’t look at Jay Leno to start another type of television franchise…I think he’s saying is the reality is that the industry has a hard time taking anybody seriously who is outside of the demographic eyeballs they crave.

    And that reality is true, even in the outside world. I’m just a few years younger than Leno. If I went to start another career, at my age, I’d be thumped. As a teacher (30+ years), even if I went to start with another district I probably wouldn’t get another call back.

    I see it here. Tennessee Valley Authority recently got rid of their police department. Many of these career men are in their 50s…too young to retire, too old to start a new similar job. It’s a horrible feeling in limbo for them.

    The reason(s) NBC fired Jay Leno are the same reason(s) other outlets are going to look at him with doubt. No matter where he goes, he will almost certainly not get the same ratings he got on NBC at 11:30…is that worth investing between $50 and $100 million on? Would you invest in it?

  • Gary Middleton

    Douglas, all true, but to Ann’s right that I’ve taken the argument further. I think a 65 year old late night host is akin to a 39 year old major league pitcher. Where the risk that their skills will erode to the point of non-competitiveness is significant and must be factored into a multiyear investment decision.

    Yes, if demographics were unimportant, it would be make a big difference. In that case, the potential reward would be more likely to outweigh the risk.

  • rif

    The question is whether Jay is an exception to the age trend. A multi-year investment in a 39-year old pitcher is usually not a good idea, but if it were 39-year old Nolan Ryan, that would have worked out pretty well. Does Fox or ABC view Jay as a potential Nolan Ryan of late night? Who knows.

  • Gary Middleton

    “A multi-year investment in a 39-year old pitcher is usually not a good idea, but if it were 39-year old Nolan Ryan, that would have worked out pretty well.”

    There is no way of knowing in advance.

    Hence, when the Rangers signed Nolan as a free agent in 1988- with several great seasons and 2 no-hitters ahead of him- it was a one year deal. One year. For one of the great pitchers in the history of the game.

    The Rangers were able to control their risk in a way that a network signing Leno cannot. The economics would require a multiyear plan and tens of millions invested.

  • Gary Middleton

    Reese Witherspoon is suddenly a huge booking for Fallon.

  • anonymous

    Sports — physical skills required. absolute risk of decline as proven by history.

    Talk show host — mental skills required. the level of risk is not the same as proven by the countless examples of old people who are still mentally sharp. Is there a risk? Yes. But the risk of decline is not absolute as in sports.

  • Ann

    Again, Jay IS the exception.

    Frankly, to compare a talk show host to an athlete is comparing apples to oranges. To imply that people in their 60′s aren’t sharp enough to be a talk show host is ridiculous. I wonder if you would be willing to apply the same standards to 60 year old Howard Stern and his radio show.

    The problem with Fox IMO is the 10 o’clock is local programming which presents a lead in problem. If Fox programming lasted until 11 like the other networks, I think an 11:35 talk show would have a better chance of succeeding.

  • Douglas in TN

    If you want an apples to apples, then compare Leno to Milton Berle, who, after getting the name Mr. Television was reduced to hosting a bowling show in the early 1960s.

  • Ann

    @Douglas

    Berle was not let go when he was still #1.

    I forgot in what article I read this, but the observation was made the CBS is somewhat amused about how anxious NBC is to get rid of their #1 guy.

  • Douglas in TN

    No, but Berle is an example of how one can be the toast of a network one minute, then a near-has been the next.

    You’re all expecting something from Jay Leno that he will likely not be able to achieve.

  • Ann

    Look, Douglas, at this point no one even knows whether Jay even wants another talk show. He may be fed up with all the abuse and disrespect he’s suffered from NBC.

    Your dislike of Leno is well recorded here, so pardon me if I see you as less than objective.

  • Douglas in TN

    And you’re far from objective too, so you have no right to be pissy as you have been. Get over yourself.

  • anonymous

    “As a teacher (30+ years), even if I went to start with another district I probably wouldn’t get another call back.”

    Does that mean that you are too much of a risk of suddenly not being able to perform your job which you have ample experience to draw upon, or that those societal attitudes are unfairly holding back a whole segment of the population that is living longer due to medical advances?

  • Douglas in TN

    One pressure that I occasionally feel, that Leno has felt, is that I know the district would love to see me retire ASAP. That way they could bring in a younger replacement (if they replaced at all), who would be starting out at a much base level of pay, with a cheaper benefits and retirement package. If I retired at the end of this year, the district may save, if they replaced me, about $20-25K, much of that an annual savings for the next few years.

    Leno was fired partially because of the same reason. Even if Fallon pulls in lower numbers, which is possible, NBC is saving a lot of money with a cheaper show and cheaper host. That’s it. It’s not about Leno’s lame comedy, or his shots at the network…it’s all about $$$$$.

  • Ann

    @Douglas

    You’ve been called out more than once by others for your hatred of Leno. It’s just not my observation.

  • Douglas in TN

    And I’ll ask again for proof of my “hatred” for Jay Leno.

    I’ve asked three times, and haven’t been provided an example beyond criticism. So your post is not valid.

  • Drum

    Reese Witherspoon cancels on ‘Late Night,’ ‘Good Morning America’.
    washingtonpost blogs/tv-column/post/reese-witherspoon-cancels-on-jimmy-fallon-good-morning-america-after-arrest/2013/04/22/48d3cee0-ab9a-11e2-b6fd-ba6f5f26d70e_blog.html

  • Gary Middleton

    “To imply that people in their 60?s aren’t sharp enough to be a talk show host is ridiculous.”

    Not one person here has said that, and at least 3 times I have said the exact opposite. One of the things dragging this conversation out so interminably is nobody seems comfortable dealing with the actual argument I’m making.

    “I wonder if you would be willing to apply the same standards to 60 year old Howard Stern and his radio show.”

    Of course. Howard does as few as 8 shows a month now.

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