Late Night TV Ratings For June 24-28, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

Written By

July 5th, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

 

JAY LENO AND JIMMY FALLON RULE THE SECOND QUARTER VS. ABC AND CBS SLOT RIVALS, WINNING ALL KEY MEASURES AND STRETCHING THEIR LEADS VS. PRIOR QUARTERS

Jay and Jimmy Are Up Across the Board vs. the Year-Ago Quarter, Generating Their Biggest 18-49 Audiences in the Last Five Quarters

Jay and Jimmy Deliver Their Biggest Second-Quarter 18-49 Margins Over ‘Late Show’ and ‘Late Late Show’ in Four Years

‘Tonight’ and ‘Late Night’ Stretch Their Leads vs. ABC’s ‘Kimmel’ and ‘Nightline’ vs. First-Quarter Margins

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — July 5, 2013 — NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and "Late Night with Jimmy Fallon" have dominated the second quarter of 2013 over the ABC and CBS time-period competition, topping them in every key ratings category and with increased margins of victory versus the prior quarter and year-ago quarter in adults 18-49 and total viewers.

Jay and Jimmy are up across the board versus their results for the second quarter of 2012, delivering bigger audiences in every key measure – adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

“Tonight” and “Late Night” generated their biggest 18-49 audiences (1.080 million for Jay, 701,000 for Jimmy) in five quarters, since the first quarter of 2012. In total viewers, it’s the biggest quarter for Jay (3.6 million) in five quarters and “Late Night’s” biggest (1.8 million) in six quarters, since the fourth quarter of 2011.

“Tonight” and “Late Night” earned their biggest second-quarter margins over CBS’s “Late Show” and “Late Late Show” respectively in four years, since 2009. Jay led “Late Show” by a 39% margin in 18-49 viewers (1.080 million vs. 777,000), up from 11% last year, and Jimmy topped “Late Late Show” by 43% (701,000 vs. 491,000), up from the year-ago 26%. In total viewers, it’s the biggest margin for “Tonight” over “Late Show” (+29%, 3.6 million vs. 2.8 million) in four years and the biggest second-quarter lead for Jimmy Fallon over “Late Late Show” (+28%, 1.8 million vs. 1.4 million) in the five years Jimmy has hosted “Late Night.”

“Tonight” also increased its margins over ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” versus their only prior quarter of head-to-head competition in the hour, the first quarter of 2013. For the second quarter, Jay outscored “Kimmel” by 22% in 18-49 viewers (1.080 million vs. 885,000), up from a 9% margin in the first quarter. In total viewers, “Tonight” increased its lead to 44% (3.6 million vs. 2.5 million), up from 34% in the first quarter.

Jimmy Fallon likewise pulled away from ABC’s “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour from 12:30-1 a.m. ET. In the second quarter, Jimmy prevailed over “Nightline” by 48% in viewers 18-49 (752,000 vs. 508,000), up from 30% in the first quarter, and in total viewers, the “Late Night” edge grew to 23% (1.9 million vs. 1.6 million from 12:30-1 a.m.), up from 15% in the first quarter.

Versus the second quarter of 2012, Jay is up 8% in 18-49 viewers (1.080 million vs. 999,000), up 12% in 18-34 viewers (346,000 vs. 308,000) and up 2% in total viewers (3.6 million vs. 3.5 million). Jimmy is up 6% in 18-49 viewers (701,000 vs. 660,000), up 16% in 18-34 viewers (295,000 vs. 255,000) and up 6% in total viewers (1.8 million vs. 1.7 million).

Jay has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Show" for the last 32 weeks in a row and topped "Kimmel" for 22 of their 25 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Jay has out-delivered "Late Show" for 36 weeks in a row and "Kimmel" for 25 of 25 weeks.

Jimmy Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than "Late Late Show" for 37 of the last 38 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 34 of the last 36 weeks. Versus "Nightline" in their head-to-head half-hour, Jimmy has out-delivered the ABC series for 25 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 20 of the last 22 weeks in total viewers.

WEEKLY AVERAGES

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of June 24-28.  Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted.  Second-quarter and Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 4 share*

CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3*

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.6/3*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3 with encore telecasts*

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2 with encore telecasts *

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.7 million viewers*

CBS “Late Show,” 2.8 million viewers*

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.3 million viewers*

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.5 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers with encore telecasts *

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.3 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers with encore telecasts *

* Monday NBC results are excluded due to a hockey overrun. Friday’s “Late Show” and “Kimmel” were encores.

SECOND QUARTER 2013

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 4 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.6/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 2.8 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.5 million viewers

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.8 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share

CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3

ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3

CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers

CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers

ABC “Kimmel,” 2.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET

ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET

NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers

CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET

NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

** Since January 8.

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF JUNE 24-28

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.6

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.5

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 0.9

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m.  “The Daily Show,” 1.4 million

Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.1 million

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.9 million

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.1 million

Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million

###

 

 
  • Gary Middleton

    “Ask yourself this question — If Kimmel was getting better ad rates per 30 second spot than Leno, wouldn’t you be hearing it trumpeted in every ABC late-night press release?”

    Not sure anyone has made that assertion here, or even implied it.

    But no, I don’t think it would be in a press release. Ad rates are not static, they are sold in various forms in various circumstances. Any quoted figure of your own ad rates would be an extreme estimation, let alone coming up with a figure for your competitor.

    Best they could do is try to leak a story like that to the media. But the media might or might not run with it, and might or might not agree with the figures.

  • Gary Middleton

    “‘So according to Anonymous, there are 4 principles of advertising known to the world and no others. Geographically-based target marketing and paying more for affluence are among the ones that don’t exist.’

    Strawman argument.”

    True. It was 3 principles, not 4.

    I stand corrected.

  • anonymous

    “Maybe there’s a lot more money to be made from a Fallon 0.7 than a Leno 0.85.”

    “Essentially advertisers feel like they’ve already got the best out of Jay Leno’s viewers after all these years. That it isn’t worth advertising these guys anymore. It is like a pond full of fish but they aren’t biting. Time to move.”

    “What a rural purge scenario really means is Fallon’s viewers might have more money, and also be in geographical locations that make it easier to buy the advertiser’s product.”

    Where are the sources to backup your statements. Show me a credible source that says Leno’s ad rates are less than any other talk show host’s.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Where are the sources to backup your statements. Show me a credible source that says Leno’s ad rates are less than any other talk show host’s.”

    Apparently the words ‘maybe’ and ‘might’ are among those unsupportable concepts to Anonymous.

  • Gary Middleton

    btw, there were several articles over the years claiming that Letterman’s billings were larger than Jay’s at various times when his ratings were way lower than Jay’s.

    But this shouldn’t be necessary for a supposition. There was a rural purge circa 1970. Leno is being removed for Fallon now. Networks have reasons for doing these things. We’re allowed to speculate on why that might be. Ad rates are a pretty reasonable place to start. These are businesses we’re talking about.

  • Gary Middleton

    ps, the 2nd statement you quoted was Brad’s, not mine. I disagreed with it.

  • Brad

    “Things we know about ad rates that can be supported by reputable sources on the internet:

    Broadcast network ads are more valuable (costs more to purchase) than cable ads.

    Original programs get more ad dollars than syndicated reruns.

    Entertainment programs get better ad rates than news programs.”

    Sounds like the very basics to marketing and advertising on television. We don’t disagree with the fact that some advertisers are interested in geographical marketing or the marketing towards a specific class, but there is no simple explanation to this. How do we know what shows target what areas? Hard to take in all the affliates’ ratings and determine where the show has the most success. I don’t care to figure this out. I just know Leno wins over the middle of the country.

  • Richard

    Brad, Gary and others… I think we talk so much about ratings, ad rates, etc. that soon we are going to be qualified to work for one of these late night shows.
    I know, wishful thinking on my part but hey, you never know…

  • Brad

    I backed out of my assumption that Jay’s viewer pool has been fished, though it would be interesting to find out if this could possibly be true. It isn’t a bad assumption, but no, I can’t confirm it being the right assumption. Just assumed 20 years of advertisement to the same fan base might not be what advertisers want.

    As for the Kimmel ad-rates, I am the one who keeps on talking it up though not as of late. I never said he makes more than Leno, I do know the ad-rates increases significantly for an 11:30 time slot that ABC told Nightline to get out of the way. All I know is that the ratings we see for ABC, which appear to be down from last year, does not mean that ABC is losing money at all. That I know for sure. Of course, rates change and we will only know how things pan out as time passes by.

    Also, why is it so hard for someone to figure out the ad rates, budget, and total revenue from a late night show? Could there at least be a good estimate?

  • Brad

    I would love to work on the business side of television or be a General Manager for a baseball team. Either would be a dream job for me. We’ll see though. Lol.

  • anonymous

    BROADCAST AND CABLE LATE NIGHT TALK SHOWS

    MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME – 2011

    “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” $78K
    “The Colbert Report” $73K
    “Chelsea Lately” $63K
    “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” $58K
    “The Late Show with David Letterman” $53K
    “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” $53K
    “Jimmy Kimmel Live” $53K
    “Conan” $53K
    “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” $48K
    “Lopez Tonight” $43K
    “The Mo’Nique Show” $33K

    Source: Nielsen Media Research, 2011 YTD

    Info found at tvbythenumbers.zap2it.com

  • Gary Middleton

    “Also, why is it so hard for someone to figure out the ad rates, budget, and total revenue from a late night show?”

    On all of those items, the common problem is these are not made public.

    But for ad rates, and even total revenue, you’ve got an additional complication. Just one illustration:

    Say ABC tries to sell an Oscars ad spot for a quarter of a million dollars, the client balks, and ABC says “we’ll thrown in 5 Kimmel spots” and the client says OK. How much of the revenue is attributable to Kimmel’s show? Unknowable, imo.

  • anonymous

    Tell me what product that is advertised nationally on the networks that you can’t buy if you live in Duluth, MN or Boise,ID or Meridian,MS?

  • anonymous

    “What a rural purge scenario really means is Fallon’s viewers might have more money…”

    “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” $58K median income. If Leno’s audience is mainly in the heartland, you can live very comfortably on $58K a year where the cost of living is relatively cheap.

    “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” $53K median income. If Fallon’s audience is mainly on the coasts (NYC and L.A.), I don’t know how far $53K a year will take you. And how much of Fallon’s audience is saddled with student loan debt?

  • Gary Middleton

    “Tell me what product that is advertised nationally on the networks that you can’t buy if you live in Duluth, MN or Boise,ID or Meridian,MS?”

    Dunkin Donuts.

  • Gary Middleton

    I think it’s no accident that all of the top 3 median income shows on that list end before midnight.

    People with jobs are far less likely to stay up to 1:30, so it’s very normal for the 12:30 shows to trail their 11:30 counterparts in median income. When Fallon moves to 11:30, his viewers’ median income will rise.

  • Brad

    Of course the viewers of the political comedy shows have the highest median average. That doesn’t shock me at all. However, Cheslea Handler being 3rd really shocked me. I can see why her show is doing so well with advertisers now. High female audience collecting a nice sum of money. I’m sure Macy, Victoria Secrets, and CoverGirl are enjoying their ads on her show.

    My father runs a newspaper and an interesting fact that comes up in our readers, or at least for weekly newspapers, is that females make up the majority of readers. I think females typically enjoy being apart of the local community in some way. Anyways, when the typical reader is in their 30’s or older, you realize you are advertisers to woman in charge of the households cash. The one who goes grocery shopping and buy her kids their clothes and what not. Guys typically aren’t the ones doing these kinds of activities, at least not in my community. It is quite interesting to think about. Anyways, you can see how people can taking the ratings and viewers/readers and have them be to your advantage.

  • Gary Middleton

    If Chelsea’s show ended at 1:30, she would not have been anywhere near 3rd.

    “I can see why her show is doing so well with advertisers now.”

    Keep in mind the limitations of median income as a guide. If you have 1 viewer and she makes 85 grand, you have the highest median income. But congratulations are not in order.

  • Monikka

    Richard said:

    “I think we talk so much about ratings, ad rates, etc. that soon we are going to be qualified to work for one of these late night shows.”

    They’d be better off hiring people who could actually write comedy.

  • Gary Middleton

    Most recent week’s 10 pm averages, excluding July 4th:

    NBC: 1.4
    CBS: 1.32
    ABC: 0.87

    Only ABC is dramatically lower than during the regular TV season.

© 2014 Tribune Digital Ventures