Late Night TV Ratings For June 24-28, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

Written By

July 5th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

 

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON RULE THE SECOND QUARTER VS. ABC AND CBS SLOT RIVALS, WINNING ALL KEY MEASURES AND STRETCHING THEIR LEADS VS. PRIOR QUARTERS

Jay and Jimmy Are Up Across the Board vs. the Year-Ago Quarter, Generating Their Biggest 18-49 Audiences in the Last Five Quarters

Jay and Jimmy Deliver Their Biggest Second-Quarter 18-49 Margins Over ‘Late Show’ and ‘Late Late Show’ in Four Years

‘Tonight’ and ‘Late Night’ Stretch Their Leads vs. ABC’s ‘Kimmel’ and ‘Nightline’ vs. First-Quarter Margins

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — July 5, 2013 — NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" have dominated the second quarter of 2013 over the ABC and CBS time-period competition, topping them in every key ratings category and with increased margins of victory versus the prior quarter and year-ago quarter in adults 18-49 and total viewers.

Jay and Jimmy are up across the board versus their results for the second quarter of 2012, delivering bigger audiences in every key measure – adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

“Tonight” and “Late Night” generated their biggest 18-49 audiences (1.080 million for Jay, 701,000 for Jimmy) in five quarters, since the first quarter of 2012. In total viewers, it’s the biggest quarter for Jay (3.6 million) in five quarters and “Late Night’s” biggest (1.8 million) in six quarters, since the fourth quarter of 2011.

“Tonight” and “Late Night” earned their biggest second-quarter margins over CBS’s “Late Show” and “Late Late Show” respectively in four years, since 2009. Jay led “Late Show” by a 39% margin in 18-49 viewers (1.080 million vs. 777,000), up from 11% last year, and Jimmy topped “Late Late Show” by 43% (701,000 vs. 491,000), up from the year-ago 26%. In total viewers, it’s the biggest margin for “Tonight” over “Late Show” (+29%, 3.6 million vs. 2.8 million) in four years and the biggest second-quarter lead for Jimmy Fallon over “Late Late Show” (+28%, 1.8 million vs. 1.4 million) in the five years Jimmy has hosted “Late Night.”

“Tonight” also increased its margins over ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” versus their only prior quarter of head-to-head competition in the hour, the first quarter of 2013. For the second quarter, Jay outscored “Kimmel” by 22% in 18-49 viewers (1.080 million vs. 885,000), up from a 9% margin in the first quarter. In total viewers, “Tonight” increased its lead to 44% (3.6 million vs. 2.5 million), up from 34% in the first quarter.

Jimmy Fallon likewise pulled away from ABC’s “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour from 12:30-1 a.m. ET. In the second quarter, Jimmy prevailed over “Nightline” by 48% in viewers 18-49 (752,000 vs. 508,000), up from 30% in the first quarter, and in total viewers, the “Late Night” edge grew to 23% (1.9 million vs. 1.6 million from 12:30-1 a.m.), up from 15% in the first quarter.

Versus the second quarter of 2012, Jay is up 8% in 18-49 viewers (1.080 million vs. 999,000), up 12% in 18-34 viewers (346,000 vs. 308,000) and up 2% in total viewers (3.6 million vs. 3.5 million). Jimmy is up 6% in 18-49 viewers (701,000 vs. 660,000), up 16% in 18-34 viewers (295,000 vs. 255,000) and up 6% in total viewers (1.8 million vs. 1.7 million).

Jay has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Show" for the last 32 weeks in a row and topped "Kimmel" for 22 of their 25 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Jay has out-delivered "Late Show" for 36 weeks in a row and "Kimmel" for 25 of 25 weeks.

Jimmy Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Late Show" for 37 of the last 38 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 34 of the last 36 weeks. Versus "Nightline" in their head-to-head half-hour, Jimmy has out-delivered the ABC series for 25 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 20 of the last 22 weeks in total viewers.

WEEKLY AVERAGES

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of June 24-28.  Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted.  Second-quarter and Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 4 share*

CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3*

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/3*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3 with encore telecasts*

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2 with encore telecasts *

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.7 million viewers*

CBS “Late Show,” 2.8 million viewers*

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.3 million viewers*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.5 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers with encore telecasts *

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.3 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers with encore telecasts *

* Monday NBC results are excluded due to a hockey overrun. Friday’s “Late Show” and “Kimmel” were encores.

SECOND QUARTER 2013

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 4 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.6/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 2.8 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.5 million viewers

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.8 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

** Since January 8.

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF JUNE 24-28

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.6

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.5

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m.  “The Daily Show,” 1.4 million

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.1 million

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.9 million

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.1 million

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

###

 

 
  • Gary Middleton

    “Speaking of Conan again, anyone know why TBS never mentions Conan in its press releases anymore?”

    Richard, I would imagine there wasn’t much to say since he wasn’t beating anybody in any category. Maybe talking about his ratings was just calling attention to it.

    If you’re keeping a guy for reasons other than ratings (original programming gets you more cable company remittances, better ad dollars for non-syndicated fare, online content, whatever), then it makes sense not to talk about ratings.

  • Brad

    I hear you. Essentially advertisers feel like they’ve already got the best out of Jay Leno’s viewers after all these years. That it isn’t worth advertising these guys anymore. It is like a pond full of fish but they aren’t biting. Time to move.

  • Brad

    But doesn’t Conan skew young? I remember them advertisers how he’s in with the 18-34 year olds much like Kimmel is. Still a hard sale as it is the only thing TBS can brag about with Conan. You want to brag about something. Not give a lesson or talk down to the readers about what’s important in viewership.

  • Gary Middleton

    Brad, let’s say you only have 4 viewers and 3 of them are 18-34. That would give you the best 18-34 skew in late night. Youngest “median age”, as TBS used to say a lot. But you wouldn’t be beating anybody in any category, including 18-34.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Essentially advertisers feel like they’ve already got the best out of Jay Leno’s viewers after all these years.”

    What a rural purge scenario really means is Fallon’s viewers might have more money, and also be in geographical locations that make it easier to buy the advertiser’s product. Like if a film opening is advertised, it’s better if the viewer lives close to a cinema complex and willing to pay full price.

  • Gary Middleton

    Last week’s 10 pm averages:

    CBS: 1.42
    NBC: 1.4 (excludes Monday)
    ABC: 1.0

    CBS has a very big hit on its hands Monday nights.

  • anonymous

    From Broadcasting and Cable:

    Ad Buyers Processing NBC Late Night Shift
    April 3, 2013

    Reactions to NBC’s move to finalize the passing of the Tonight baton in early 2014 from Jay Leno to Jimmy Fallon were still filtering in Wednesday. But at least one prominent buyer landed squarely in the negative column.

    “I think it’s a bad move for NBC to do this now,” says Billie Gold, VP of research and programming at media agency Carat. “They should have waited till the primetime schedule was rebuilt. They’ve got a lot of holes to fill.” She added, “Advertisers see a lot of turmoil at NBC right now. It’s the wrong time to shake things up.”

    Gold said the late night announcement came just after NBC held a pre-upfront development meeting for media buyers. NBC Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt didn’t mention the change during the meeting. “Not a word,” Gold said. “You would think if they were proud of this, it would have come up.”
    ……………….

    Campanelli says the Fallon announcement will make buying the Tonight show a challenge. “We [buyers] will need to factor our projects for Fallon’s success into our upfront buying decisions,” he says. “I would assume NBC will sell a Tonight show ratings estimate for the year regardless of host. But more than likely, Fallon will end up with a lower rating once things settle in post Olympics push. That will likely lead to some under-delivery issues, further tightening the day part for NBC.”

    Late night, increasingly, is a trophy asset and not a profit center, certainly compared with the days when Johnny Carson drew tens of millions of viewers a night. According to data from Kantar Media, ad revenue for Tonight has fallen from $255 million in 2007 to $146 million in 2012. Even so, the stability and brand pedigree of late night franchises against a backdrop of constant change in the television business continue to make them desirable properties for media companies.

    Gold says she understands why NBC wants to make this change. “They want to reach a new generation of 18 to 49 year olds,” she said. “But Leno wins the time period, and I don’t know if Fallon will be able to beat [ABC’s] Jimmy Kimmel.”

  • anonymous

    “Fallon’s viewers might have more money, and also be in geographical locations that make it easier to buy the advertiser’s product. Like if a film opening is advertised, it’s better if the viewer lives close to a cinema complex and willing to pay full price.”

    Newsflash — this IS the 21st century. People living in Kansas do have movie theatres, do have auto dealerships, do have shopping malls, do have Walmarts.

    Typical person living in Kansas vs. typical person living in New York City:

    Lives in a house with land that need to be maintained vs. lives in a cramped apartment with no room for anything.

    Owns a car vs. only uses the subway.

    Has disposable income because the cost of living is cheap vs. do you know how much rent is here?

  • Richard

    “Richard, I would imagine there wasn’t much to say since he wasn’t beating anybody in any category. Maybe talking about his ratings was just calling attention to it.

    If you’re keeping a guy for reasons other than ratings (original programming gets you more cable company remittances, better ad dollars for non-syndicated fare, online content, whatever), then it makes sense not to talk about ratings.”

    Conan’s fame has helped put TBS on the map and this has meant more exposure and more money for the channel, even if Conan’s show is not much of a hit.

    But I just wonder how much longer can TBS keep doing this (using Conan as their trophy) before the mainstream media starts noticing that no one is watching his show.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Newsflash — this IS the 21st century. People living in Kansas do have movie theatres, do have auto dealerships, do have shopping malls, do have Walmarts.”

    Job growth is also much greater in ‘flyover’ areas thanks to a massive boom in agriculture and shale energy.

    But if you’re advertising that movie opening, you probably still want the cities. It isn’t Kansas vs. NY. For all we know, Fallon does better in Kansas City and Leno does better in Little Falls, NY. The question is who has easier access to the product. Logically, the chance of proximity for most things is probably better in more densely populated areas.

    Who has more disposable income? I don’t know, Leno’s viewers might have less than Fallon’s no matter where they are. Perhaps Leno has the NYC cab driver and Fallon has the Topeka veterinarian. Or veterinarian’s 22 year old kid with way too big of an allowance. We don’t know, but NBC has reasons for doing this.

    The shows with the most affluent audiences- Mad Men, 30 Rock, Seinfeld in the early going, all of CNBC’s day- seem to be the ones set in places like NYC. I have no dog in this hunt, it just sounds to me like there’s more affluence there. Maybe just more of everything there.

  • Gary Middleton

    “But I just wonder how much longer can TBS keep doing this (using Conan as their trophy) before the mainstream media starts noticing that no one is watching his show.”

    The two year renewal answered that question: a long time.

    Might not have been about a trophy at all. Someone posted an article saying some things that were quite convincing to me, especially:

    -cable companies will pay more to channels with a certain amount of original programming

    -advertisers will pay as much as double(!) for a viewer of an original show than syndicated because they tend to be more engaged

    That was the first time I got convinced that the Conan deal might actually be a bottom line decision.

  • Brad

    “Newsflash — this IS the 21st century. People living in Kansas do have movie theatres, do have auto dealerships, do have shopping malls, do have Walmarts.”

    A quick example of how things are different in Kansas then they are on the coast is some brands don’t make their way to the certain of the country. I’m sure you or anybody in Kansas would be hard-pressed to find a Volvo in the area. They just aren’t found in that region of the country. This is why I see Volvo ads on Letterman because Letterman is popular on the coasts which are where Volvos are typically found. However, it seems as though American cars like Ford (although not 100% American anymore) would be a better fit on Leno as Leno has a broad range of geographical ratings. In a country where nearly anyone from anywhere needs a car, there is no need to be geographically specific with your advertising.

  • Brad

    “Conan’s fame has helped put TBS on the map and this has meant more exposure and more money for the channel, even if Conan’s show is not much of a hit.

    But I just wonder how much longer can TBS keep doing this (using Conan as their trophy) before the mainstream media starts noticing that no one is watching his show.”

    I wondered the same thing after the first extension. It seems sort of obvious that the relationship Conan has with TBS is a temporary one. However, getting tied into Time Warner Cable by producing multiple shows for them really helps make his case that he deserves to stay. Conan is also very willing to incorporate in-show advertising in order to keep the show afloat. We’ll see how things by the end of Conan’s latest extension to Nov. 2015.

  • anonymous

    Things we know about ad rates that can be supported by reputable sources on the internet:

    Broadcast network ads are more valuable (costs more to purchase) than cable ads.

    Original programs get more ad dollars than syndicated reruns.

    Entertainment programs get better ad rates than news programs.

    Any other statements thrown about on this thread are just attempts by people who want to talk down Leno and his fans.

    Ask yourself this question — If Kimmel was getting better ad rates per 30 second spot than Leno, wouldn’t you be hearing it trumpeted in every ABC late-night press release?

  • anonymous

    @Brad — err… there are Volvo dealerships in Kansas… this ain’t Little House on the Prairie.

    A recent two-year study from Strategic Vision, which compiled data from new car buyers, lists the top 5 cars that liberals and conservatives drive:

    The top five cars for liberals were:

    1. Honda Civic (hybrid)
    2. Volvo C30
    3. Nissan Leaf
    4. Acura TSX
    5. Ford Fiesta

    The top five cars for conservatives were:

    1. Ford Mustang (convertible)
    2. Audi A8
    3. Mercedes GL
    4. Ford Expedition
    5. Ford F150

  • Brad

    Sorry. I was just advised to never go cross country in my older Volvo (1997 Volvo 850 sedan for anyone interested) because I would be hard pressed to find parts for it. Seems like that isn’t true at all. My apologies.

    Just so we are all on the same page, it is all about disposable income, not simply how much somebody makes. You want target those with the first, not the later.

    “Broadcast network ads are more valuable (costs more to purchase) than cable ads.”

    I’m not trying to argue this, I can see this being true, but why? Because broadcast channels have been around for decades? Because everybody has the ability to watch the station (even if they aren’t currently watching it)?

  • Laurence Glavin

    Remember, from their disposable income, a significant number of Kansans are subject to beeing fleeced by pastors and priests up to ten per cent or more of their money. That leaves less for the parishioners, while the men of the cloth buy Rolices (plural of Rolex?), Lobster Thermidor dinners, and place any extraneous moolah in tax havens.

  • anonymous

    tvbythenumbers Bill Gorman:

    “Here’s the first thing I have read that explains why broadcast TV ad CPMs (cost per thousand viewers) have remained higher than cable TV CPMs. Cable viewers tend to be heavy TV viewers overall and are therefore cheaper/easier to reach. Broadcast TV has more light viewers who are harder (and therefore more expensive) to reach.”

  • Gary Middleton

    “Any other statements thrown about on this thread are just attempts by people who want to talk down Leno and his fans.”

    So according to Anonymous, there are 4 principles of advertising known to the world and no others. Geographically-based target marketing and paying more for affluence are among the ones that don’t exist.

    That’s really silly.

  • anonymous

    “So according to Anonymous, there are 4 principles of advertising known to the world and no others. Geographically-based target marketing and paying more for affluence are among the ones that don’t exist.”

    Strawman argument.

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