Masked Scheduler's Ratings Smackdown

One of the fun things about the holiday season was receiving gifts from the various shows that were on the network. Towards the end of my run the gifts started getting few and far between, and for several shows, it was an opportunity to give a generous donation to their favorite charity in the name of all who contributed to the success of the show. I thought I would walk through some of the types of gifts that shows would send out and tell you which were the most generous shows during my tenure at two networks.
Some of the most common gifts during the holidays were wine (consumed), hats (I have a mirror with hooks which are adorned with all of them), sweatshirts and sweaters (all with signage, from tasteful to obnoxious), jackets (see sweatshirts and sweaters), scarves (ditto), blankets, thumb drives and other electronic goodies such as chargers, portable DVD players, iPod and iPad covers, etc. A lot of that stuff was given away to the assistants on the hall or family. I often kept the blankets, some of which still lie around couches in the abode.
I got some cool jackets, several of which I have kept. On occasion, I still wear the "madTV" and "American Dad" jackets. I have a cool "House" thermal jacket, and one of my prized possessions is a suede jacket from "The X-Files."
I got a bottle of Scotch one year from the "House" producers, which I'm sure was a mistake. It was numbered, and I did some research and found that it was quite expensive and wasted on someone who never drinks the stuff.
By far the most generous show when it came to holiday gifting was "Seinfeld." Every year they came up with something interesting -- a leather script bag, a linen zip-up jacket, "Seinfeld" Nike sneakers, "Seinfeld" cereal bowls, and my all-time favorite holiday gift, a suede baseball jacket. I still have most of those lying around the house.
Something tells me those days are over in the biz. HAPPY HOLIDAYS!!!!
Send questions to masked.scheduler@gmail.com or @maskedscheduler on Twitter.

Broadcast primetime live + same-day ratings for Monday, Dec. 25, 2017

Note: Live sports on ABC — NBA in most of the country and “Monday Night Football” in Philadelphia and Oakland — will likely result in greater adjustments than usual in the finals.

The numbers for Monday:

Time Show Adults 18-49 rating/share
Viewers (millions)
8 p.m. NBA Basketball (ABC) (8-11 p.m.) 1.8/7 5.46
Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas (NBC) – R 1.6/6 5.31
The Big Bang Theory (CBS) – R 0.9/3 5.32
Showtime at the Apollo (FOX) – R 0.4/2 1.74
iHeartRadio Jingle Ball (The CW) (8-9:30 p.m.) – R 0.3/1 1.02
8:30 p.m. Movie: How the Grinch Stole Christmas (NBC) (8:30-11 p.m.) 1.3/5 3.98
Kevin Can Wait (CBS) – R 0.7/3 4.08
9 p.m. Young Sheldon (CBS) – R 0.7/3 4.33
The Gifted (FOX) – R 0.3/1 1.14
9:30 p.m. Man with a Plan (CBS) – R 0.5/2 3.63
Whose Line Is It Anyway? (The CW) – R 0.2/1 0.73
10 p.m. Scorpion (CBS) – R 0.5/2 3.26

 

ABC’s primetime NBA game gave the network the gift of a ratings win on Christmas night.

The game between the Oklahoma City Thunder and Houston Rockets drew 5.46 million viewers and a 1.8 rating in adults 18-49, pending updates (affiliates in Philadelphia and Oakland pre-empted it for “Monday Night Football”). The five-game NBA slate across ESPN and ABC was up 39 percent vs. last year in metered-market household ratings (3.9 vs. 2.8 in 2016).

NBC finished second for the night with the animated “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” (1.6) and the Jim Carrey movie (1.3). They were helped by a late-afternoon NFL game on NBC.

Network averages:

ABC NBC CBS FOX CW
Adults 18-49 rating/share 1.8/7 1.3/5 0.6/3 0.4/2 0.3/1
Total Viewers (millions) 5.46 4.20 3.98 1.44 0.95

 

Late-night metered market ratings (adults 18-49, households):

11:35 p.m.

“Jimmy Kimmel Live” – R: 0.7/4, 1.6/4

“The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” – R: 0.6/3, 1.5/4

“The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” – R: 0.2/1, 1.6/4

12:35 a.m.

“Nightline”: 0.4/3, 1.0/3

“Late Night with Seth Meyers” – R: 0.4/3, 0.9/3

“The Late Late Show with James Corden” – R: 0.1/1, 0.7/3

Definitions:

Rating: Estimated percentage of the universe of TV households (or other specified group) tuned to a program in the average minute. Ratings are expressed as a percent.
Fast Affiliate Ratings: These first national ratings are available at approximately 11 a.m. ET the day after telecast. The figures may include stations that did not air the entire network feed, as well as local news breaks or cutaways for local coverage or other programming. Fast Affiliate ratings are not as useful for live programs and are likely to differ significantly from the final results, because the data reflect normal broadcast feed patterns. 
Share (of Audience): 
The percent of households (or persons) using television who are tuned to a specific program, station or network in a specific area at a specific time. 
Time Shifted Viewing:
 Program ratings for national sources are produced in three streams of data – Live, Live +Same-Day and Live +7 Day. Time-shifted figures account for incremental viewing that takes place with DVRs. Live+SD includes viewing during the same broadcast day as the original telecast, with a cut-off of 3 a.m. local time when meters transmit daily viewing to Nielsen for processing. Live +7 ratings include  viewing that takes place during the 7 days following a telecast.

Source: The Nielsen Company.

Posted by:Rick Porter

Rick Porter has been covering TV since the days when networks sent screeners on VHS, one of which was a teaser for the first season of "American Idol." He's left-handed, makes a very solid grilled cheese and has been editor of TV by the Numbers since October 2015. He lives in Austin.

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