Late Night TV Ratings For July 22-26, 2013

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases,Weekly Late Night TV Ratings

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August 1st, 2013

To see past weeks' Late Night TV ratings information click here.

Via NBC's Press Release

‘THE Tonight Show,’ ‘LATE NIGHT’ CONTINUE DOMINANCE OVER ABC, CBS TIMESLOT COMPETITION FOR WEEK OF JULY 22-26

Jimmy Fallon Defeats Both Jimmy Kimmel, David Letterman in 18-34 Viewers Despite the Latter’s Earlier Start Times

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — Aug. 1, 2013 — NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” have dominated their broadcast time-period competition for the week of July 22-26, delivering bigger audiences than their ABC and CBS rivals in every key ratings category.

Both Leno and Kimmel bested their ABC and CBS late-night timeslot competitors in adults, men and women 18-34, 18-49 and 25-54, plus total viewers.

Note: Fallon was an encore on Tuesday, ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live” was in rebroadcasts for the full week and CBS’s “Late Show with David Letterman” aired an encore on Friday.

For the week, Fallon delivered more viewers 18-34 (251,000) than Letterman (231,000) and ABC’s week of “Kimmel” encores (179,000), despite those shows starting an hour earlier when viewership levels are significantly higher. Fallon also out-delivered both those 11:35 p.m. shows last week in men 18-34 and women 18-34.

Additionally, for a second straight week, Fallon delivered more viewers 18-49 than ABC’s week of “Kimmel” encores (613,000 vs. 568,000), marking the first two times “Late Night” has topped Kimmel in the category since the ABC series moved to an 11:35 start time in January.

Leno delivered his biggest 18-49 audience (1.081 million) and overall audience (3.562 million) in four weeks, since June 24-28. Fallon generated his second-biggest 18-49 audience (613,000) in five weeks, since the week of June 17-21, trailing over that span only the prior week’s average of 663,000.

At 1:35 a.m. ET, “Last Call with Carson Daly” jumped versus the same week last year by 13% in viewers 18-49 (to 363,000 from 322,000), by 34% in viewers 18-34 (165,000 vs. 123,000) and by 13% in total viewers (895,000 vs. 789,000).

For the third quarter to date, Leno is up 6% in 18-49 viewers (to 1.073 million vs. 1.009 million) and up 11% in 18-34 viewers (352,000 from 316,000). Fallon is up 6% in 18-49 viewers (643,000 vs. 609,000) and up 18% in 18-34 viewers (272,000 vs. 230,000).

Leno has now delivered bigger 18-49 audiences than “Late Show” for the last 36 weeks in a row and topped “Kimmel” for 26 of their 29 head-to-head weeks. In total viewers, Leno has out-delivered “Late Show” for 40 weeks in a row and “Kimmel” for 29 of 29 weeks.

Fallon has now generated bigger 18-49 audiences than “Late Late Show” for 41 of the last 42 weeks and prevailed in total viewers for 38 of the last 40 weeks. Versus “Nightline” in their head-to-head half-hour, Fallon has out-delivered the ABC series for 29 weeks in a row in viewers 18-49 and 24 of the last 26 weeks in total viewers.

Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted.  Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”

WEEKLY AVERAGES

(According to in-home viewing figures from Nielsen Media Research for the week of July 22-26. Ratings reflect “live plus same day” data from Nielsen Media Research unless otherwise noted.  Season-to-date figures are averages of “live plus seven day” data except for the two most recent weeks, which are “live plus same day.”)

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 0.9 rating, 4 share
CBS “Late Show,” 0.6/3 *
ABC “Kimmel,” 0.4/2 **

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET
ABC “Nightline,” 0.3/2

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3
CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers
CBS “Late Show,” 2.7 million viewers *

ABC “Kimmel,” 1.8 million viewers **

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET
ABC “Nightline,” 1.4 million viewers

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 1.6 million viewers
CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.4 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

* Tuesday’s “Late Night” and Friday’s “Late Show” were encores.

** “Jimmy Kimmel Live” was in encores all week.

SEASON TO DATE

ADULTS 18-49

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 0.8 rating, 3 share
CBS “Late Show,” 0.7/3
ABC “Kimmel,” 0.7/3**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET
ABC “Nightline,” 0.4/2**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 0.5/3
CBS “Late Late Show,” 0.4/2

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.3/2

TOTAL VIEWERS

11:35 p.m.-12:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Tonight,” 3.6 million viewers
CBS “Late Show,” 3.0 million viewers
ABC “Kimmel,” 2.5 million viewers**

12:35-1:05 a.m. ET
ABC “Nightline,” 1.6 million viewers**

12:35-1:35 a.m. ET
NBC “Late Night,” 1.7 million viewers
CBS “Late Late Show,” 1.5 million viewers

1:35-2:05 a.m. ET
NBC “Last Call,” 0.9 million viewers

** Since January 8.

SELECTED CABLE RESULTS, WEEK OF JULY 22-26

NATIONAL ADULT 18-49 RATING

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m. ET, “The Daily Show,” 0.6
Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 0.5

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.4

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 1.0
Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 0.6

Each adult 18-49 rating point equals 1.27 million viewers

TOTAL VIEWERS

Comedy Central, 11-11:30 p.m.  “The Daily Show,” 1.3 million viewers
Comedy Central, 11:30 p.m.-midnight ET, “The Colbert Report,” 1.2 million viewers

TBS, 11 p.m.-midnight, “Conan,” 0.9 million viewers

Adult Swim, 11:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. ET, 2.2 million viewers
Adult Swim, 12:30-1:30 a.m. ET, 1.4 million viewers

 

 
  • Richard

    @GARebelman
    “I have no idea where he could go but I am sure (you really think he is going to admit on air if he got phone calls or not?? ) he will find something because he hates vacations and retirement.”

    One key factor in his ratings popularity is that he has the most fun doing his show than any of the other late night hosts.

    I’m sure the other networks know this, and this is one reason I think he’s going to find something good when he leaves the show.

  • Brad

    Lol. I’d like him to stay on television but the more Gary, I, and others talk about the possibilities involving Leno, the more I think about that possibility of being on television (with a big show that is) less likely to happen.

  • Richard

    “Appears Jay offended Brad today or something :)”

    I know. Jay offends and does bad things to people.
    My car wouldn’t start last night. I was told it needs a new starter. I know Jay had something to do with this…

    lol ;)

  • Brad

    In my mind, hard workers deserves shows, not slackers. This is my everyone can see the rage I have for Letterman at times when I see Leno showed the exit and not Letterman regardless of each network’s “bullpen.” I’ve been watching Stephen Colbert a lot more as of late and the amount of intelligence and energy he puts into his show really makes me feel like he can be a network favorite for a talk show. He’s like Letterman and Fallon (and Stewart) rolled into one. Also, his interviews with Bryan Cranston and Elliot Spitzer were great.

    Spitzer Questions:
    “Given a position of this responsibility, should the job of comptroller go to someone who has show a modicum of ‘self-comp-trol,’” Mr. Colbert asked early on, drawing loud audience applause. “Why, why, why should the people trust you.”

    “Why do you want this job? Because before you had your fall from Grace–or whatever her name was–you were the governor of the state. You were the governor! Aren’t you at one and the same time both above and below this job?”

    And the best one of all…

    But Mr. Colbert wasn’t done. “Before we go, one last question,” he said. “You know, you’re leading in the polls. You could win this thing … Do you think that it seems that voters are more forgiving than they used to be? Do you think that signals progress for our country, or the slow decay of our moral values?”

    “Wow. Wow. That is a tough one,” replied Mr. Spitzer, looking unusually tongue-tied.

    “This ain’t Charlie Rose!” Mr. Colbert gloated, to no response. “Come back and tell me.” (He never pressed him for an answer)

    To me, Colbert is a winner.

    Article & Video:
    politicker dot com/2013/07/stephen-colbert-asks-eliot-spitzer-about-self-comptrol/

  • Gary Middleton

    “You can already see it happen with Kimmel booking guests days before they appear on Leno’s version of The Tonight Show.”

    I predicted that would be the case, Brad. But it simply hasn’t come true. It almost never happens.

    Jason Sudeikis next week is an extremely rare case. What you do still see, at least once or twice a week, is a recent Leno guest on Kimmel.

    But the ‘lame duck’ aspect probably shows itself a little via some big stars going on Kimmel instead of Leno. So what has really happened is Leno’s show stood its ground and said ‘we’ll take a less famous guest rather than cede our policy’. Unintended consequence: it likely has made for a better show.

  • Gary Middleton

    Kimmel will be alone with new episodes in mid-August. With Oprah one of the guests. Can he win the week?

  • Gary Middleton

    “I’m sure the other networks know this, and this is one reason I think he’s going to find something good when he leaves the show.”

    Richard, the problem is there are very few ‘good’ options for Jay. 11:30 on ABC, NBC, CBS are taken. 11 pm on Fox is hard to clear, plus Leno’s audience is very habitual and they watch the news at 11. And that’s about all there is out there of consequence for Jay Leno.

    So it’s effectively over and we get to see him be a guest again. Looking forward to that, he was once very good at it.

  • Brad

    I wouldn’t say Kimmel has won the booking war. I would say Kimmel has CREATED the current booking war. This is a big problem for NBC and Fallon right now. Leno goes away but all his guests are now on Kimmel and all Fallon will be doing is creating a booking war with Letterman. It is lose-lose to me until Letterman becomes a lame duck, though smart agents would advise to go on Fallon to build up a relationship BEFORE Letterman becomes announces his retirement which can be any year now.

  • GARebelman

    When I was at a restaurant last night they had Fox news on (why they always do? I have no idea) but they showed a clip from Jay’s monologue and his only for a laugh during Chris Wallace’s show.

    Take that at your will but I have already seem them defend that network “against NBC”

  • Nick

    I really don’t think any kind of booking war exists. It all comes down to scheduling. Maybe Jason Sudeikis wanted Leno on Wednesday, but Matt Damon was free only on Wednesday so they booked Jason on Friday instead. No one knows how or why guests are booked on what nights, and to think there’s some kind of a “booking war” is ludicrous. Bryan Cranston did Fallon yesterday, and he’s doing Leno on Monday – probably because he was in New York on Friday and will be in Los Angeles on Monday. It makes sense.

    Also, I don’t understand why people think Leno books less-famous guests. He has a ton of huge names coming up this week, including the one and only President of the United States, as well as Matt Damon, Robin Williams, Mark Cuban, and more. Not to mention in three weeks, his guests will include Senator John McCain (no wonder why FOX News loves Leno), Josh Duhamel, Rod Stewart, and Macklemore/Ryan Lewis. All huge names in their respective fields.

    Having both Obama and McCain on in the same month is pretty interesting, and also a great reason why a) FOX News is *supposedly* interested in Leno, and b) why middle American is drawn to this man. On what other late-night show would you see both of these men on in the same month? Or even a democrat and a republican politician on in the same month?

  • Nick

    Also, Seth Meyers will be on Fallon Monday night. Should be interested.

  • Gary Middleton

    “I really don’t think any kind of booking war exists.”

    100% guarantee that it does. As soon as Kimmel moved to 11:30, it was on.

    “It all comes down to scheduling. Maybe Jason Sudeikis wanted Leno on Wednesday, but Matt Damon was free only on Wednesday so they booked Jason on Friday instead.”

    It does not all come down to scheduling. Tonight’s policy has always been ‘no guests who just did Kimmel.’ And 99% of the time, they still adhere to it. The Sudeikis exception is interesting, because obviously they’ve passed on much bigger stars on the basis that they just did Kimmel.

  • Gary Middleton

    “Also, I don’t understand why people think Leno books less-famous guests. He has a ton of huge names coming up this week”

    The argument isn’t that he has no huge guests. It’s that he has fewer of them, and more lesser names than he would otherwise have, in order to maintain the current booking policy.

    Up to this point, nearly every single time you see a Jennifer Aniston, Harrison Ford, Justin Timberlake, etc. on Kimmel before seeing them on Leno, it means you’re not going to see them on Leno. And I’d say there are at least 200% more names on that list than there were when Kimmel was at midnight.

    A certain percentage of them weren’t going to do Leno anyway. And the rest would do Leno if not for the policy. “The rest” represents lots of big names. So instead of Justin Timberlake, you might get Meet The Press host David Gregory or Tim Allen.

  • Brad

    I remembered when Leno had Tim Allen on twice in two weeks during a time where Tim Allen had little to nothing going for him. Just saying.

    Still upset how NBC has practically given Kimmel the top guests in LA. It will be just him with the leading Late Night show. Conan, Handler, and Ferguson are definitely, definitely second to Kimmel. If Fallon thinks he is going to get better bookings in New York now that he is at 11:35, he has another thing coming. It won’t be that simple when going up against Letterman, the late night establishment in New York.

    Not to be a stickler but John McCain has been on Letterman’s show multiple times. However, you are right Nick. Leno plays fairly and is all about equal opportunity when it comes to politics. And I would agree with the Fox people that conservatives need someone who can spread jokes on Democrats and make the Republican Party more mainstream, more like able to the general public.

  • Richard

    “The argument isn’t that he has no huge guests. It’s that he has fewer of them, and more lesser names than he would otherwise have, in order to maintain the current booking policy.”

    With fewer top guests than his competition, and Jay still beats everyone. Truly remarkable.

  • Gary Middleton

    Richard, there was never a better control experiment on that than during the 2008 writers strike, when most A and B listers boycotted Leno. Dave had movie stars every night and Jay had a whole lot of animal acts. Leno still won easily.

  • Gary Middleton

    btw, I didn’t mean to say Jay has fewer big name guests than his competition (though often true). But significantly fewer big name guests than he used to have, and would otherwise still have, as a result of defending the booking policy.

  • kscottk11

    As for Leno booking big name guests and the booking policy, Leno and his show is far less dependent on A-List guests and a strong lead-in to keep his show’s ratings up, than the other shows.

  • GARebelman

    All this insistence on others that Jay has to have the strongest booking yet it takes a handful a year to beat Jay regardless of the guest. Pretty sad others others have to have supreme guests in the weakest half hour to boost anything up. Speaks volumes about their opening acts!

  • Brad

    You are right GAR. It does.

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