Late Night TV Ratings For June 17-21, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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June 27th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

 

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON JUMP 14% VS. THE SAME WEEK LAST YEAR IN VIEWERS 18-49 AND DELIVER SLOT WINS FOR THE LATE-NIGHT WEEK OF JUNE 17-21

Jay Tops All Time-Period Competition in Total Viewers While Jimmy Delivers Bigger Audiences Than ‘Late Late Show’ and ‘Nightline’ Head to Head in Every Key Category

For the Second Quarter to Date, ‘Tonight’ is Up 7% in Viewers 18-49 vs. Last Year and ‘Late Night’ is Up 6%

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — June 27, 2013 — NBC’s late-night lineup has delivered hefty gains versus the same week last year, with “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" jumping by 14% each versus the year-ago week in viewers 18-49.

Tonight Show” scored a decisive win over all time-slot competition for the week of June 17-21 in total viewers in an atypical week in which Wednesday NBC telecasts were excluded due to an NHL overrun. ABC’s Tuesday and Thursday shows were delayed by high-rated NBA Finals coverage and the remainder of the week for “Jimmy Kimmel Live” was programmed with encores. Despite ABC’s significant NBA boost, “Tonight” tied “Kimmel” in 18-49 rating (0.9 each) and outscored “Kimmel” in adults 25-54 (1.2 vs. 1.0) and total viewers (3.7 million vs. 2.5 million). Jay also delivered bigger audiences than CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” in every key ratings category.

At 12:35 a.m. ET, "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" delivered bigger audiences than CBS's "Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson," as well as ABC's "Nightline" in their head-to-head half-hour, in all key categories -- adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

Versus the same week last year, Jay was up 14% in viewers 18-49 (1.084 million vs. 954,000), up 25% in viewers 18-34 (315,000 vs. 253,000) and up 6% in total viewers (3.637 million vs. 3.443 million). Jimmy Fallon scored gains versus the same week last year of 14% in viewers 18-49 (658,000 vs. 578,000), 27% in viewers 25-54 (830,000 vs. 653,000) and 10% in total viewers (1.756 million vs. 1.594 million).

Both Jay and Jimmy are generating growth 12 weeks into the second quarter of 2013, with Jay up versus one year ago by 7% in viewers 18-49 (with 1.075 million vs. 1.001 million), up 10% in viewers 18-34 (344,000 vs. 313,000) and up 1% in total viewers (3.553 million vs. 3.507 million), while Jimmy is up for the second quarter by 6% in viewers 18-49 (702,000 vs. 662,000), 16% in viewers 18-34 (294,000 vs. 254,000) and 6% in total viewers (1.775 million vs. 1.676 million).

Jay has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Show" for the last 31 weeks in a row and topped "Kimmel" for 21 of their 24 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Jay has out-delivered "Late Show" for 35 weeks in a row and "Kimmel" for 24 of 24 weeks.

Jimmy Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Late Show" for 36 of the last 37 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 33 of the last 35 weeks. Versus "Nightline" in their head-to-head half-hour, Jimmy has out-delivered the ABC series for 24 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 19 of the last 21 weeks in total viewers.

WEEKLY AVERAGES

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of June 17-21.  Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted.  Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 3 share*

CBS “Late Show,” 0.5/2*

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.9/4*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.5/3*

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3*

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.3/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2*

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers*

CBS “Late Show,” 2.6 million viewers*

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.5 million viewers*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers*

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.8 million viewers*

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.3 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers*

* Wednesday NBC results are excluded due to a hockey overrun. Tuesday and Thursday ABC programs were delayed by basketball overruns and Monday, Wednesday and Friday “Kimmel” telecasts were encores. Friday’s “Late Show” was an encore.

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

** Since January 8.

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF JUNE 17-21

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.5

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.3***

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.3 with encore telecasts

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.5

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m.  “The Daily Show,” 1.2 million

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.8 million***

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.6 million with encore telecasts

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.0 million

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.3 million

*** Monday and Tuesday telecasts of “The Colbert Report” were encores.

 
  • Brad

    No worries. I try to leave my emotions out of my late night discussions but of course, you can’t always help it.

    Nothing in particular. Just that his sketches and remotes are one of a kind.

    As a musician, you have two choices when playing in a group or at an open mic night. You either cover a song or write your own song. Both have pros and cons. One is already written out for you while the other is 100% up to you. With hard work and practice, one can have themselves a nice cover. The same work ethnic for a new song does not have the same results. They typical fall under sink or swim. This is why Conan has trouble with the start of any show. There’s no knowing whether his bits will be successful or not. It is risky business but when it’s a hit, it’s a hit. Conan could’ve took the easier road and been that cover band kind of comedian but he didn’t.

    Again, nothing wrong with what Leno did. There’s only been a six Tonigh Show hosts over the past 60 years so he obvious has talents, but the point is Leno played it safe. He gave the people the things he and they knew would be a hit.

  • Gary Middleton

    Nobody in the history of late night was more of a ‘cover band’ than Johnny Carson. His signature bit came from Steve Allen. His signature look came from Jack Benny.

    Brad, your assessment sounds right but I will say Leno brought one big new thing to the proceedings. He was the first to attempt, and succeed with, a form of actual stand up in a nightly monologue. Rather than purely set up, punchline, all in the same intonation with the clear implication that you’re reading someone else’s work with some detachment. Jay would commit to the material, become characters when doing them, tag them with multiple punchlines as a club comic would. The degree of difficulty on that is extremely high.

    I can’t recall but have to believe that Joan Rivers attempted that on Fox in 1987 (what else would she have done in a monologue), but did not succeed. Her range was a bit less, her style far more specific to her.

  • Gary Middleton

    Monte, you’re certainly right that ‘average Joe’ is a strange characterization of Conan. His dad was a professor of medicine at Harvard, mom a partner in a Boston law firm.

    I think part of his success is *not* trying to pass himself off as an average Joe. Very willing to turn his show into a comedy graduate course.

  • Monte Cristo

    @brad,

    it is very possible that obrien tried something new in his show, but just how didn’t catch on. But it’s ok. Anybody who has the audacity to push the boundaries deserves recognition. Who knows, maybe 30 years from now, when culture changes, some future generation comedian rediscovers obrien’s sketches and blows up, obrien may be regarded as one of the greatest of all time.

    However whoever says obrien, as of now, belongs to the same statement as johnny carson in TV history needs to get his/her brain checked. i mean, fanboi (thank you sandigo, i learnt the word from you) is one thing, but show some humility and common sense.

    i never had a chance to watch carson since he retired before i came to US as a graduate student. and i agree with those who believe he won’t have that dominance had he lived in this day and age. however there is no denial he was an icon in his era and a giant influence on younger comedians. Obrien, right now can hardly bested stewart, let alone letterman and leno, and the jury is still out whether he is better than kimmel and fallon.

  • Monte Cristo

    @middleton,

    “Rather than purely set up, punchline, all in the same intonation with the clear implication that you’re reading someone else’s work with some detachment”

    Thank you for providing the words i have been looking. This is exactly the impression i have for obrien’s and fallon’s monologue.

    here is my summary of obrien’s delivery routine:

    1. reads the set up from the cue card
    2. pauses, opens his arms, and scans the audience
    3. folds his hands
    4. “Yeah, yeah” (funny thing is 90% of time it is two Yeah’s, the other 10% is one Yeah, and you know the punchline is coming)
    5. stares into the cue card and reads the punchline with the same intonation
    6. at the end of the punchline, lowers his chin, raises his eyebrows, and stares into the camera and pauses for a second.
    7. then from time to time makes some comical facial gesture and robo moves.

    is that accurate?

  • Gary Middleton

    Sounds about right, and I’m sure all the hosts have a set of tics and gestures that we see repeatedly. Conan’s in an unusual category there because he’s really doing a parody of a monologue. Dovetails with his assertion in interviews that he doesn’t like jokes.

    Which puts his monologue in a bit of a tough spot, because after awhile people think ‘if you don’t like jokes, stop doing them.’ A few of his fans here have expressed the view that he should ditch the monologue. Some articles have noted the logical disconnect of acting like you’re being forced to do jokes when it’s a show you created and produce and own. One did a pretty good job of making the case that it’s the whole problem with the TBS show: the narrative that Conan was kind of an inmate running the asylum makes less sense when you own the asylum.

    My take on Fallon is he is very much willing to break the one-intonation, set-up/punchline model. He has a soft-spoken kind of delivery style that might be misinterpreted as a lack of enthusiasm or confidence, but I believe he will be able to bridge that divide.

  • Brad

    “My take on Fallon is he is very much willing to break the one-intonation, set-up/punchline model. He has a soft-spoken kind of delivery style that might be misinterpreted as a lack of enthusiasm or confidence, but I believe he will be able to bridge that divide.”

    I see it as a lack of enthusiasm. I don’t understand why he’s so dry when reading the jokes on the cue card. What is the purpose of being soft-spoken in the monologue when you run a show that is suppose to sell fun. I think it is wrong for the show. He should take notes from Leno in the late 90′s, early 00′s when he was like a jolly Santa Claus handing out jokes like candy. Fallon should be more like that.

  • Diana Santiago

    Monte Cristo, if you are going to talk about me, at least write my name correctly.

    If Conan O’Brien cannot be mentioned on the same statement as Johnny Carson, then neither Jay Leno.

    Carson, Letterman, Leno, O’Brien: all of them are already part of America Late Night Television History, even though NBC and the Jay fanbois want to erase Conan’s name from the record.

  • Gary Middleton

    For those who can’t get enough of the 2010 debate, the website “newsfromme” (dot com) has just begun a series. The site’s author has invited readers to send in their explanation of what Jay supposedly did wrong, and then the author provides a rebuttal.

  • Monte Cristo

    santiago, this is your pattern: you can’t launch any credible rebuttal to any of the points myself, richard, gary have raised, so what do you do? change gear and come up with two new blatant fabrications:

    1. “If Conan O’Brien cannot be mentioned on the same statement as Johnny Carson, then neither Jay Leno.”

    sweetheart, name one leno fan on this web site who has said something even remotely like “leno is in the same sentence as johnny carson”. hey even Neal is not that delusional as you are.

    2. “Carson, Letterman, Leno, O’Brien: all of them are already part of America Late Night Television History, even though NBC and the Jay fanbois want to erase Conan’s name from the record.”

    first of all, that was not your original word: what you said about the history book is, and i quote:

    “Where does Conan O’Brien get mentioned in the same sentence as Johnny Carson?

    In TV history.”

    so can you say on record: that you truly believe obrien is in the same sentence as johny carson in tv history?

    second, obrien was the TNS host for seven months, it is in the history book, for better or worse. he was the host of late night for 16 years, it is in the history book. Who in the leno fanbase denies that? and what has NBC done to erase the record?

    these childish claims at best, only show how desperate you are trying to defend obrien. and in my opinion it doesn’t bode well.

    and i find it’s impossible to bring a closure to a conversation with you because your posts have no substance other than hatred towards leno and his fans (not any individual but the whole leno fanbois). i indulge myself to reply to you this one more time, and i am sure a lot of readers are tired of the nagging between us.

  • Brad

    NBC won’t acknowledge Conan and his exsistence. They never mention him in the latest press releases. They never accept the fact that he took over for Leno briefly or that anyone should be worry about the Leno and Fallon transition not going smoothly.

    I’m done arguing about it all. But I just make it clear that a broad appeal is simply that, a broad appeal. It does not mean you have the most influence on something. McDonalds has a broad appeal but they have no way contributed to high quality food or changing the landscape of high quality food. There is no chefs who aspire to be a McDonalds cook. However, McDonalds is the most popular restaurant in the world. Leno is that McDonalds (or Burger King in Kimmel’s eyes).

  • Richard

    Diana Santiago wrote:

    “…. Jay fanbois ….”

    Using a gay slang as an insult. Way to go, Diana. Thank you for showing your true colors.

  • Richard

    Brad, I didnt realize the masturbating bear was a sign of high comedic quality.

  • Brad

    High in innovation. Not high in intellect. The amount of ridiculousness Conan has pumped into his show is something only seen in cartoons, not live action skits. Conan essentially brought Saturday Night Live into talk shows. That’s pretty cool.

    Not to speak for Diana but I thought “fanbois” was just a misspell of fanboys. But either way the few definitions I found of a “fanboi” is one who loves a brand no matter what. An example being Star Wars franchise or a specific car brand. Blindingly believing they can do no wrong. Having trouble finding it used as a gay slang.

  • Gary Middleton

    “NBC won’t acknowledge Conan and his exsistence. They never mention him in the latest press releases.”

    He is mentioned in every one of their press releases. He’s in the one at the top of this page.

    The network that never mentions Conan in its press releases is TBS.

  • Richard

    Great response Gary

  • Brad

    They mention him in the form of ratings. Never “this week, the former host of The Tonight Show, Conan O’Brien, got a 0.4 in the ratings over on TBS, a Time Warner station” and then start analyzing the ratings. The press simply stats his and the rest of the ratings on cable for late night.

    I don’t know what TBS is doing in their press releases when it comes to CONAN but I assume all is well if they keep on renewing Conan O’Brien’s contract. I wouldn’t be surprised at all if TBS just wants Conan for his Conanco production company and all the shows they produce for them.

  • Gary Middleton

    “They mention him in the form of ratings. Never “this week, the former host of The Tonight Show, Conan O’Brien, got a 0.4 in the ratings over on TBS, a Time Warner station” and then start analyzing the ratings.”

    Must be a Stalin-esque plot.

  • Monte Cristo

    @Brad,

    so do you think NBC should also mention letterman as such in the release: “Dave letterman, the former late night host of NBC…”?

  • Monte Cristo

    @Brad,

    or “Jimmy Kimmel, the former host of Comedy central…” that’s weird, don’t you agree?

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