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TV Ratings Tuesday: 'The Voice' Falls, 'Grimm' & 'Hart of Dixie' Steady + 'Dancing With the Stars' & 'NCIS:LA' Up

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Written By

May 8th, 2013

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Scoreboard NBC CBS FOX UNI ABC CW
Adults 18-49: Rating/Share 3.0/9 2.2/6 1.8/5 1.5/4 1.3/4 0.4/1
Adults 18-34: Rating/Share 2.2/7 1.2/4 1.7/6 1.3/4 0.8/3 0.4/1
Total Viewers (million) 9.436 12.380 4.006 3.836 7.666 0.948

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NBC was the number one network in adults 18-49 while CBS was on top with total viewers.

On NBC, The Voice earned a 3.6, down three tenths from last week's 3.9 adults 18-49 rating. Grimm was even with last week's 1.9 adults 18-49 rating.

On CBS NCIS garnered a 2.9, down two tenths from last week's 3.1 adults 18-49 rating. NCIS: Los Angeles earned a 2.4, up two tenths after last week's series low 2.2 adults 18-49 rating. Golden Boy earned a 1.2, down a tenth after last week's 1.3 adults 18-49 rating.

On ABC, Splash earned a 1.0, up a tenth after last week's series low 0.9 adults 18-49 rating. Dancing with the Stars scored a 1.7, up two tenths after last week's series low 1.5 adults 18-49. Body Of Proof earned a 1.4, down two tenths after its last original's 1.6 adults 18-49 rating.

On FOX, Hell’s Kitchen earned a 1.9, down two tenths from last week's 2.0 adults 18-49 rating. New Girl scored a 2.1, up a tenth from last week's 2.0 adults 18-49. The Mindy Project was even with last week's 1.3 adults 18-49 rating.

On The CW, Hart Of Dixie was even with last week's 0.5 18-49 rating.

 

Broadcast primetime ratings for May 7, 2013

Time Net Show 18-49 Rating 18-49 Share Viewers Live+SD (million)
8:00PM NBC The Voice (8-10PM) 3.6 10 11.15
CBS NCIS 2.9 9 16.99
FOX Hell's Kitchen 1.9 6 4.67
ABC Splash 1.0 3 4.36
CW Hart Of Dixie 0.5 2 1.24
tvbythenumbers.com
9:00PM CBS NCIS: Los Angeles 2.4 6 13.02
FOX New Girl 2.1 6 3.97
ABC Dancing with the Stars 1.7 4 10.51
CW America's Next Top Model -R 0.2 1 0.65
9:30PM FOX The Mindy Project 1.3 3 2.71
tvbythenumbers.com
10:00PM NBC Grimm 1.9 5 6.01
ABC Body Of Proof 1.4 4 8.14
CBS Golden Boy 1.2 3 7.13
In Late-Night Metered Markets Tuesday night:
  • In Nielsen's 56 metered markets, household results were: "The Tonight Show with Jay Leno," 2.4/6; CBS's "Late Show with David Letterman," 2.2/6; and ABC's "Jimmy Kimmel Live," 2.2/6.
 
  • In the 25 markets with Local People Meters, adult 18-49 Wednesday results were: “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno,” 0.8/4; "Late Show," 0.5/2; and "Jimmy Kimmel Live," 0.6/3.
 
  • From 12:35-1:05 a.m. ET Wednesday night, ABC's "Nightline" averaged a 1.4/5 in metered-market households and a 0.4/2 in 18-49 in the Local People Meters.
 
  • From 12:35-1:35 a.m. ET, "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" (1.2/4 in metered-market households) tied CBS's "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson" (1.2/4).  In the 25 markets with Local People Meters, "Late Night" (0.5/3 in 18-49) topped "Late Late Show" (0.3/2).
 
  • At 1:35 a.m., "Last Call with Carson Daly" averaged a 0.8/3 in metered-market households and a 0.3/3 in adults 18-49 in the 25 markets with local people meters.

Fast Affiliate Ratings: These first national ratings, including demographics, are available at approximately 11 AM (ET) the day after telecast, and are released to subscribing customers daily. These data, from the National People Meter sample, are strictly time-period information, based on the normal broadcast network feed, and include all programming on the affiliated stations, sometimes including network programming, sometimes not. The figures may include stations that did not air the entire network feed, as well as local news breaks or cutaways for local coverage or other programming. Fast Affiliate ratings are not as useful for live programs and are likely to differ significantly from the final results, because the data reflect normal broadcast feed patterns. For example, with a World Series game, Fast Affiliate Ratings would include whatever aired from 8-11PM on affiliates in the Pacific Time Zone, following the live football game, but not game coverage that begins at 5PM PT. The same would be true of Presidential debates as well as live award shows and breaking news reports.

Rating: Estimated percentage of the universe of TV households (or other specified group) tuned to a program in the average minute. Ratings are expressed as a percent.

Share (of Audience): The percent of households (or persons) using television who are tuned to a specific program, station or network in a specific area at a specific time. (See also, Rating, which represents tuning or viewing as a percent of the entire population being measured.)

Time Shifted Viewing – Program ratings for national sources are produced in three streams of data – Live, Live+Same Day (Live+SD) and Live+7 Day. Time shifted figures account for incremental viewing that takes place with DVRs. Live+Same Day (Live+SD) include viewing during the same broadcast day as the original telecast, with a cut-off of 3:00AM local time when meters transmit daily viewing to Nielsen for processing. Live+7 Day ratings include incremental viewing that takes place during the 7 days following a telecast.

For more information see Numbers 101 and Numbers 102.

 
  • Max Vrany

    @TJ, There’s a writeup somewhere around here, but preemptions and overruns are the 2 biggest factors. Differences in half-hours do not cause adjustments.

  • Ultima

    @BigBrotherFan
    Viewers 50+ get the shaft.

    I don’t think so. Sure, there’s the occasional old-skewing drama that simply can’t pull enough ad revenue (e.g. Harry’s Law), but there is plenty of old-skewing programming that is on year after year.

    I think the crowd obsessed with so-called “smart” dramas or sci-fi programming has it much worse off (at least on broadcast).

  • ron

    @Tommy No! It was cancelled because we’re talking NBC and there decision making have been questionable for some time. It was picked up for a second year but due to cast changes it lost some viewers.

  • Tommy M.

    @ TJ,

    “Can anyone tell me why and when a show is adjusted up or down?”

    There are many reasons for adjustments. Local preemptions, for sports or news for example, can cause a downward adjustment in the final ratings because people watching whatever aired instead of the regularly scheduled program are initially counted in the over night ratings. Since they didn’t actually watch the regularly scheduled program, those viewers get stripped out in the final ratings. Other things like the previous show running over into another shows timeslot can also cause an adjustment.

  • PurpleDrazi

    @TJ – Sorry you can’t post links anymore but if you wait until they post the adjusted numbers they usually have a link that explains why shows adjust up and down. (keep an eye out for blue text at the top of the write-up)

  • Alex

    @ron
    Do you know why “older skewing” shows last year after year? Because they sell advertising spots and this keeps them both sucessful and profitable.

    Just for the record the vast majority of broadcast shows skew outside of the 18-49 demo and its probably fair to say that almost all of them skew 50+ so the notion that ‘older skewing’ shows survive isn’t a ground breaking thing. By my very quick maths the Fox shows were the only shows on broadcast last night where the majority of the audience actually came from the 18-49 demo. This is to say that skewing old doesn’t matter as long as you’re bringing younger viewers along with you. If you don’t bring younger viewers along with you then you end up in the position that Harry’s Law was in where you’ve got the biggest total audience of a scripted show on your network but you get cancelled because almost none of that audience is under 50. NCIS doesn’t survive because it gets 17 million viewers it survives because of those 17 million a decent enough proportion fit in the 18-49 demo.

  • Ultima

    @ron

    Still waiting for you to explain why it costs nearly twice as much to buy a 30-second ad spot on New Girl than it does on NCIS.

    Come on, you’re so smart and clearly know what you’re talking about. I’m sure you have some way of explaining it!

  • AA

    6 million views for Grimm. Awesome!

  • Tommy M.

    @ ron, while NBC is in rough shape the cancellation of Harry’s Law isn’t just from poor decision making. I used Harry’s Law because it is the most recent show I can think of that clearly shows that when it comes down to it, total viewers are meaningless for anything besides a press release!

  • Penny

    @BigBrotherFan u off ur meds again?

  • Alex

    @Ultima
    Still waiting for you to explain why it costs nearly twice as much to buy a 30-second ad spot on New Girl than it does on NCIS.

    To be fair that price disparity will have more involved than just the difference in average age of the audience. There’s more to ad rates than the age of the audience.

  • Robin

    I wish more people would watch Golden Boy. Despite the dumb name it really is a good show.

  • ron

    @Alex My problem is not with the younger audience, it is with the insanity that puts the bracket at 18. They have no buying power unless you think a Big Mac counts. When they graduate from college or have put in several years on a job, then and only then, do they qualify as a true buyer of advertising products. Get rid of the 18-24 useless numbers and put the truth in the numbers by changing it to 25-59; that’s where the buying power truly is.

  • senor chang

    @ron
    Too bad advertisers think otherwise. There’s merits for both targeting young and old demographics, but until advertisers suddenly change their minds, it’s irrelevant to which shows get cancelled and renewed.

  • BigBrotherFan

    Ultima

    Yes. I agree with that too but old skewing shows like Blue Bloods prove me wrong.

    Penny
    DUMBEST COMMENT EVER!

  • Tommy M.

    @ ron, this is just getting comical at this point. You’re entitled to think that buying power has anything to do with it, just as I’m entitled to know that is wrong. Keep believing what you want, but don’t be shocked when a show that get’s a gazillion total viewers gets canceled due to low demo performance again.

  • Max Vrany

    @ron, NBC knew exactly what they were doing when they canceled Harry’s Law. The show was losing money because it didn’t have enough revenue because it didn’t have enough young viewers.

    On the other, hand NBC made the worst decision ever when they greenlit The Voice, so you might be right. :wink:

  • Ultima

    @ron
    They have no buying power unless you think a Big Mac counts.

    McDonald’s brought in ~$27 BILLION in revenues each of the past two years…

    Get rid of the 18-24 useless numbers and put the truth in the numbers by changing it to 25-59; that’s where the buying power truly is.

    Again, this is a TV ratings website. You should find a place where people talk about advertising strategies.

    Advertisers pay more for younger adults. It does not matter if that is a good idea or not. As long as they continue to do so, the networks will make their decisions based on that. They need to sell the product the advertisers are interested in buying.

  • BigBrotherFan

    They should just take all these old people shows and create a network that doesn’t give a rats behind about the 18-49..it play nothing but these JESSE STONE movies, Blue Bloods, all the CSI’s, Vegas, Undercover boss, Body of Proof, Malibu Country, Last Man Standing, 20/20, 48 hours, Rock Centre, Touch, Elementry.

  • Max Vrany

    @ron, You answered your own question. Young adults have limited buying power and watch less TV. Therefore, when they do watch, an advertiser is likely to spend more money to get them to open their limited wallets.

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