Bill Murray, The First Guest to Visit CBS' 'Late Show With David Letterman' Returns to Celebrate the Show's 20th Anniversary

Categories: Late Night TV Ratings,Network TV Press Releases

Written By

August 26th, 2013

David Letterman, Late Show

via press release:

BILL MURRAY, THE FIRST GUEST TO VISIT CBS’s “Late Show with DAVID LETTERMAN” WHEN IT PREMIERED AUGUST 30, 1993, RETURNS TO CELEBRATE THE SHOW’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY ON THE NETWORK, THURSDAY, AUGUST 29!

Bill Murray, the first guest to visit CBS’s Late Show with DAVID LETTERMAN when it premiered on August 30, 1993, reminisces with Letterman when the actor helps celebrate the Late Show’s 20 years on the CBS Television Network, Thursday, Aug. 29 (11:35 PM-12:37 AM, ET/PT).

Murray, who was not only the first guest on the Late Show when it premiered in 1993, but also the inaugural guest on Letterman’s “Late Night” show when it debuted in 1982, will make his 26th appearance on the CBS late night talk show.

As of August 29, 2013, the multiple Emmy Award-winning LATE SHOW with DAVID LETTERMAN will have broadcast 3,897 episodes and four primetime specials in its 20 years on CBS.  Since its debut on the Network on August 30, 1993, the critically-acclaimed show has been honored with nine Emmy Awards, including six for “Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Program,” and a staggering 73 Emmy nominations.

Over the past 20 years, the groundbreaking LATE SHOW has remained one of the funniest and most creative shows on television.  The broadcast, hosted by Letterman, a pioneer in the late night talk show field beginning with the 1982 premiere of his iconic “Late Night with David Letterman,” remains the longest running late night television host in history at 31 years and counting.  In addition to its numerous Emmy Awards, the LATE SHOW was named Program of the Year at the 1994 Television Critics Awards and, in 2012, Letterman received the Career Achievement Award from the TCA.  In December 2012, Letterman was an honoree at the prestigious “35th Annual Kennedy Center Honors,” which recognizes recipients for their lifetime contributions to American culture through the performing arts in dance, music, theater, opera, motion pictures and television.  Letterman was awarded the prestigious Johnny Carson Award for Comedic Excellence at Comedy Central’s first annual “The Comedy Awards” in March 2011.  He has won two American Comedy Awards as Funniest Male Performer in a Television Series and a Foundation Award from the International Radio and Television Society for his "extraordinary domi­nation in late-night television." Letterman was also honored as "Favorite Late Night Talk Show Host" at the 31st Annual People's Choice Awards in 2005.

The LATE SHOW with DAVID LETTERMAN is a production of Worldwide Pants Incorporated.  Barbara Gaines, Matt Roberts, Jude Brennan, Maria Pope, Eric Stangel, Justin Stangel and Rob Burnett are the executive producers.

 
  • Chris

    You have to think that CBS executives privately need to be starting to consider a successor for Letterman. How much longer will he go? After all, he’s now 66, which I believe is the same age that the late, great Johnny Carson was when he retired from NBC’s Tonight show back in 1992. (At 31 years and counting, Letterman has now actually surpassed Carson for longest late night tenure, when you combine his NBC and CBS runs.)

    With Jimmy Fallon (age 38) set to succeed Jay Leno (age 63) on Tonight next February, it seems pretty certain that NBC will skew a lot younger in that time slot than CBS will. It has to be something that CBS will have an eye on (no pun intended), you’d think. Also, since both Letterman and Fallon will be broadcasting from NYC, it stands to reason that a battle will probably ensue over booking guests. Which host are they more loyal to, and whose audience would they prefer to be in front of? Stay tuned.

  • AllOfHerTwist

    Chris You have to think that CBS executives privately need to be starting to consider a successor for Letterman

    Jerry Seinfeld? Louis CK? ;-) :-)

  • USAmerica1st

    Letterman’s gonna be hard to replace. Craig Ferguson, a niche comedian, will probably stay in his comfortable, successful slot, but he’s a possibility. Conan, as poetic justice? Louie Anderson or Drew Carey as wild cards? But yes, Seinfeld would be excellent, except he and all of the above, minus the youthful 50ish Conan, are approaching 60 themselves.

  • Ralph Hahn

    @Chris: >>> With Jimmy Fallon (age 38) set to succeed Jay Leno (age 63) on Tonight next February, it seems pretty certain that NBC will skew a lot younger in that time slot than CBS will. <<<

    That's what NBC said when Conan had taken "Tonight" away from Leno. NBC will burn out its younger talent when they fail to measure up to Leno's numbers.

    Letterman is now an angry old man who hates Republicans. He's not even pretending to play the political humor straight down the middle the way Johnny did and for the most part Leno is doing. Time to move up Craig Ferguson. I actually think that he'll do better at 11:30pm.

  • Ralph Hahn

    @USAmerica1st: Letterman owns part of Ferguson’s show. Why would he stiff the man he had personally tapped to replace that unfunny Craig Kilborn with an outsider like Jon Stewart, the name everyone brings up first when talking about Dave’s successor? Anyway, Stewart is now making more money than Jay and Dave working at Comedy Central. Ultimately, CBS is going to have the final say on Letterman’s replacement. And, it can’t be soon enough.

  • Ralph Hahn

    Why does Letterman have SEVEN executive producers?

    @Chris: Regarding Letterman and Fallon booking guests in NY: Although big name guests have always appeared on Letterman a day or so ahead of Conan and Fallon’s “Late Night” show, New York guests will likely do Letterman first (respect to the old man) when Fallon goes to “Tonight.” So that means that “Late Night” with Seth Myers will be 3rd in getting these big-shot actors plugging their latest movies.

  • Ralph Hahn

    P.S. Jerry Seinfeld: He won’t even do a prime-time show let alone a five night a week late night show. Jerry has zazillion dollars. He won’t do it. Conan? Nice guy, but once you’re doing a late-night show on TBS, you might as well have your picture on a milk carton. Louie Anderson? Never in a million years. Drew Carey? As Bob Barker proved, you can stay doing “The Price Is Right” the rest of your life. And, Bob’s still around.

  • Misha Lauenstein

    I started to get confused while reading the fourth paragraph. Was Bill Murray the first guest on the Late Show?

  • Igwell

    once you’re doing a late-night show on TBS, you might as well have your picture on a milk carton.

    Yeah, nobody watches TBS at night…

  • jcfreder

    Bill Murray was the first guest on both the CBS Late Show and NBC Late Night

  • Gary Middleton

    “New York guests will likely do Letterman first (respect to the old man) when Fallon goes to “Tonight.””

    I would not count on that. I think they’ll go where the audience is. If Fallon can beat Dave convincingly in the demo, big guests will often go there first.

© 2014 Tribune Digital Ventures