Nick-News-1

via press release:

NICK NEWS WITH LINDA ELLERBEE GIVES A GLIMPSE

INTO THE LIVES OF CUBAN KIDS IN

“SO CLOSE AND YET SO FAR AWAY: THE KIDS OF CUBA”

PREMIERING MONDAY, APRIL 13, ON NICKELODEON

 

NEW YORK – April 7, 2015 – More than 50 years after severing ties, America and Cuba recently agreed to work to improve their relationship. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee journeys to Cuba to explore what this means for the children of tomorrow and shed some light on what it’s like to be a kid in Cuba today in the brand-new special, “So Close and Yet So Far Away: The Kids of Cuba,” premiering Monday, April 13, at 8 p.m. (ET/PT) on Nickelodeon.

 

“Cuba is an underdeveloped country. But it’s a free country,” says Darian, 15.

 

“For me, the most beautiful part of Cuba is the people,” adds Alejandra, 15.

 

In 1959 Cuban rebels led by Fidel Castro overthrew Cuba’s American-supported dictator. Following this, Cuba aligned itself with the communist Soviet Union. As a result, the capitalist United States cut off diplomatic relations with the island and passed a law making it illegal to do business with Cuba and in most cases, to go there. “So Close and Yet So Far Away: The Kids of Cuba” explores what happens if this situation changes.

 

“I would like American kids to come to Cuba, so that way I can meet them and learn about their lives,” says Dunia, 14.

 

Alejandra, 15, adds, “They can see our country, the way we live, and they can see that a lot of the things that they are told about our country aren’t true.”

 

“I like that I can have medicine…and medical attention, without having to pay for any costs,” says Ruben, 15. “But I would like to change, above all, the lack of communication due to not having Internet. I would like for us to be able to travel to many more places.”

 

Lessandra, 12, says, “But I would like to have peace between the two countries.”

 

Ellerbee adds, “The main thing to remember is what happens between our countries will not happen overnight.”

 

Nick News, produced by Lucky Duck Productions, is now in its 24th year and is the longest-running kids’ news show in television history. It has built its reputation on the respectful and direct way it speaks to kids about the important issues of the day. Over the years, Nick News has received more than 21 Emmy nominations and won its tenth Emmy Award for Forgotten But Not Gone: Kids, HIV & AIDS in the category of Outstanding Children’s Nonfiction Program. Additional Emmy wins for outstanding children’s programming include: Under the Influence: Kids of Alcoholics (2011); (The Face of Courage: Kids Living with Cancer (2010); Coming Home: When Parents Return from War (2009); The Untouchable Kids of India (2008); Private Worlds: Kids and Autism (2007); Never Again: From the Holocaust to the Sudan (2005); Faces of Hope: The Kids of Afghanistan (2002) and What Are You Staring At? (1998).   In 1995, the entire series won the Emmy.  In 2009, Nick News was honored with the Edward R. Murrow Award for best Network News Documentary for Coming Home: When Parents Return from War — the first-ever kids’ television program to receive this prestigious award. Nick News has also received three Peabody Awards, including a personal award given to Ellerbee for explaining the impeachment of President Clinton to kids, as well as a Columbia duPont Award and more than a dozen Parents’ Choice Awards.

 

 

Nickelodeon, now in its 36th year, is the number-one entertainment brand for kids. It has built a diverse, global business by putting kids first in everything it does. The company includes television programming and production in the United States and around the world, plus consumer products, online, recreation, books and feature films. Nickelodeon’s U.S. television network is seen in more than 100 million households and has been the number-one-rated basic cable network for 20 consecutive years. For more information or artwork, visit http://www.nickpress.com. Nickelodeon and all related titles, characters and logos are trademarks of Viacom Inc. (NASDAQ: VIA, VIAB).

Posted by:TV By The Numbers

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